Scholarly article on topic 'A systematic cross sectional analysis of celebrity chef recipes targeting healthy eating: Is there cause for concern?'

A systematic cross sectional analysis of celebrity chef recipes targeting healthy eating: Is there cause for concern? Academic research paper on "Health sciences"

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Academic research paper on topic "A systematic cross sectional analysis of celebrity chef recipes targeting healthy eating: Is there cause for concern?"

agreed with fast food company sponsorship of children's sports events). There were mixed views about what actions governments should take to control food marketing (82% supported clearer food content on food labels, 79% believed children should learn how to purchase and cook foods at school). Conclusions: A substantial majority of Vietnamese household food providers appeared to be unaware of adverse effects of food marketing. Education and policy leadership in food and nutrition are urgently required. Funding source(s): Deakin University and Vietnamese Government Postgraduate Scholarship.

A TRANSFERENCE TO FAVOURABLE FOOD MANAGEMENT PRACTICES BY YOUNG WOMEN WHO PARTICIPATED IN A PORK-MEAT INTERVENTION TRIAL

J.O. McArthur1, S. Samman1.1 Discipline Nutrition and Metabolism, School of Molecular Bioscience, The University of Sydney, Australia E-mail: jennifer.mcarthur@sydney.edu.au (J.O. McArthur)

Background/Aims: Studies report young women consume < RDI for iron however reporting of their meal patterning and food choices that impede iron absorption is lacking. This study aims to identify self-determined food management actions by young women that can maximize iron absorption from meals.

Methods: Participants consumed for 12 weeks their habitual (H) or pork-enriched (PE) diet by incorporating pork-meat (500 g /week; fresh weight) into their diets, replacing foods of their choosing, provided no interference with current red-meat intake. Each maintained food diaries for 21 days. Food frequency questionnaire and 4-weekly plasma iron biomarkers monitored nutrient intake and iron status, respectively. Changes in consumption pattern, meal style, cooking method and food selection were analysed using SPSS-v19 and NVivo-v10.

Results: The mean ± SD age and BMI of the 36 participants were 25.2 ± 4.2 years and 21.9 ± 2.2 kg/m2 respectively. At baseline there were no significant differences between macronutrient and total iron intakes for H and PE. The PE group established new meal patterns within 4 weeks (p = 0.002); omitted less meals (p = 0.001); changed meal style (p = 0.001); increased pork-meat intake by 4 meals (median) /week (range 3-5) by replacing low-iron alternatives such as oats, nuts, tea, cocoa, and coffee, moving them to mid-meals; and had a tendency to introduce more vegetables with meals. Conclusions: Young women provided with pork meat (as a raw ingredient) altered their food management patterns in a manner that was consistent with increasing the bioavailability of iron. Funding source(s): Pork CRC.

IS DISSEMINATION THE 'WEAKEST LINK' IN THE 2013 AUSTRALIAN DIETARY GUIDELINES PROCESS? INSIGHTS ON GP AWARENESS

A.S. Lawrence1. 1 Dairy Australia, Level 5, IBM Centre, 60 City Road,

Southbank, VIC, Australia

E-mail: alawrence@dairyaustralia.com.au

Background/Aims: General practitioners (GPs) are a target audience for the 2013 ADG. However, to date, published data on GP familiarity with these guidelines is non-existent.

Aim: To investigate awareness of the ADG among GPs and to compare it with awareness among a non-targeted audience (the general population). Methods: Two on-line surveys were conducted: a GP survey (n = 300,180 males, 50% response rate) during April 2014 and a general adult survey (n = 1,635, 810 males, 11% response rate) during March 2014. GP participants were similar to the Australian GP population for age, gender and state distribution. Weighting in the general survey ensured gender and age representativeness. Z-tests assessed differences.

Results: GPs gave nutrition advice in 31% (SEM 1.4) of consultations. Median self-rated nutrition knowledge was 7 (scale: 0 = not knowledgeable, 10 = extremely knowledgeable). Overall, 13% of GPs were familiar with the ADG, with higher awareness among females than males (22% vs. 7% p < 0.05). The new ADG minimum recommended daily serves of the dairy food group for teens, women over 50 and men over 70 years were correctly recalled by 7%, 17% and 7% of GPs, respectively. Among the general population, 12% were aware of the ADG, with higher awareness among females than males (14% vs. 10% p < 0.05).

Conclusions: Despite GPs being listed as a target audience, only 1 in 8 GPs are aware of the 2013 ADG, a level similar to that of the general population. This study highlights a need for further targeted dissemination of the 2013 ADGs to GPs.

Funding source(s): Dairy Australia.

NUTRITION PROFESSIONAL INVOLVEMENT IN MEDICAL SCHOOLS, OR LACK THEREOF: PRELIMINARY FINDINGS FROM A DESCRIPTIVE STUDY

K. Jukic .1 Sydney Medical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of Sydney, Australia

E-mail: katherine.Jukic@sydney.edu.au

Background/Aims: The lack of nutrition experts is a constraint in integrating more nutrition in medical curricula. The aim of this study is to determine the nature of, and attitudes around, Nutrition Professional (NP) involvement within medical schools/programs, compared to Non-Nutrition Professionals (NNPs).

Methods: In the absence of information about NP and NNP populations in medical schools, two online questionnaires (for NPs and NNPs) were emailed to academic and other non-administrative staff within 51 Australian, US and UK medical schools. Members of four dietetic/nutrition-related professional associations were notified of the survey. Responses to quantitative elements of questionnaire items were calculated as percentages.

Results: Responses were received from 613 NPs and 516 NNPs, of which 193 and 367, respectively, satisfied eligibility criteria for inclusion in the study. The proportion of NP and NNP respectively, who were involved in the following activities are: leadership 11%, 26%; coordination 34%, 47%; curriculum decision making 38%, 51%; teaching in a nutrition subject 74%, 18%; clinical training 27%, 47%; research supervision 21%, 52%; and mentoring 29%, 55%. Twelve percent of NP as well as NNP participants thought that NP involvement in their medical program was sufficient. NPs and NNPs differed in views about NP involvement in research (86% vs. 74%) and curriculum development (79% vs. 57%). Key barriers around NP involvement included funding, congested curriculum, expertise, accessibility, and perceived importance of nutrition.

Conclusions: Results from this group suggest that proportionately less NPs (than NNPs) are involved in non-teaching activities, yet most NPs and NNPs seem to favour increased involvement. Strategies to address associated barriers warrant further investigation. Funding source(s): N/A.

A SYSTEMATIC CROSS SECTIONAL ANALYSIS OF CELEBRITY CHEF RECIPES TARGETING HEALTHY EATING: IS THERE CAUSE FOR CONCERN?

M. Pelinovskaia1, R. Clarke1, R.J.S. Costa1. 1 Department of Nutrition & Dietetics, Monash University, VIC, Australia E-mail: ricardo.costa@monash.edu (R.J.S. Costa)

Background/Aims: It has previously been reported that 87% of Celebrity Chef (CC) recipes randomly sampled from the public domain fall substantially short of healthy eating benchmark guidelines. We aimed to systematically analyse CC recipes targeting healthy eating and weight loss; and compared the nutritional composition of these recipes against healthy eating standards.

Methods: Australian and British CC recipes (n = 333) were systematically and randomly selected from freely available resources in the public domain and analysed using dietary analysis software (FoodWorks, version 7). The nutritional composition of standard recipes (SR, n = 201) and recipes specifically aimed at healthy eating and weight loss (HR, n = 132) were determined; and compared against nutritional standards and a research-generated healthy eating index (HEI). Recipes were blindly analysed by a second researcher (CV < 1.0%). Data were analysed using an independent sample t-test and Mann-Whitney test. Results: Sixty nine percent of SR and 64% HR resulted in a negative HEI, with no difference between SR and HR observed, including within CC analysis. SR presented higher energy content per suggested serving compared with HR (1870 ± 984 kJ vs. 1518±972 kJ; p = 0.001), but not per 100 g portion. No differences were seen for total fat, SFA, sugar and salt per serving and per 100 g portion between SR and HR. Within CC analysis only

showed a difference in salt content per serving between SR and HR (2.2 ± 2.1 g vs. 1.4 ± 1.2 g; p = 0.010).

Conclusions: Standard CC recipes or CC recipes targeting healthy eating and weight loss do not differ; and do not meet healthy eating benchmark guidelines.

Funding source(s): N/A.

THE IMPORTANCE OF TASTE ON DIETARY CHOICE, BEHAVIOUR AND INTAKE IN A GROUP OF UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

S. Kourouniotis \ R.S.J. Keast \ S. Cicerale \1 School of Exercise and Nutrition

Sciences, Deakin University, VIC, Australia

E-mail: sara.cicerale@deakin.edu.au (S. Kourouniotis)

Background/Aims: Overweight and obesity prevalence is on the rise within Australia and evidence suggests that excess energy intake is a major contributor to this excess weight gain. Foods high in energy-density contribute to excess energy intake, as they tend to be more palatable and have been associated with increased food consumption. The 'taste of food' has been considered an important factor influencing food choice in previous international research.

Methods: Participants were recruited from Deakin University, Melbourne. A food frequency questionnaire and a Food and Diet questionnaire were used to assess intake frequency of food consumption over the prior month and to assess dietary behaviours such as how important taste was on food choice within the student population.

Results: The study included 1,306 participants (mean ± SD BMI 22.3 ± 3.2, age 20.5 ± 4.5 years, female = 1,026, 84% Australian). Taste was rated the most important factor influencing food choice (82%), followed by quality (81%), cost (47.6%) and ease of preparation (37%). Correlation analysis revealed weak, negative correlations between taste importance and BMI (n = 1,205, r = -0.003, p < 0.05), weak positive correlations between taste importance and gender (n = 1281, r = 0.127, p < 0.01); eating 5 serves of vegetables daily (n = 1290, r = 0.005, p < 0.01); eating 2 serves of fruit daily (n = 1291, r = 0.011, p < 0.01); consumption of convenience meals (n = 1290, r = 0.015, p < 0.05) and takeaway (n = 1290, r = 0.058, p < 0.05). Conclusions: Taste was considered an important factor in food choice, however only weak associations between taste importance and demographics, BMI, dietary behaviours and dietary intake were found. This suggests that other factors may play a stronger role in food consumption within the student population. Funding source(s): N/A.

POOR KNOWLEDGE ABOUT GESTATIONAL WEIGHT GAIN LIMITS PROVISION OF COUNSELLING BY MATERNITY CARE PROVIDERS: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

E. Gorman1, T. Billing1, C.J. Lucas1, Y. Probst1, K.E. Charlton1. 1 School of Medicine, University of Wollongong NSW, Australia E-mail: eg336@uowmail.edu.au (E. Gorman)

Background/Aims: Excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) is associated with a number of adverse pregnancy outcomes. Women receiving appropriate weight gain advice from their maternity care provider are more likely to gain weight within recommended ranges. Evidence suggests that relatively few women receive appropriate counselling. This study aimed to explore factors that influence whether information on appropriate GWG is provided to pregnant women by midwives and other maternity care providers.

Methods: A systematic literature review using Scopus, Web of Science and Medline databases (2004-2014) was conducted in May 2014. Peer-reviewed English language studies from western countries exploring maternity care providers' knowledge of and practices related to GWG were included.

Results: Twenty one studies were included. Maternity care providers believed GWG to be an important obstetric issue but lacked knowledge regarding correct body mass index classification and appropriate GWG targets. Inadequate knowledge of GWG was cited as a frequent barrier to the provision of counselling. Providers with a high self-perceived knowledge of GWG were more likely to include this topic in their counselling of pregnant women. To improve GWG knowledge maternity care

providers expressed a desire for further training and education. Interactive problem based learning was cited as a favourable model for future education.

Conclusions: Maternity care providers may refrain from offering, or provide incorrect, GWG advice, due to an inadequate understanding of the topic. Further understanding of this relationship and other barriers that may prevent provision of weight gain counselling is needed. Funding source(s): N/A.

MAKING HEALTHY FOOD CHOICES: A QUALITATIVE INVESTIGATION TO UNDERPIN THE E-ASSESSMENT OF NUTRITION LITERACY

J.A. Gifford1, A.M. Cassar2, H.T. O'Connor1,3, G.S. Denyer2. 1 Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Australia; 2 Faculty of Science, University of Sydney, Australia; 3 Charles Perkins Centre, University of Sydney, Australia

E-mail: janelle.gifford@sydney.edu.au (J.A. Gifford)

Background/Aims: Although sound nutrition literacy is considered pivotal to making healthy food choices, there is a lack of well-validated instruments to measure this construct. We aimed to determine the key elements required to assess nutrition literacy in Australian adults with an electronic tool (e-nutlit).

Methods: Twenty-eight experienced dietetic professionals from a range of work areas agreed to participate in one of six telephone focus groups. Semi-structured interview schedules were used to guide the groups which were recorded via conferencing facility and subsequently transcribed verbatim. Themes were identified using qualitative analysis software (NVivo 10, QSR International Pty Ltd, Melbourne, Australia, 2012). Results: Key elements identified to assess nutrition literacy included construction of the diet, knowledge of aspects of the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating and Australian Dietary Guidelines, knowledge of specific nutrients, elements of the nutrition information panel, and demographic characteristics (including belief systems and culture) incorporated based on their potential to influence nutrition literacy. Dialogue on factors that influence food choice focussed on marketing (including aspects of packaging and labelling), nutrition misconceptions, nutrition knowledge, and cultural influences.

Conclusions: This study provided rich data from a range of dietetic professionals on key elements to assess nutrition literacy in Australian adults. The broader results will inform the development and refinement of an e-nutlit tool. Assessment of, and raising nutrition literacy may assist in positively influencing healthy food choices. Funding source(s): NHF.

HEALTH STAR RATINGS OF REALITY TELEVISION FOOD PRODUCTS

R. Pearce .1 Lifestyle Research Centre, Avondale College of Higher Education,

Cooranbong, NSW, Australia

E-mail: robyn.pearce@avondale.edu.au

Background/Aims: The aim of this study is to investigate the Health Star Ratings (HSR) of the winning food products from the Australian version of the food product development reality television series, Recipe to Riches. Methods: The 11 winning products for 2013 were purchased from the supermarket chain involved in the television series. The Australian HSR system was used. Possible ratings range from % to 5 stars, where more stars indicate healthier products. All products were Category 2 non-dairy foods. Nutrition Information Panels provided required values per 100 g for energy, saturated fat, sugars, sodium for Baseline Points and protein for Modifying Points. Without full product specifications, fibre content per 100 g and percentage fruit, vegetables, nuts and legumes required for Modifying Points were estimated using fibre content of similar products and ingredient lists. For products with components to be consumed together, composite values were calculated. One product had three variants per pack and as each variant achieved the same rating, a single rating was allocated.

Results: Estimated HSR for the 11 products ranged from % to 4 stars with a relatively even spread across the range. The series winning product based on consumer purchases rated only % star. The use of estimated HSR in the current study requires caution.