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Abstract of research paper on Agriculture, forestry, and fisheries, author of scientific article — Gökhan Demircioğlu, Mustafa Yadigaroğlu

Abstract The purpose of this study is to investigate understanding levels of high school students, chemistry student teachers and prospective science teachers on the gas concepts. The sample consists of 107 chemistry student teachers, 141 prospective science teachers and 40 high school students. A test involving 16 questions is used to collect data. The results show that there are significant differences between the means of high school students, the means of chemistry student teachers and prospective science teachers in favor of the high school students and student teachers have alternative conceptions that are similar to those of the high school students.

Academic research paper on topic "A Comparison of Level of Understanding of Student Teachers and High School Students Related to the Gas Concept"

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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences 116 (2014) 2890 - 2894 —

5th World Conference on Educational Sciences - WCES 2013

A Comparison of Level of Understanding of Student Teachers and High School Students Related to the Gas

Concept

Gokhan DEMiRCiOGLUa, Mustafa YADiGAROGLUb*

ab Karadeniz Technical University, Fatih Faculty of Education, Trabzon, 61335, Turkey

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to investigate understanding levels of high school students, chemistry student teachers and prospective science teachers on the gas concepts. The sample consists of 107 chemistry student teachers, 141 prospective science teachers and 40 high school students. A test involving 16 questions is used to collect data. The results show that there are significant differences between the means of high school students, the means of chemistry student teachers and prospective science teachers in favor of the high school students and student teachers have alternative conceptions that are similar to those of the high school students.

© 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

Selection and/or peer-review under responsibility of Academic World Education and Research Center. Keywords: Chemistry Education, Gas Concept, Chemistry Student Teacher, Prospective Science Teacher

1. Introduction

It is known that chemistry is one of the most difficult subjects for students to learn in schools (Demircioglu, Ayas, & Demircioglu, 2005). Therefore, many students at all levels struggle to understand chemistry concepts, but they are often unsuccessful (Nakhleh, 1992). Most important reason of this is that chemistry consists of many abstract concepts requiring more mental thinking (Reid, 2000). As a result, students hold a lot of misconceptions about many basic chemistry concepts. Research in science education has been well documented students' misconceptions in a wide range of science concepts. One of these concepts is gas and its related concepts (Benson et al., 1993; Birinci-Konur & Ayas, 2010; Gurses et al., 2002; Novick & Nussbaum, 1981; Stavy, 1988). These studies have showed that students hold common misconceptions about the gas concept. Stavy (1988) has found out that some students think that gas has no weight and some believe that gas is lighter than the same material in its liquid or solid state. Gurses et. al. (2002) has explored that some students think that gases do not mix and gases are evaporated substance. There is a variety of sources of misconceptions such as personal experiences, gender, peer interaction, language, textbook, laboratory procedures, etc. Similarly, some teachers have served as a source of misconceptions (Wandersee, Mintzes, & Novak, 1994). Bradley and Mosimege

* Corresponding author. Tel.: Mustafa YADIGAROGL +90-462- 377-7324 fax:+90-462-248-7344. E-mail address: mustafayadigaroglu@hotmail.com

1877-0428 © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

Selection and/or peer-review under responsibility of Academic World Education and Research Center. doi:10.1016/j.sbspro.2014.01.675

(1998) suggest that many science teachers have misconceptions about basic science concepts. Also, Akgun (2009) has found out that some student teachers have some misconceptions about dissolution, solubility and diffusion concepts. Teachers and student teachers may transfer their misconceptions to students. Hence, it is very important to determine misconceptions of student teachers and high school students on basic science concepts.

The aim of this study is to investigate the understanding levels and alternative conceptions of high school students, chemistry student teachers and prospective science teachers on the gas concepts.

2. Method

The method of the present study is determined as a cross-sectional research because the present study aims to assess conceptual differences of students of different age groups at the same time. Cross-sectional studies consist of studying groups of students in different age groups at the same point in time rather than studying the same groups. The present study has been conducted with 107 chemistry student teachers, 141 science student teachers and 40 high school students in Trabzon.

2.1. Data Collection Tool

In the study, Gases Concept Achievement Test (GCAT) containing 16 questions, 10 of which are multiple-choice and 5 are two-tier questions and one question requiring drawing is used. This test aims to determine students' conceptual understanding of the gas concept. Some of the items in the GCAT are taken from literature (Chiu, 2001) and some of them are taken from chemistry question banks. Multiple-choice, two-tier questions are not similarly scored. Students are given 3 points for each correct answer in multiple-choice and 4 points for each correct answer in two-tier questions. Scoring is not done for drawing requiring question. The total score for the test is 50 points. GCAT is piloted with 50 students and Cronbach's Alpha Reliability coefficient of the test is found as 0.78.

3. Results and Discussion

The mean scores and standard deviations of the test for the H.S.S, P.S.T, and the C.S.T are presented in Table 1. As seen in Table 1, the highest mean belongs to the high school students (M=25.07; S.D: 5.15). The means of the prospective science teachers (M=20.68; S.D: 7.00) and chemistry student teachers (M=20.38; S.D= 6.93) are very close to each other.

Table 1. The mean scores and standard deviations on the test

N Mean Std.Dev.

H.S.S 40 25.07 5.15

P.S.T 141 20.68 7.00

C.S.T 107 20.38 6.93

H.S.S: High School Student P.S.T: Prospective Science Teacher C.S.T: Chemistry Student Teacher

The ANOVA is used to test the statistically significant differences among the means of groups. Tukey's HSD post hoc test is used in order to determine which groups differ from each other. The ANOVA and Tukey's HSD results are presented in Table 2.

Table 2. Summary of one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's HSD test

Sum of df Mean F Tukey's

Squares Square P HSD

Between Groups Within Groups 704.56 12620.82 2 277 352.28 45.563 7.73 H.S.S-P.S.T H.S.S-C.S.T

Total 13325.39 279

As shown in Table 2, the results of ANOVA and Tukey's HSD show that there are statistically significant differences between the means of high school students (X=25.07; SD=5.15) and the means of chemistry student teachers (X=20.38; SD= 6.93) and prospective science teachers (X=20.68; SD= 7.00) in favor of the high school students (F(2;277)= 7.73; p=0.01).

16th question of the test is examined below in details, because it requires drawing.

Question 16. The diagram represents a cross-sectional area of a rigid sealed steel tank filled with hydrogen gas at 20oC and 3 atm pressures. The dots represent the distribution of all the hydrogen molecules in the tank.

a) Illustrate one probable distribution of molecules of hydrogen gas in the

sealed steel tank if the temperature is decreased from 20oC to -5oC

b) Illustrate one probable distribution of molecules of hydrogen gas in the sealed steel tank if the temperature is increased from 20oC to 80 oC

(The boiling point of hydrogen is -242.8 oC).

Examples of wrong diagrams drawn by students are given below.

P.S.T 57 40.4

C.S.T 40 37.3

H.S.S 30 75

Diagram 1

Diagram drawn by the students for item b

P.S.T 62 43.9

C.S.T 48 44.8

H.S.S 27 67.5

Diagram drawn by the students for item a

Diagram 2

75% of high school students, 40.4% of prospective science teachers, and 37.3% of chemistry student teachers have drawn the shape in diagram 1 for item a. 67.5% of high school students, 43.9% of prospective science teachers, and 44.8% of chemistry student teachers have drawn the shape in diagram 2 for item b.

The aim of this study is to compare the understanding levels of high school students and student teachers concerning the subject of "gas". The results of the GCAT show that high school students are more successful than the others. One reason for this can probably be that high school students have more classes to get prepared for the university entrance exam and have recently studied the gases topic. But the result is still surprising. Another result derived from the study is that the student teachers hold some misconceptions about the gas concept. It is not surprising when it is compared with the earlier studies (Bradley & Mossimege, 1998; Demircioglu et al., 2004). The results also show that some of student teachers and high school students hold same misconceptions. For example, in question 16, participants have similar drawings (see diagram 1 and 2) including an alternative conception. The finding is consistent with the results of previous studies on the gas concept (Benson et. al. 1993; Qalik & Ayas, 2005; Hwang, 1995; Stavy, 1990).

4. Conclusion and Suggestion

The purpose of the present study is to compare the understanding levels and alternative conceptions of high school students and student teachers concerning the gas concept. The results show that the participants in all groups have a number of alternative conceptions. The most important result obtained from the study is that the alternative conceptions about the gas concept held by the student teachers of chemistry and science are remarkably similar to the ones held by the high school students. The result is supported with the earlier studies (Stocklmayers & Treagust, 1996). Teacher educators should be aware of student teachers' problematic areas and should design teacher training programmes to help them to bridge the gap between their alternative conceptions and scientific views. Similarly, teachers should be aware of their students' alternative conceptions and integrate teaching technologies such as animations or simulations into their courses while teaching difficult abstract gas concepts, which are sometimes alternative conceptions. Also, curriculum developers should take into consideration students' alternative conceptions when developing chemistry curriculum. Studies that explore learning difficulties in basic science concepts can contribute to develop more effective teaching methods.

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