Scholarly article on topic 'An update on predicting motor recovery after stroke'

An update on predicting motor recovery after stroke Academic research paper on "Clinical medicine"

CC BY-NC-ND
0
0
Share paper
OECD Field of science
Keywords
{Stroke / Rehabilitation / Prognosis / Motor / AVC / Rééducation / Pronostic / Moteur}

Abstract of research paper on Clinical medicine, author of scientific article — C.M. Stinear, W.D. Byblow, S.H. Ward

Abstract Being able to predict an individual's potential for recovery of motor function after stroke may facilitate the use of more effective targeted rehabilitation strategies, and management of patient expectations and goals. This review summarises developments since 2010 of approaches based on clinical, neurophysiological and neuroimaging measures for predicting individual patients’ potential for upper limb recovery. Clinical assessments alone have low prognostic accuracy. Transcranial magnetic stimulation can be used to assess the functional integrity of the corticomotor pathway, and has some predictive value but is not superior when used in isolation due to its low negative predictive value. Neuroimaging measures can be used to assess the structural integrity of descending white matter tracts. Recent studies indicate that the integrity of corticospinal and alternate motor tracts in both hemispheres may be useful predictors of motor recovery after stroke. The PREP algorithm is currently the only sequential algorithm that combines clinical, neurophysiological and neuroimaging measures at the sub-acute stage to predict the potential for subsequent recovery of upper limb function. Future research could determine if a similar algorithmic approach may be useful for predicting the recovery of gait after stroke.

Academic research paper on topic "An update on predicting motor recovery after stroke"

Available online at

ScienceDirect

www.sciencedirect.com

Elsevier Masson France

EM| consulte

www.em-consulte.com

Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine 57 (2014) 489-498

Literature review / Revue de la littérature

An update on predicting motor recovery after stroke

Nouveautés sur la récupération motrice après AVC

C.M. Stineara,b'*'1, W.D. Byblowbc1, S.H. Wardc

a Clinical Neuroscience Laboratory, Department of Medicine, University of Auckland, Private Bag, 92019 Auckland, New Zealand Centre for Brain Research, University of Auckland, Private Bag, 92019 Auckland, New Zealand c Movement Neuroscience Laboratory, Department of Sport and Exercise Science, University of Auckland, Private Bag, 92019 Auckland, New Zealand

Received 9 August 2014; accepted 9 August 2014

Abstract

Being able to predict an individual's potential for recovery of motor function after stroke may facilitate the use of more effective targeted rehabilitation strategies, and management of patient expectations and goals. This review summarises developments since 2010 of approaches based on clinical, neurophysiological and neuroimaging measures for predicting individual patients' potential for upper limb recovery. Clinical assessments alone have low prognostic accuracy. Transcranial magnetic stimulation can be used to assess the functional integrity of the corticomotor pathway, and has some predictive value but is not superior when used in isolation due to its low negative predictive value. Neuroimaging measures can be used to assess the structural integrity of descending white matter tracts. Recent studies indicate that the integrity of corticospinal and alternate motor tracts in both hemispheres may be useful predictors of motor recovery after stroke. The PREP algorithm is currently the only sequential algorithm that combines clinical, neurophysiological and neuroimaging measures at the sub-acute stage to predict the potential for subsequent recovery of upper limb function. Future research could determine if a similar algorithmic approach may be useful for predicting the recovery of gait after stroke.

© 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. Open access under CC BY-NC-ND license.

Keywords: Stroke; Rehabilitation; Prognosis; Motor Résumé

Prédire la capacité; individuelle du patient a récupérer ses fonctions motrices après AVC peut faciliter une utilisation plus efficace de strategies ciblées de reeducation fonctionnelle, et une meilleure prise en charge des attentes et objectifs des patients. Cette revue resume depuis 2010 les developpements des approches prédictives du potentiel individuel de recuperation motrice du membre superieur de chaque patient basees sur des mesures cliniques, neurophysiologiques et d'imagerie. Les evaluations cliniques seules ont une valeur prédictive faible. La stimulation magnetique transcranienne peut etre utilistîe dans revaluation de l'integrite fonctionnelle de la voie corticomotrice, et montre une certaine valeur prédictive mais n'est pas superieure quand elle est utilisee seule a cause de sa faible valeur prédictive negative. Les mesures de neuroimagerie peuvent evaluer l'integrite structurelle des faisceaux descendants de la substance blanche. De récentes etudes montrent que l'integrite du faisceau corticospinal et des voies motrices indirectes au sein des deux hemispheres peuvent se réveler des marqueurs prédictifs utiles de la recuperation motrice post-AVC. L'algorithme PREP est actuellement le seul algorithme sequentiel combinant des mesures cliniques, neurophysiologiques et de neuroimagerie durantla phase subaigue de l'AVC, qui est capable de prédire le potentiel de recuperation motrice du membre superieur. De futures etudes pourraient determiner si une approche algorithmique similaire pourrait se reveler utile pour prédire la recuperation de la marche post-AVC. # 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. Este é um artigo Open Access sob a licença de CC BY-NC-ND

Mots clés : AVC ; Rééducation ; Pronostic ; Moteur

* Corresponding author. Department of Medicine, University of Auckland, Private Bag, 92019 Auckland, New Zealand 1142. Tel.: +64 9 92 33 779.

E-mail address: c.stinear@auckland.ac.nz, DPerennou@chu-grenoble.fr (C.M. Stinear).

1 These authors contributed equally to this work.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rehab.2014.08.006

1877-0657/© 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. Open access under CC BY-NC-ND license.

1. English version

1.1. Introduction

Stroke is the third most common cause of long-term adult disability in developed countries [1]. There are nearly 800,000 strokes a year in the United States alone, with a third of all stroke survivors experiencing varying levels of disability [2]. The ability of stroke survivors to independently undertake activities of daily living is dependent on the recovery of motor function, particularly of the upper limb [3].

Recovery of motor function is characterized by the individual's ability to perform movements using the same effectors and muscle activation patterns in the same manner as prior to stroke [4]. Recovery is highly variable within the initial days after stroke when rehabilitation begins, making it difficult to estimate with any great degree of accuracy the extent of motor recovery that will be obtained months after stroke at the end of rehabilitation. The ability to predict an individual's potential for motor recovery could add value because it would allow for individually-tailored rehabilitation, management of patient and therapist expectations, and may result in more effective utilization of health resources.

This review provides an update on developments since 2010, when we proposed an algorithm for predicting the potential for recovery of upper limb function for individual patients [5]. Here we identify new studies on the key predictors of motor recovery post-stroke that provide general support for the proposed algorithm, and extend the idea to the lower limb.

1.2. A multimodal approach

Currently, three main methods have been identified for evaluating capacity for motor recovery in the initial days after stroke: clinical assessment scales, neurophysiological assessments, and neuroimaging techniques. In 2010 we proposed an algorithm to sequentially combine these measures to make accurate prognoses of upper limb recovery for individual patients as they begin rehabilitation, at the sub-acute stage of stroke. The algorithm begins with a clinical assessment within 72 hours of symptom onset [5]. Shoulder abduction and finger extension strength are each graded out of 5 using the Medical Research Council (MRC) grades, and then summed to produce a SAFE score (Shoulder Abduction, Finger Extension), with a maximum score of 10. This simple bedside test can identify patients with excellent potential for motor recovery in the upper limb. Patients with a SAFE score of 8 or more have the potential to make a complete or near-complete recovery within 12 weeks.

Patients with a SAFE score below 8 then have a neurophysiological assessment within a week after symptom onset. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is used to assess the functional integrity of the corticospinal tract. TMS is a safe, non-invasive tool that can be used to stimulate primary motor cortex (M1). Stimulation of M1activates the corticospi-nal tract and induces responses in the contralateral muscles, visualised as a muscle twitch and recorded as motor evoked potentials (MEPs) using surface electromyography. TMS

provides an objective and quantitative functional assessment of the motor cortex and its descending tracts after stroke. In the algorithm, if MEPs are present in the wrist extensor muscle, the patient has the potential to make a notable recovery of upper limb function within 12 weeks. While the recovery may not be complete, the patient will be able to use their affected upper limb in some activities of daily living by 12 weeks, even if they initially had a dense paresis and flaccid limb.

If MEPs cannot be elicited in the wrist extensors, diffusion-weighted MRI is used to assess the structural integrity of the posterior limbs of the internal capsules (PLICs). The PLICs contain the major white matter pathways between the motor and sensory cortices and the spinal cord. Damage to these pathways can be detected with diffusion-weighted MRI, which produces a measure of fractional anisotropy (FA). FA asymmetry between the PLICs of the lesioned and non-lesioned hemispheres can distinguish between patients with limited potential versus no potential for upper limb recovery [5].

1.3. The PREP algorithm

There is initial evidence in support of this sequential algorithmic approach. The predicting recovery potential (PREP) algorithm can accurately predict an individual's potential for recovery of upper limb function [6]. The PREP algorithm was tested with 40 sub-acute ischaemic stroke patients, to see whether it could predict individual patients' subsequent upper limb function at 12 weeks after stroke. It had positive predictive power of 88%, negative predictive power of 83%, specificity of 88% and sensitivity of 73%. The PREP algorithm improves upon preceding algorithms proposed [5], by defining the FA asymmetry threshold between limited and no potential for recovery for patients at the sub-acute stage (Fig. 1).

The PREP algorithm is designed for efficiency and economy, by starting with a simple bedside clinical assessment, and only using more advanced techniques if required to resolve uncertainty. The algorithm may be useful for setting realistic upper limb rehabilitation goals, and managing patient and therapist expectations. For example, rehabilitation goals for patients with notable recovery potential (a SAFE score below 8 and MEPs in the wrist extensors) could focus on strength, coordination and dexterity, while minimising compensation with the other hand. Rehabilitation for patients with no potential for upper limb recovery (a SAFE score below 8, no MEPs, and a high FA asymmetry) could focus on prevention of secondary complications such as shoulder subluxation and spasticity, and training compensation with the other hand for activities of daily living [6]. The PREP algorithm could also be used to more accurately stratify patients in clinical trials. Further work is under way to test the PREP algorithm in patients with haemorraghic or previous stroke, and to explore the potential clinical and economic benefits of using the algorithm in clinical practice.

There have been further studies published since 2010 that explore the usefulness of clinical, neurophysiological and

Fig. 1. The PREP Algorithm predicts the potential for recovery of upper limb function by 12 weeks post-stroke. A SAFE score is determined from a bedside assessment within 72 hours post-stroke. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is used to elicit MEP in individuals who have a SAFE score < 8. If the individual has no MEP present then MRI with diffusion-weighed imaging is used to determine an asymmetry index based on fractional anisotropy measured within the posterior limbs of the internal capsules. PNR = point of no return which corresponds to an asymmetry index of 0.15. The algorithm allows categorization of individuals based on their predicted motor recovery potential. Reproduced with permission [6].

neuroimaging measures for predicting motor recovery after stroke. The following sections evaluate recent evidence for each of these types of measures.

1.4. Clinical assessment

The need for better predictive tools has been highlighted recently in a study by Nijland et al. [7]. These authors reported the success rates of highly experienced therapists in predicting Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) score at six months based on assessment at 72 hours after stroke, and again at discharge from the acute stroke unit. Therapists were asked to predict future ARAT score within broad categories (< 10; 10-56; and 57). The predictions they made at 72 hours that 64 patients would have some upper limb function at six months (ARAT score 10-56) were no better than chance (53% incorrect). The authors proposed a computational prediction model based on clinical data, which improved prognosis statistically, but still led to an error rate of 42% for predicting outcomes within this range of function. This study demonstrates quite clearly that for many patients it is not yet possible to make accurate predictions based on clinical assessment alone. This study therefore supports the PREP algorithm approach, of adding neurophysiological and neuroimaging assessments if required to reduce uncertainty [5,6].

Clinical assessment may be more useful for predicting recovery of gait. Veerbeek et al. recently reported that sitting balance and lower limb strength 72 hours after stroke strongly

predicted the recovery of independent gait at six months after stroke [8]. These authors studied 154 patients and found that those who achieved both a full score on the Trunk Control Test and a Motricity Index score > 25 within 72 hours, would recover independent gait by six months after stroke (Functional Ambulation Category > 4). Conversely, patients who did not have sitting balance and some lower limb strength 72 hours after stroke had a 27% chance of achieving independent gait by six months after stroke. While these results are promising, the prediction model requires validation in a separate cohort of patients.

More generally, an absence of active movement in the upper or lower limb on initial assessment does not necessarily preclude motor recovery. Clinical assessment can be difficult in individuals with cognitive impairment, and the observed motor impairment on assessment may be due to lack of understanding rather than loss of movement of the limb. Neurophysiological measures provide an objective assessment of the functional integrity of descending motor pathways to the paretic limbs.

1.5. Neurophysiology

Transcranial magnetic stimulation can be used in diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of motor deficits after stroke [9]. The simple presence or absence of MEPs in the paretic limb can offer useful prognostic information. Motor evoked potential testing using TMS is more sensitive than conventional clinical assessment to detect residual corticospinal tract function. TMS can induce MEPs in around 30% of individuals with complete paralysis of the hand, and these patients' potential for recovery would be otherwise be missed by conventional clinical assessment [10].

A more sophisticated way of using TMS to predict recovery after stroke has been reported by Di Lazzaro et al. [11]. These authors used repetitive TMS to investigate motor cortex plasticity in 17 patients who had experienced stroke within the previous 10 days. The repetitive TMS protocol involved theta burst stimulation of the ipsilesional motor cortex, which is expected to facilitate its excitability. They found that the immediate effects of stimulation were correlated with modified Rankin Scale score at six months after stroke. Patients with the greatest neurophysiological response to the stimulation were more likely to have a better outcome. This study is important because it indicates that the plastic response to TMS may also be a useful predictor of recovery after stroke. However, the modified Rankin Scale is not particularly sensitive to recovery of motor function. The usefulness of this approach for predicting individual patients' potential for motor recovery has yet to be tested.

1.6. Neuroimaging

Magnetic resonance imaging allows visualisation of the stroke lesion and its relationship to surrounding cortical and subcortical white and grey matter. Lesion volume information from MRI is not an independent predictor of motor recovery, and does not increase the accuracy of prediction models [12].

More recent studies have confirmed that simple measures of lesion volume do not predict the extent of motor recovery in the upper limb [13] and are not related to lower limb function at the chronic stage [14].

Diffusion tensor imaging allows the calculation of fractional anisotropy (FA) in each image voxel, which quantifies the directionality of water diffusion. The mean FA within specified areas of white matter can be used to quantify the structural damage caused by stroke to the white matter pathways. Diffusion tensor imaging can also be used to perform tractography, to reconstruct the corticospinal tract that descends from motor cortex, through the PLIC, to the spinal cord. The extent of overlap between the stroke lesion and the corticospinal tract [15-17], and the fractional anisotropy along the corticospinal tract [18], are both related to upper limb motor impairment and the response to therapy at the chronic stage of stroke.

A recent study by Puig et al. explored the usefulness of tractography for predicting motor recovery at the sub-acute stage [13]. These authors rated the extent of corticospinal tract (CST) disruption in the motor cortex, premotor cortex, corona radiata, centrum semiovale and PLIC within 12 hours of symptom onset, and at three and 30 days after stroke, for 60 patients. They found that CST damage at the level of the PLIC, visualised within 12 hours of symptom onset, most strongly predicted upper and lower limb impairment 90 days after stroke. This highlights the value of assessing white matter integrity within the PLIC when predicting motor outcomes. However, it should be noted that motor impairment was evaluated with the NIH Stroke Scale, which is not particularly sensitive, and motor function was not assessed. In 2013, Puig et al. investigated the prediction of longer term motor outcomes [19]. They used MRI to assess 70 patients within 12 hours of symptom onset, and at 3 and 30 days after stroke. They found that the ratio between the mean FA values in the ipsilesional and contralesional pons at 30 days after stroke was the only independent predictor of motor outcome at two years after stroke, measured with the Motricity Index. This study again confirms the importance of the CST for recovery of motor function, however the predictive power of FA asymmetry within the PLIC wasn't evaluated.

The usefulness of FA measures for predicting motor outcomes after subcortical haemorrhagic stroke have recently been evaluated by Koyama et al. [20]. These authors obtained MRI scans from 32 patients within three weeks of stroke. The ratio of FA values between hemispheres in the cerebral peduncles, and in the corona radiata/PLIC, were related to upper and lower limb strength at one month measured with the MRC scale. The ratio of FA values in the cerebral peduncles was more strongly related to motor strength than the ratio obtained from the corona radiata/PLIC. These results indicate that motor outcomes after subcortical stroke may be more accurately predicted by FA measures made distal to the stroke lesion. However, the MRC scale is not particularly sensitive, and does not reflect recovery of function in the upper or lower limb. A recent study of patients at the chronic stage found that FA asymmetry in the PLIC was strongly related to

walking ability [14], adding further support to the use of this neuroimaging measure for predicting subsequent recovery of function in both the lower and upper limbs.

Functional neuroimaging tools can also be used to examine cortical activation after stroke. The basis of functional MRI (fMRI) is that the blood-oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal detects changes in haemoglobin levels as a proxy for neuronal activity. The degree of cortical activation, and the regions activated, is highly variable post-stroke. Very few studies have examined the relationship between fMRI measures and subsequent recovery of motor function after stroke. Marshall et al. obtained fMRI scans from 23 patients within days of stroke [21]. They related the average pattern of cortical activity during repetitive closure of the paretic hand to the change in upper limb motor impairment over the following three months, measured with the Fugl-Meyer scale. They found that there was a pattern of cortical activity that was positively related to improve upper limb movement for this group of patients. This is a useful first step towards using fMRI measures to predict motor recovery. It remains to be seen whether fMRI measures can be used to make accurate predictions for individual patients, and whether fMRI measures are superior to structural measures of white matter tract integrity. A more recent study of patients between three and nine months after stroke found that the integrity of the descending white matter tracts in the PLIC was more strongly correlated with upper limb function than fMRI measures [22].

1.7. Beyond the corticospinal tract

The degree of damage to the corticospinal tract is linked closely with motor function recovery, but other white matter pathways may also have a role. The integrity of alternate motor fibres and transcallosal fibers may also be important for recovery. It is hypothesised, based primarily on non-human imaging data, that these alternate motor fibres consist of the corticorubrospinal pathway and the corticoreticulospinal pathway (Fig. 2). A recent study of 18 patients at the chronic stage of stroke reported that the structural integrity of both the ipsilesional corticospinal tract and the ipsilesional alternate motor fibres is strongly related to motor function of the upper limb, measured with the Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT) [23]. A similar study of 15 patients at the chronic stage reported that FA measured in the corpus callosum, connecting the primary motor cortices of each hemisphere, was also related to motor function of the upper limb measured with the WMFT, and the response to therapy [24].

Contralesional descending motor tracts may also have a role to play in the control of the proximal muscles of the paretic limb. The potential contribution of contralesional motor pathways to walking has recently been investigated. Jang et al. examined the corticospinal and corticoreticular tracts in both hemispheres of 54 chronic stroke patients [25]. They found that the number of fibres in the contralesional corticoreticular tract was related to walking ability, assessed with the Functional Ambulation Category. Other alternate motor pathways such as the contralesional corticoreticulospinal

Fig. 2. The pathway of the corticospinal tract and alternate motor fibers (aMF). Visualization of the corticospinal tract and aMF as they descend from the motor cortex to the pons. The corticospinal tract is in red to yellow, the aMF are in dark to light blue, and the transcallosal fibers linking right M1 to left M1 are in green. The position of the aMF pathway fits with the hypothesis that the corticoru-bropsinal and corticoreticulospinal pathways make up the aMF. Reproduced with permission [24].

pathway may contribute to proximal upper limb recovery, particularly when the ipsilesional corticospinal tract has sustained significant damage [26].

Together, these recent studies indicate that the prediction of motor recovery after stroke could usefully consider the integrity of motor pathways in both hemispheres, including corticoru-brospinal and corticoreticulospinal tracts. However, studies to date have focused on patients at the chronic stage of stroke. The usefulness of examining other motor pathways at the sub-acute stage remains to be explored.

1.8. Combined measures

The PREP algorithm is currently the only approach that combines clinical, neurophysiological and neuroimaging measures in a sequential way. More recent studies have compared the prognostic accuracy of TMS and diffusion-weighted MRI measures. Jang et al. used TMS and tractography to study 54 patients with intracerebral haemorrhage and severe motor weakness. The TMS and MRI measures were made within four weeks of stroke, and were related to the upper limb Motricity Index at six months after stroke [27]. As expected, patients in whom MEPs could be elicited in the paretic upper limb, and with an intact corticospinal tract visualised with tractography, had better motor outcomes. These authors also report that TMS had a higher positive predictive power, while tractography had a higher negative predictive power, and this finding was replicated by these authors in a subsequent study [28]. These studies confirm that neuroimaging is particularly useful for identifying which patients with no MEPs also have no potential for motor recovery, in line with the PREP algorithm.

1.9. Conclusions and future directions

Combining neurophysiological and neuroimaging measures can improve predictive power [27,28]. However obtaining these measures for all patients may not be practical or economical. The PREP algorithm recommends sequentially combining measures, beginning with a simple bedside clinical assessment. TMS and MRI measures are only made as required to resolve uncertainty. Research in this area since the algorithm was first proposed generally supports this approach. The PREP algorithm is an example of how accurate predictions can be made for individual patients, and rehabilitation plans can then be tailored appropriately. Algorithms such as PREP can also strengthen the design of randomised control trials of new therapies that aim to improve motor outcomes after stroke. For example, determining an individual patient's corticospinal tract integrity predicts response to non-invasive brain stimulation of Ml at the chronic stage [29]. This type of information could be deemed essential for stratification of patients, especially in studies with small numbers of patients, as is common with rehabilitation trials. This stratification procedure has also been recognised to be critically important in trials of new experimental therapies [30]. Currently there is no predictive algorithm for recovery of lower limb function, although recent evidence indicates that MEP and FA measures could be of some use. Further research is needed to determine if such techniques can be used and combined early after stroke to improve prognosis of gait recovery.

Disclosure of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest concerning this article.

2. Version française

2.1. Introduction

L'accident vasculaire cerebral (AVC) représente la troisieme cause de handicap acquis de l'adulte dans les pays industrialises [1]. Aux Etats-Unis, on compte environ 800 000 AVC annuellement, et un tiers des survivants auront des sequelles responsables de handicap [2]. La capacite de la personne a assumer les activites de la vie quotidienne après AVC depend de la recuperation de la fonction motrice, tout specialement pour le membre superieur [3].

La recuperation de la fonction motrice est caracterisee par la capacite de l'individu a accomplir de maniere similaire les mouvements faisant appel aux memes effecteurs et schemas d'activation musculaire qu'avant l'AVC [4]. La recuperation est très variable dans les premiers jours après l'AVC quand la reeducation fonctionnelle commence, rendant difficile une estimation precise de l'etendue de la recuperation motrice qui ne sera effective que plusieurs mois après l'AVC en fin de reeducation. La capacite a prédire le potentiel de recuperation motrice d'un individu pourrait se reveler utile car cela permettrait de mettre en place une reeducation sur mesure,

de prendre en charge les attentes des patients et des thérapeutes, et pourrait résulter en une utilisation plus efficace des ressources de sante publique.

Cette revue detaille les developpements ayant eu lieu depuis 2010, lorsque nous avions propose un algorithme prédictif du potentiel de recuperation de la fonction motrice du membre superieur pour chaque patient [5]. Dans ce travail, nous identifions de nouvelles etudes sur les facteurs cles prédictifs de la recuperation motrice post-AVC, qui soutienne l'algorithme propose et qui pourraient etre extrapoles au membre inferieur.

2.2. Une approche multimodale

Actuellement, trois methodes principales ont ete identifiees pour evaluer la capacite de recuperation motrice dans les jours qui suivent l'AVC : les echelles dévaluation clinique, les evaluations neurophysiologiques et les techniques de neuroimagerie. En 2010, nous proposions un algorithme sequentiel pour combiner ces trois methodes afin d'etablir un pronostique fiable de la recuperation motrice du membre superieur du patient au debut de sa reeducation fonctionnelle, durant la phase subaigue de l'AVC. L'algorithme commence par une evaluation clinique complete dans les 72 heures après l'apparition des symptômes de l'AVC [5]. L'abduction de lrépaule et la force d'extension des doigts sont notees sur 5 sur l'echelle MRC (Medical Research Council) et ces notes sont ensuite additionnees pour produire un score shoulder abduction, finger extension (SAFE), dont le score maximal est 10. Les patients ayant un score SAFE de 8 ou plus ont le potentielpour une recuperation motrice complete, ou presque complete dans les 12 semaines qui suivent leur AVC.

Les patients avec un score SAFE en dessous de 8 passent une evaluation neurophysiologique dans la semaine suivant l'apparition des symptomes. La stimulation magnetique transcranienne (transcranial magnetic stimulation [TMS]) est utilisee pour evaluer l'integrite fonctionnelle du faisceau corticospinal. La TMS est une methode sans danger et non invasive utilisee pour stimuler le cortex moteur primaire (M1). La stimulation du M1 active le faisceau corticospinal qui induit une réponse des muscles controlateraux, cette réponse est visualisee comme un tressautement musculaire, elle est enregistrée en tant que potentiels moteurs evoques (PME) a l'aide de l'electromyographie de surface. La TMS fournit une evaluation fonctionnelle quantitative et objective après l'AVC du cortex moteur et de ses faisceaux descendants. Dans l'algorithme, si des PME sont presents dans les extenseurs du poignet, le patient montre un potentiel pour une recuperation motrice notable du membre superieur dans les 12 semaines. Meme si la recuperation n'est pas complete, le patient sera capable d'utiliser son membre superieur lese dans certaines activites de la vie quotidienne au bout de 12 semaines après l'AVC, meme si initialement il existait une parèsie severe et une flaccidite du membre.

Si les PEM ne sont pas retrouves dans les extenseurs du poignet, on a recours a l'IRM de diffusion pour evaluer l'integrite structurelle des bras posterieurs des capsules internes (BPCI). Les BPCI contiennent les principaux faisceaux de la

substance blanche reliant les cortex moteurs et sensitifs et la moelle epiniere. Une lesion de ces faisceaux peut etre detectee a l'aide de l'IRM de diffusion qui permet de mesurer la fraction d'anisotropie (FA). L'asymetrie FA entre les BPCI de l'hemisphere sain et l'hemisphere lese peut differentier les patients ayant un potentiel limite de recuperation fonctionnelle du membre superieur de ceux n'ayant aucun potentiel de recuperation [5].

2.3. L'algorithme PREP

Des preuves initiales soutiennent cette approche algorithmique sequentielle. L'algorithme predicting recovery potential (PREP) peut prédire de maniere fiable le potentiel individuel de recuperation motrice du membre superieur des patients [6]. L'algorithme PREP a ete teste chez 40 patients en phase subaigue d'AVC ischemique, afin dévaluer sa capacite a prédire la motricite fonctionnelle du membre superieur des patients 12 semaines après l'AVC. Les résultats montrent un pouvoir prédictif positif de 88 %, un pouvoir prédictif negatif de 83 %, une specificite de 88 % et une sensibilite de 73 %. L'algorithme PREP est une amelioration par rapport aux autres algorithmes proposes [5], il permet de definir le seuil d'asymetrie FA entre un potentiel limite et aucun potentiel de recuperation chez le patient en phase subaigue d'AVC (Fig. 1).

L'algorithme PREP est concu pour etre efficace et economique, en commencant par un simple examen clinique au lit du patient, et en utilisant uniquement les techniques plus avancees, si necessaire, afin de résoudre des situations cliniques

Prédiction de la récupération motrice du membre supérieure

Score SAFE 1—J Complète

_ 1 1 M

TMS I_I MEP présent UJ Notable

1 1 M

1 MEP absent X

w IRM Asymmetry U Limitée

1 index <PNR ri

Asymmetry index >PNR H Aucune

Fig. 1. L'algorithme PREP prédit le potentiel de récupération fonctionnelle du membre superieur a 12 semaines post-AVC. Le score SAFE est determine a partir d'un examen clinique au lit du malade dans les 72 heures suivant l'AVC. La stimulation magnetique transcranienne (TMS) est utilisee pour enregistrer les PME chez les patients ayant un score SAFE < 8. Si le patient n'a pas de PME alors l'IRM de diffusion est utilisee pour determiner un indice d'asymetrie basee sur la fraction d'anisotropie mesurée au sein des bras posterieurs des capsules internes. Le point de non-retour (PNR) correspondant a un indice d'asymetrie de 0,15. L'algorithme permet de catégoriser les individus en se basant sur leur potentiel prédictif de récuperation motrice. Reproduit avec permission [6].

incertaines. L'algorithme peut etre utile pour mettre en place des objectifs réalistes de reeducation fonctionnelle du membre superieur et gerer les attentes des patients et therapeutes. Par exemple, les objectifs de reeducation des patients ayant un potentiel de recuperation notable (un score SAFE en dessous de 8 et PME dans les extenseurs du poignet) devraient se focaliser sur la force, la coordination et la dexterite, tout en minimisant les exercices de compensation par l'autre main. La reeducation des patients n'ayant aucun potentiel de recuperation motrice du membre superieur (un score SAFE en dessous de 8, absence de PME, et une grande asymetrie FA) pourrait se concentrer sur la prevention des complications secondaires, comme par exemple la subluxation de l'epaule et la spasticite, et mettre en place des programmes de reeducation pour entraîner le patient a compenser avec l'autre main dans les taches de la vie quotidienne [6]. L'algorithme PREP pourrait egalement se reveler utile pour stratification plus precise des patients dans les etudes cliniques. Des etudes complementaires sont en cours pour tester l'algorithme PREP chez les patients hemorragiques ou ayant eu un precedent AVC, afin d'explorer le potentiel clinique et les benefices economiques lies a l'utilisation de cet algorithme en pratique clinique.

D'autres etudes ont ete publiees depuis 2010 explorant la pertinence des mesures cliniques, neurophysiologiques et de neuroimagerie pour prédire la recuperation motrice post-AVC. Les chapitres suivants evaluent lrévidence clinique récente pour chaque type de mesure.

2.4. Evaluation clinique

Il a ete récemment souligne dans une etude par Nijland et al. [7] le besoin de meilleurs outils prédictifs de la recuperation motrice post-AVC. Ces auteurs rapportent les taux de succes de therapeutes experimentes pour prédire le score du test Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) a 6 mois post-AVC sur la base d'une evaluation a 72 heures post-AVC, et de nouveau a la sortie de l'hopital après la prise en charge de la phase aigue de l'AVC. Ces therapeutes devaient prédire les scores de l'ARAT au sein de categories larges (< 10 ; 10-56 ; et 57). Les predictions faites a 72 heures post-AVC que 64 patients récupereraient une fonction du membre superieur a 6 mois (score ARAT 10-56) n'etaient pas plus fiables que le hasard (53 % de ces predictions etaient incorrectes). Les auteurs proposaient un modele computationnel prédictif base sur les donnees cliniques, qui augmentait statistiquement le pronostic, mais montrait encore un taux d'erreur de 42 % pour les résultats prédictifs dans cette categorie fonctionnelle. Cette etude soutient donc l'approche de l'algorithme PREP, consistant a ajouter les evaluations neurophysiologiques et de neuroimagerie si necessaire a revaluation clinique afin de réduire les doutes [5,6].

Les evaluations cliniques semblent plus utiles pour prédire la recuperation de la marche. Dans une etude récente, Veerbeek et al. rapportaient que l'equilibre en position assise ainsi que la force dans les membres inferieurs 72 heures après l'AVC, etaient des facteurs prédictifs forts de la recuperation d'une

marche independante a 6 mois post-AVC [8]. Cette etude concernait 154 patients, et soulignait que ceux ayant a score complet au Trunk Control Test associe a un score de l'index de motricite > 25 dans les 72 premieres heures post-AVC, avaient une plus grande chance de récuperer une marche independante a 6 mois post-AVC (classification fonctionnelle de la marche [Functional Ambulation Category] > 4). A l'inverse, les patients n'ayant aucun equilibre en position assise et aucune force dans les membres inferieurs dans les 72 heures post-AVC, avaient 27 % de chance de récuperer une marche independante a 6 mois post-AVC. Bien que ces résultats soient prometteurs, le model prédictif necessite une validation dans une cohorte separée de patients.

Plus generalement, l'absence de mouvement actif des membres superieurs ou inferieurs lors de revaluation initiale, n' exclue pas forcement une recuperation motrice. L'évaluation clinique peut etre difficile chez les patients ayant des troubles cognitifs, et le deficit moteur observe a revaluation peut etre du a un manque de comprehension plutôt qu'aune atteinte de la motricite du membre. Les mesures neurophysiologiques fournissent une evaluation objective de l'integrite fonctionnelle des voies motrices descendantes vers les membres parétiques.

2.5. Neurophysiologie

La TMS peut etre utile dans le diagnostic, pronostic et traitement du deficit moteur après AVC [9]. La simple presence ou absence de PME dans le membre pareétique peut fournir des informations pronostiques pertinentes. L'enregistrement des potentiels moteurs evoques via TMS est plus sensible que l'eévaluation clinique conventionnelle pour deétecter une fonction résiduelle du faisceau corticospinal. La TMS peut induire des PEM chez environ 30 % des patients ayant une paralysie complete de la main, et le potentiel de recuperation motrice de ces patients ne serait pas mis en evidence lors d'une evaluation clinique classique [10].

Un moyen plus sophistique de se servir de la TMS pour prédire la recuperation après AVC a ete rapporte par Di Lazzaro et al [11]. Les auteurs ont utilise la TMS repetitive dans l'eétude de la plasticiteé du cortex moteur chez 17 patients ayant eu un AVC au cours des 10 derniers jours. Le protocole de TMS repetitive comprenait une theta burst stimulation (TBS) du cortex moteur ipsilesionel, pour faciliter son excitabiliteé. Les reésultats montrent que les effets immeédiats de la stimulation eétaient correéleés au score de l'echelle de Rankin modifiee a 6 mois post-AVC. Une excellente réponse neurophysiologique a la stimulation etait liee a l'augmentation de chance pour une meilleure reécupeération motrice. Cette eétude est importante car elle indique que la réponse plastique a la TMS peut etre un marqueur preédictif utile de la reécupeération post-AVC. Cependant, l'eéchelle de Rankin modifieée ne se montre pas particulierement sensible a la recuperation motrice fonctionnelle. La pertinence de cette approche dans la preédiction du potentiel de reécupeération motrice de chaque patient doit faire l'objet d'etudes complementaires.

2.6. Neuroimagerie

L'imagerie par resonance magnetique (IRM) permet de visualiser la lesion ischemique et ses relations avec la substance grise et la substance blanche pour les localisations corticales et sous-corticales. A l'IRM, les donnees sur le volume de la lesion ne représentent pas un facteur prédictif independant de la recuperation motrice, et n'augmentent pas la fiabilite des modeles prédictifs [12]. Des etudes plus récentes ont confirme que de simples mesures du volume lesionnel ne peuvent prédire l'etendue de la recuperation motrice du membre superieur [13], et ne sont pas liees a la fonction du membre inferieur au stade chronique [14].

L'imagerie par diffusion permet de calculer la fraction d'anisotropie (FA) dans chaque voxel d'image, qui quantifie la direction de la diffusion des molecules d'eau dans le cerveau. La valeur moyenne de la FA dans certaines aires specifiques de la substance blanche peut aider a la quantification du dommage structurel cause par l'AVC aux cordons de la substance blanche. L'imagerie de diffusion permet d'effectuer une tractographie, pour reconstruire le faisceau corticospinal qui descend du cortex moteur, via les BPCI, jusqu'a la moelle epiniere. L'étendue du chevauchement entre la lesion d'AVC et le faisceau corticospinal [15-17] et la fraction d'anisotropie le long du meme faisceau corticospinal [18], sont toutes deux liees au deficit moteur du membre superieur et a la réponse du patient a la reeducation fonctionnelle pendant la phase chronique de l'AVC.

Dans une etude récente, Puig et al. exploraient l'utilite de la tractographie pour prédire la recuperation motrice a la phase subaigue de l'AVC [13]. Ces auteurs ont note chez 60 patients l'etendue de la perturbation du faisceau corticospinal (FCS) dans le cortex moteur, le cortex preé-moteur, le corona radiata, le centre semi-ovale et les BPCI dans les 12 heures qui suivent l'AVC, et a 3 et 30 jours post-AVC. Ils ont trouve qu'un dommage du FCS au niveau des BPCI, visualise dans les 12 heures suivant l'apparition des symptômes, etait le prédicteur le plus important du deficit moteur pour le membre superieur et inferieur 90 jours après l'AVC. Ceci souligne la pertinence dévaluer l'integrite de la substance blanche dans les BPCI pour preédire la reécupeération motrice. Cependant, il doit etre note que le deficit moteur etait evalue a l'aide de léchelle AVC de la NIH, qui n'est pas une echelle particulierement sensible, de plus la fonction motrice n'etait pas mesurée. En 2013, une etude par Puig et al. evaluaient la prediction au long terme de la recuperation motrice [19] en faisant passer un IRM a 70 patients dans les 12 heures suivant la survenue des symptomes et de nouveau a 3 et 30 jours post-AVC. Ils rapportent que le ratio entre les valeurs moyennes de la FA dans les ponts ipsilesionel et contralesionnel a 30 jours post-AV eétait le seul facteur preédictif indeépendant de la reécupeération motrice 2 ans post-AVC, mesure a l'aide de l'index de motricite. De nouveau cette etude valide l'importance du faisceau corticospinal dans la reécupeération de la fonction motrice, cependant le pouvoir prédictif de l'asymetrie au sein des BPCI n'eétait pas eévalueé.

L'utilite de la mesure FA, dans la prediction de la recuperation motrice après un AVC hemorragique sous-

cortical, fut récemment rapportée par Koyama et al. [20]. Ces auteurs ont obtenu les donnees d'IRM de 32 patients dans les 3 semaines suivant leur AVC. Le ratio des valeurs FA entre les deux hemispheres au sein des pedoncules cerébraux, et le ratio corona radiata/BPCI, etaient lies a la force des membres superieur et inferieur mesurée a l'aide de léchelle MRC. Le ratio des valeurs FA dans les pedoncules cerébraux etait corréle de facon plus significative a la force motrice que le ratio obtenu dans la corona radiata/BPCI. Ceci souligne que les résultats de la recuperation motrice après un AVC sous-cortical peuvent etre prédits de maniere plus fiable par des mesures FA distales a la lesion ischemique.

Cependant léchelle MRC n'est pas particulierement sensible et ne reflete pas la recuperation fonctionnelle du membre superieur ou inferieur. Une etude récente de patients en phase chronique retrouvait que l'asymetrie FA dans les BPCI etait fortement corrélee a la capacite de marche, [14] apportant un soutien supplementaire a l'utilisation de cette mesure de neuroimagerie pour prédire la recuperation fonctionnelle du membre superieur et inferieur.

Les outils de neuroimagerie fonctionnelle peuvent servir a etudier l'activation corticale post-AVC. La base de l'IRM fonctionnelle (IRMf) est que le signal dependant du niveau d'oxygenation cerebrale (signal BOLD) detecte les changements dans les variations locales et transitoires de la quantite d'oxygene transportee par l'hemoglobine comme une indication de l'activite neuronale. Le degré d'activation corticale, et les regions activees, varient grandement post-AVC. Peu d'etudes ont examine la relation entre les mesures d'IRMf et la recuperation motrice post-AVC. Marshall et al. ont récuperé les donnees IRMf de 23 patients dans les jours suivant l'AVC [21]. A l'aide de léchelle de Fugl-Meyer, les auteurs ont corréle le schema standard d'activite corticale observe pendant le mouvement répete de fermeture de la main parétique a des changements dans le deficit moteur du membre superieur dans les trois mois suivants. L'étude souligne un schema d'activite corticale corréle de maniere positive a une amelioration de la motriciteé du membre supeérieur dans ce groupe de patients. Ceci repreésente un premier pas vers une utilisation des donneées d'IRMf dans la prediction de la recuperation motrice. Il reste a deémontrer si ces preédictions baseées sur les mesures d'IRMf peuvent conduire a des predictions fiables pour chaque patient, et si ces mesures d'IRMf sont supeérieures aux donneées structurelles sur l'integrite des faisceaux de la substance blanche. Une eétude plus reécente de patients, entre 3 et 9 mois post-AVC, rapportait que l'integrite des faisceaux descendants de la substance blanche dans les BPCI etait corrélee de maniere plus significative a la fonction motrice du membre superieur que les mesures obtenues a partir des donnees d'IRMf [22].

2.7. Au-delà du faisceau corticospinal

Le degré lesionnel du faisceau corticospinal est etroitement lie a la recuperation motrice fonctionnelle, mais d'autres voies motrices de la substance blanche pourraient jouer un role potentiel. L'integrite des fibres motrices indirectes et transcalleuses pourrait se reéveéler importante pour la reécupeération.

Une des hypotheses emises, basee principalement sur des donnees d'imagerie de modeles animaux, est que ces fibres motrices indirectes seraient constitueées des voies corticoru-brospinale et corticoreticulospinale (Fig. 2). Une etude récente sur 18 patients en phase chronique post-AVC, rapportait que l'integrite structurelle du faisceau corticospinal ipsilesionnel ainsi que des fibres motrices indirectes ipsileésionnelles eétait lieée de maniere significative a la fonction motrice du membre superieur, mesurée a l'aide du test de fonction motrice de Wolf (WMFT) [23]. Une etude similaire sur 15 patients en phase chronique rapportait que la FA mesureée dans le corpus callosum, connectant les cortex moteurs primaires de chaque hemisphere, etait egalement liee a la fonction motrice du membre superieur evaluee a l'aide du WMFT, et a la réponse a la therapie [24].

Les voies motrices descendantes controleésionnelles ont egalement un role a jouer dans le contrôle des muscles proximaux du membre pareétique. Reécemment, des eétudes se sont focaliseées sur la contribution potentielle des voies motrices controlesionnelles a la marche. Jang et al. ont examine les faisceaux corticospinal et corticoréticulaire dans les deux hemispheres de 54 patients en phase chronique [25]. Ils rapportent que le nombre de fibres dans le faisceau corticoréticulaire controlesionnel etait lie a la capacite de marche, evaluee a l'aide de l'echelle de classification fonctionnelle de la marche (Functional Ambulation Category). D'autres voies motrices indirectes, comme la voie corticoreticulospinale contraleésion-nelle, pourraient contribuer a la recuperation proximale du membre superieur, tout particulierement quand le faisceau corticospinal ipsilesionnel a ete très endommagé [26].

Toutes ensemble, ces eétudes reécentes indiquent que la prediction de la recuperation motrice après AVC pourrait integrer de maniere pertinente revaluation des voies motrices

au sein des deux hémisphères, y compris les faisceaux corticorubrospinal et corticorèticulospinal. Cependant, a ce jour, les etudes concernaient les patients en phase chronique de l'AVC. La pertinence d'examiner les autres voies motrices pendant la phase subaigue doit etre validee par des etudes complementaires.

2.8. Mesures combinées

L'algorithme PREP est actuellement la seule approche associant les mesures cliniques, neurophysiologiques et de neuroimagerie de maniere sequentielle. Les etudes plus récentes ont compare la habilite pronostique des mesures de TMS et d'IRM de diffusion. Dans leur etude, Jang et al. utilisaient la TMS et la tractographie pour etudier 54 patients souffrant d'hemorragie intracerebrale et de faiblesse musculaire severe. Les donnees TMS et d'IRM etaient collectees dans les 4 semaines suivant l'AVC, et etaient corrélees a l'index de motricite du membre superieur a 6 mois post-AVC [27]. Comme prévu, les patients ayant des PME dans le membre superieur parétique, et un faisceau corticospinal intact visualise a la tractographie, montraient une meilleure recuperation motrice. Ces auteurs rapportent egalement un pouvoir prédictif positif plus grand pour la TMS, alors qu'un pouvoir prédictif negatif plus grand etait retrouve pour la tractographie, ce résultat etait de nouveau confirme par ces memes auteurs dans une etude ulterieure [28]. Toutes ces etudes soulignent que la neuroimagerie se révele particulierement utile dans l'identification des patients sans PME qui n'ont egalement aucun potentiel de recuperation motrice, conformement a l'algorithme PREP.

2.9. Conclusions et directions futures

Fig. 2. La voie du faisceau corticospinal et des fibres motrices indirectes (FMi). Visualisation du faisceau corticospinal et des Fmi descendants du cortex moteur jusqu'au pont. Le faisceau corticospinal est en rouge et en jaune, les FMi vont du bleu fonceé au bleu clair, et les fibres transcalleuses reliant le M1 droit au M1 gauche sont en vert. La position de la voie des FMi rejoint l'hypothèse que les voies corticorubrospinale et corticoreticulospinale constituent les FMi. Reproduit avec permission [24].

L'association des mesures neurophysiologiques et de neuroimagerie peut ameiiorer le pouvoir prédictif [27,28]. Cependant, obtenir toutes ces donnees et ceci pour tous les patients est un processus complique et coûteux. L'algorithme PREP préconise des mesures combines sequentielles, en commencant avec un simple examen clinique au lit du malade. Les donnees TMS et d'IRM sont seulement requises dans le cas de résultats incertains. Les recherches confirment le bien fonde de cette approche. L'algorithme PREP est un exemple de la facon dont les predictions fiables peuvent etre faites pour chaque patient, dans le but de concevoir des programmes de reeducation adequats. Les algorithmes tels que le PREP, peuvent egalement renforcer l'elaboration d'etudes cliniques contrôles portant sur de nouvelles therapies ayant pour but d'ameliorer la recuperation motrice post-AVC. Par exemple, le fait de determiner l'integrite du faisceau corticospinal d'un patient donne va prédire sa réponse a la neuromodulation corticale non invasive du M1 pendant la phase chronique de l'AVC [29]. Cet element pourrait se reveler essentiel pour la stratification des patients, tout specifiquement dans les etudes a faible effectif comme cela peut etre le cas en reeducation. Ce processus de stratification a ete reconnu comme essentiel dans les etudes portant sur des therapeutiques experimentales [30].

Actuellement, il n'existe aucun algorithme pouvant preédire la reécupeération fonctionnelle du membre supeérieur, bien que des preuves récentes indiquent que les mesures des PME et de la FA pourraient se reéveéler pertinentes. Des eétudes suppleémentaires sont neécessaires pour deéterminer si de telles techniques peuvent etre utilisees et combinees rapidement apres l'AVC dans le but d'ameliorer le pronostic de recuperation fonctionnelle de la marche.

Declaration d'intérêts

Les auteurs declarent ne pas avoir de conflits d'interêts en relation avec cet article.

References

[1] WHO. The global burden of disease: 2004 update. Geneva: World Health Organization; 2004.

[2] Roger VL, Go AS, Lloyd-Jones DM, Benjamin EJ, Berry JD, Borden WB, et al. Heart disease and stroke statistics 2012 update: a report from the American Heart Association. Circulation 2012;125:e2-20.

[3] Veerbeek JM, Kwakkel G, van Wegen EE, Ket JC, Heymans MW. Early prediction of outcome of activities of daily living after stroke: a systematic review. Stroke 2001;42:1482-8.

[4] Levin MF, Kleim JA, Wolf SL. What do motor ''recovery'' and "compensation" mean in patients following stroke? Neurorehabil Neural Repair 2009;23:313-9.

[5] Stinear CM. Prediction of recovery of motor function after stroke. Lancet Neurol 2010;9:1228-32.

[6] Stinear CM, Barber PA, Petoe M, Anwar S, Byblow WD. The PREP algorithm predicts potential for upper limb recovery after stroke. Brain 2012;135:2427-535.

[7] Nijland RH, van Wegen EE, Harmeling-van der Wel BC, Kwakkel G. Accuracy of physical therapists' early predictions of upper-limb function in hospital stroke units: The EPOS study. Phys Ther 2013;93:460-9.

[8] Veerbeek JM, Van Wegen EE, Harmeling-Van der Wel BC, Kwakkel G. Is accurate prediction of gait in nonambulatory stroke patients possible within 72 hours poststroke?: The EPOS study. Neurorehabil Neural Repair 2011;25:268-74.

[9] Dimyan MA, Cohen LG. Contribution of transcranial magnetic stimulation to the understanding of functional recovery mechanisms after stroke. Neurorehabil Neural Repair 2010;24:125-35.

[10] Pizzi A, Carrai R, Falsini C, Martini M, Verdesca S, Grippo A. Prognostic value of motor evoked potentials in motor function recovery of upper limb after stroke. J Rehabil Med 2009;41:654-60.

[11] Di Lazzaro V, Profice P, Pilato F, Capone F, Ranieri F, Pasqualetti P, et al. Motor cortex plasticity predicts recovery in acute stroke. Cereb Cortex 2010;20:1523-8.

[12] SchiemanckSK, Kwakkel G, PostMW, KappelleLJ, Prevo AJ. Predicting long-term independency in activities of daily living after middle cerebral artery stroke: does information from MRI have added predictive value compared with clinical information? Stroke 2006;37:1050-4.

[13] Puig J, Pedraza S, Blasco G, Daunis IEJ, Prados F, Remollo S, et al. Acute damage to the posterior limb of the internal capsule on diffusion tensor tractography as an early imaging predictor of motor outcome after stroke. AJNR Am J Neuroradiol 2011;32:857-63.

[14] Jayaram G, Stagg CJ, Esser P, Kischka U, Stinear J, Johansen-Berg H. Relationships between functional and structural corticospinal tract integrity and walking post stroke. Clin Neurophysiol 2012;123:2422-8.

[15] Zhu LL, Lindenberg R, Alexander MP, Schlaug G. Lesion load of the corticospinal tract predicts motor impairment in chronic stroke. Stroke 2010;41:910-5.

[16] Kou N, Park CH, Seghier ML, Leff AP, Ward NS. Can fully automated detection of corticospinal tract damage be used in stroke patients? Neurology 2013;80:2242-5.

[17] Riley JD, Le V, Der-Yeghiaian L, See J, Newton JM, Ward NS, et al. Anatomy of stroke injury predicts gains from therapy. Stroke 2011;42: 421-6.

[18] Lindenberg R, Renga V, Zhu LL, Betzler F, Alsop D, Schlaug G. Structural integrity of corticospinal motor fibers predicts motor impairment in chronic stroke. Neurology 2010;74:280-7.

[19] Puig J, Blasco G, Daunis IEJ, Thomalla G, Castellanos M, Figueras J, et al. Decreased corticospinal tract fractional anisotropy predicts long-term motor outcome after stroke. Stroke 2013;44:2016-8.

[20] Koyama T, Tsuji M, Nishimura H, Miyake H, Ohmura T, Domen K. Diffusion tensor imaging for intracerebral hemorrhage outcome prediction: comparison using data from the corona radiata/internal capsule and the cerebral peduncle. J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis 2013;22:72-9.

[21] Marshall RS, Zarahn E, Alon L, Minzer B, Lazar RM, Krakauer JW. Early imaging correlates of subsequent motor recovery after stroke. Ann Neurol 2009;65:596-602.

[22] Qiu M, Darling WG, Morecraft RJ, Ni CC, Rajendra J, Butler AJ. White matter integrity is a stronger predictor of motor function than BOLD response in patients with stroke. Neurorehabil Neural Repair 2011;25: 275-84.

[23] Ruber T, Schlaug G, Lindenberg R. Compensatory role of the cortico-rubro-spinal tract in motor recovery after stroke. Neurology 2012;79:515-22.

[24] Lindenberg R, Zhu LL, Ruber T, Schlaug G. Predicting functional motor potential in chronic stroke patients using diffusion tensor imaging. Hum Brain Mapp 2012;33:1040-51.

[25] Jang SH, Chang CH, Lee J, Kim CS, Seo JP, Yeo SS. Functional role of the corticoreticular pathway in chronic stroke patients. Stroke 2013;44: 1099-104.

[26] Bradnam LV, Stinear CM, Barber PA, Byblow WD. Contralesional hemisphere control of the proximal paretic upper limb following stroke. Cereb Cortex 2012;22:2662-71.

[27] Jang SH, Ahn SH, Sakong J, Byun WM, Choi BY, Chang CH, et al. Comparison of TMS and DTT for predicting motor outcome in intracere-bral hemorrhage. J Neurol Sci 2010;290:107-11.

[28] Kwon YH, Son SM, Lee J, Bai DS, Jang SH. Combined study of transcranial magnetic stimulation and diffusion tensor tractography for prediction of motor outcome in patients with corona radiata infarct. J Rehabil Med 2011;43:430-4.

[29] O'Shea J, Boudrias MH, Stagg CJ, Bachtiar V, Kischka U, Blicher JU, et al. Predicting behavioural response to TDCS in chronic motor stroke. Neuroimage 2013. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2013.05.096.

[30] Burke E, Cramer SC. Biomarkers and predictors of restorative therapy effects after stroke. Curr Neurol Neurosci Rep 2013;13:329.