Scholarly article on topic 'Christian Church and Economy'

Christian Church and Economy Academic research paper on "Philosophy, ethics and religion"

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Abstract of research paper on Philosophy, ethics and religion, author of scientific article — Adrian Ignat

Abstract Romania, as well as many other Eastern countries, is facing a pronounced economic crisis. For many countries, especially in the East, the risk of living like Greece, only from loans, will have repercussions in the future, for the next generations. Therefore, it is absolutely necessary to change our lifestyle, to replace our way of receiving goods, material satisfaction and unsubstantiated work, with receiving earned rewards for our hard labour. The loan, as it has been practiced in recent years, was an unnatural way toward progress and prosperity1. It is also true that many times, as we live in a society based on consumption, on valuing our material desires, we want to have more than we can truly cope with and more than is necessary2. Moderation in consumption, in life, is considered by many economists to be unproductive, economically unprofitable, because if we do not consume, we do not produce. But, is it not true that our resources and our Earth are wasted by the excessive consumption? Is waste good? Is this the specific Christian life? Holy Fathers always talk about moderation, lent and communion with God, with others and with all creation. Everybody should have respect for values and life, and this must be an essential part of our lives.

Academic research paper on topic "Christian Church and Economy"

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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences 92 (2013) 412 - 419 —

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Christian Church and Economy

Adrian Ignata *

_a Valahia University from Targovigte, Bd. Carol /, Nr. 2, Targovigte, 130024, Romania_

Abstract

Romania, as well as many other Eastern countries, is facing a pronounced economic crisis. For many countries, especially in the East, the risk of living like Greece, only from loans, will have repercussions in the future, for the next generations. Therefore, it is absolutely necessary to change our lifestyle, to replace our way of receiving goods, material satisfaction and unsubstantiated work, with receiving earned rewards for our hard labour. The loan, as it has been practiced in recent years, was an unnatural way toward progress and prosperity1.

It is also true that many times, as we live in a society based on consumption, on valuing our material desires, we want to have more than we can truly cope with and more than is necessary2. Moderation in consumption, in life, is considered by many economists to be unproductive, economically unprofitable, because if we do not consume, we do not produce. But, is it not true that our resources and our Earth are wasted by the excessive consumption? Is waste good? Is this the specific Christian life? Holy Fathers always talk about moderation, lent and communion with God, with others and with all creation. Everybody should have respect for values and life, and this must be an essential part of our lives.

© 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

Selection and/or peer-review under responsibility of Lumen Research Center in Social and Humanistic Sciences, Asociatia Lumen. Keywords: economical challenges; Christian Church; crisis; material goods; capitalism; ideology.

1. Introduction

* Corresponding author. Tel.: +0040724768255; fax: +0040245640083. E-mail address: adrianignatl974@yahoo.com

1 In the middle of the economic crisis, the bank loan, from the identity card to the estate loans, led the majority of the population, on the verge of despair. Many went into default; their purchased goods were taken by the bank (houses, cars etc.). Banks have turned from friends and help in need in real sharks, practicing a purely economic policy, without any remorse, for those who had credits.

2 In England 20% of the food that people buy, goes to the garbage. The same thing happens in the most developed countries, where people buy more than they consume, from the desire to have everything and even much more. See: http://derscanu.7ani.net/cata-mancare-aruncam-la-gunoi/

1877-0428 © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

Selection and/or peer-review under responsibility of Lumen Research Center in Social and Humanistic Sciences, Asociatia Lumen. doi:10.1016/j.sbspro.2013.08.694

Material goods represent a certain path in today's world and even a purpose in itself. As far as man was separated from God, so far did he direct his attention to temporal things, which, in his opinion, could replace God. The cosmos of contemporary human existence can often be found in phrases such as: economic welfare, living conditions and life, secularization3 and globalization etc. Contemporary man, called by some the recent man (Patapievici, 1995), is not Christ-lover4 or Christ-centred5, but selfish, self-centred, considering to be a "measure of all things"6. "By self-divinization, man is separated from God and his neighbour, while by Christian deification kept in the unit, or more precisely, he lives in the same being ("same-being") and eschatological restoration of unity" (Mantzaridis, 2002, p. 23).

Unfortunately, until now, the Orthodox Church has not made a scientific research on the relationship of Christian Church with the economical life of our society. This study comes from the necessity of Christian Church to show its social doctrine, to understand the social transformation of our society, mostly on the crisis period, to present the Christian understanding of material goods, according to the Gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ. For that reason, this paper will focus on the relationship Christian Church-economy, having some propositions for our society, which is confronted with several economical crises: moderation in consumption; lent; a new understanding of economical benefits, of material goods; the ethics in affairs; the perversion of moral and social values, and so forth.

Starting from the idea that the material goods are useful and they are gifts of God for human beings, I try to show how these goods can be used for common benefit, how the idea of stewardship can define our relationship with these goods, how the Christian Church understands the welfare or the moderation in consumption.

2. Methodology of research

The main goal of this article is to present a clear point of view on the relationship Church-economy on this life, even if the Orthodox Church has not realized it as a social doctrine. The reader will understand that the material goods are important not only for our own use, but the benefits of all people. On my analysis, I used the Christian and non-Christian studies, mostly published on Romania, to present the economical life from Christian point of view, using the modern theological methods of research and consulting various bibliographical sources in the field.

The methodology of research is based on the objective examination of various sources and presentation of clear conclusions, which can help us to understand the relationship between Church and economical challenges. The critical analyse of this relationship is expressed by the quotations from various writers, presented sometimes even as footnotes. In my research, I attempted to be equidistant, presenting the Christian point of view, generally, and Orthodox point of view, especially.

3 Secularization, according to the theologians, is an irreconcilable separation between religious and secular society. Alexander Schmemann considers secularization to be the reaction of the society against medieval Christian clericalism, and the most common form of human life is no secularization of public and private prayer. Other scholars defined secularization as individualistic type of human behaviour, as if death did not exist, or as if God did not exist (etsi dens non daretur). A development of the issue of Orthodox-Christian perspective was realized by Alexander Schmemann (1973). For the Life of the World. New York: St. Vladimir's Seminary Press, pp. 98-99 and 117; Pr. Gheorghe Popa (2000). Comuniune innoire spirituala in contextul secularizarii lumii moderne. Iasi: Trinitas Publishing House, p. 21.

4 Christopher - Christ bearers, as St Paul claimed: „Now I no longer live, but Christ lives in me" (Gal. 2, 20). „Christ, the new Adam, assumes „Adam in the whole human race", suffers for it, and it will lead to life through death" says Georgios I. Mantzaridis (2002). Globalizare universalitate. Himera adevar. translated by Prof. PhD. Vasile Raduca, Bucharest: Byzantine Publishing House, p 35. Christ is „the measure of all things, the divine and the human", Archimandrite Sophronius (1996). Sa-L vedem pe Dumnezeu a$a cum este. Essex, Third Edition, p. 254.

5 With Christ in the centre of his life, as Saint Justin Popovici (2010). Omul Dumnezeu-Omul. Abisurile si culmile fllosoflei. introductory study and translation: Prof. loan lea and Diac. loan I. Ica jr., Preface: Prof. Ioannis Karmiris, Second Edition, Bucharest: Sophia Publishing

6 Protagoras in Despre zei said that: „Man is the measure of all things: of those who are to be, of those that are not, because they are not. Human being is identical with what appears to someone". See at Lect. PhD. Ivan Ivlampie (2012). Elemente de teorie a valorilor in filosofia antica. Analele Universitdfii Dunarea de Jos, Galafi, Philosophy Series, p. 122.

About the organization of the material, I must say that the primary position is given to the understanding of material goods in our society and in the Christian Church. The secondary position is given to interpretation of various opinions about wealth and poverty, social justice and injustice, benefits and prejudices, and so forth. This kind of dialectic presentation can help us to understand how to use the material goods, the wealth for the benefit of entire society, of our neighbour. The entire paper tries to draw a light on this world of shadow and darkness, where the economical benefits and the power of money are generally recognised, but are not necessarily used for the benefit of all people.

3. Capitalism, economy and social ethics

In his book The Dynamics of Capitalism, Fernand Braudel asserts that the idea of capitalism is not unique to modernity and "has not only appeared in the sixteenth century (or eighteenth or nineteenth century, disputes relating to this timing no longer had any significance), but appeared in the functioning of the upper part of the economy, which has retained all the essential features of Antiquity to the modern world" (Braudel, 2002, p. 7).

Marked by the spirit of rebirth and enlightenment, human society began to develop theologies and philosophies of life which should serve interests that are subordinate to social modern and post-modern standards. "It certainly goes without saying that, all these scholars, who have a transient God (the theology of God's death, of hope, of revolution, of liberation, and so forth.), are clearly determined by the views and aspirations of their initiators. This is close to the so-called contextual theology" (Mantzaridis, 2006, p. 357).

Economy means moderation or enrichment of material goods to satisfy the needs of human life. In theological or religious meaning the term used is stewardship, expressing the administration or using resources wisely to meet the needs related to the specific intangible church work of the Church or to facilitate redemption7. Goods "were created by God and are given to the use and satisfaction of people" (Mantzaridis, 2006, p. 358).

From the beginning, Christian church adopted a positive attitude on material possessions. God is the creator and he made everything. Man is only what the administrator has received from his Creator. Possessions are gifts that God has made available to man for he, using them, can pass through this world, to reach the perfect haven in the Kingdom of God. If we first seek the Kingdom of God and His righteousness, everything else will be added (Matthew 6, 33).

If God is recognized as the Creator of the world, then material goods can not be bad8. In human history, in the first centuries after Christ, various Eastern heresies appeared, such as dualistic Gnostics, who believed that matter is evil in itself and not God, but some Demiurge created the world and man. On the opposite side are those who strive to collect goods and fortunes, even fraudulently, proving much greed and wickedness.

In the twentieth century, in the East, an atheistic ideology of Western tone9 appeared which had a wide area of distribution and marked the lives of many people. It's about communist ideology, which is likened by some to Christian teaching, especially in terms of material goods. If Christianity axiom is "all that is mine is also yours", the communist axiom is "anything that is yours is mine, too" (Stefanidu, 1951, p. 166). In Christianity, the common property is based on the free and spontaneous consent, while in communism is based on the outside imposition and coercion (Acts 5, 4). „Furthermore, the common property of Christianity recognizes God as the real master of goods, while common property in Communism granted this human quality" (Mantzaridis, 2006, p. 359).

4. Christian Church position on the material goods

7Pr. Prof. PhD Liviu Stan (1970). Iconomie çi intercomuniune. Orthodoxia, XXII, no. 1, p. 6; Pr. Prof. PhD Dumitra Stâniloae (1969). Iconomia dumnezeiascâ, temei al iconomiei bisericeçti. Orthodoxia, XXI, no. 1, pp. 3-24; Pr. Prof. PhD. Isidore Todoran (1955). Principiul iconomiei din punct de vedere dogmatic. Studii Teologice, VII, no. 3-4, pp. 139-149; Pr. Prof. PhD. Isidore Todoran (1969). Iconomia în Biserica Ortodoxâ. Bucharest; Jérôme Kotsonis, archevêque d'Athènes et de toute la Grèce (1971). Problèmes de l'économie ecclésiastique. Editions J. Duculot, S.A. Gembloux, Belgique; Arhim. Chesarie Gheorghescu (1980). învâtâtura ortodoxâ despre iconomia dumnezeiascâ fi iconomia bisericeascâ. Bucharest: Institutului Biblic çi de Misiune al Bisericii Ortodoxe Române Publishing House, p. 12.

8 We should say that the biblical quote said: „And God saw that it was good" (Gen. 1,8).

9 It was promoted by Karl Marx and F. Engels, Karl Marx, „The Communist Manifesto", in Karl Marx (1977). Selective Writings, edited by David McLellan, Oxford: Oxford University Press. We mention that Bible quotation: ,^nd God saw that it was good. " (Gen. 1,8).

Christian Church mission is salvation, the acquisition of eternal life. But eternal life begins here on earth, and is perfected in heaven. It penetrates and transforms our lives. Consequently, it has an impact on life on earth. Thus, in the history of the Christian Church, there were Christians who believed they must ignore all that is earthly, seeking to live only in God and desiring future happiness acquisition. It is the case of Christians in Thessalonica, who, waiting for the Saviour's coming, have ceased to work and worry about the problems of life, focusing on piety and ignoring practical action. "The truth is that eternal happiness is acquired through action, through the love of man to improve his earthly life to earthly happiness of man. Serve God by serving man" (Nicolae, 1969, p. 12).

Another group of Christians believe that between faith and everyday aspects of life there is no connection. They attend Church, but are guided by their own rules. They are, however, who Apostle James addresses, when he says "faith without deeds is dead" (James 2,22-26).

Other Christians believe that the Christian Church should be involved in the implementation of social programs - political, economic, cultural, creating prerequisites for a Christian policy or economy. From all this we can see clearly that in their attempt to analyze the relationship of the Church with society, some Christians felt the need to capture favourite aspects of personal or group interest. But "the Church is not the first factor of social development, it is not directly dealing with solving social problems, but the Church can support the progress of society, focusing on social borders on its religious-moral principles. The Christian, then, has the Christian moral principles (even in the dogmas of the Church), a general social character. What is said on the religious and moral level can be socially transposed and stated" (Nicolae, 1969, p. 13).

However, economy, thrift, capitalism and market economy values include the whole human race. Everyone centres their existence around economic values, taking into account the evolution of the economy, personal welfare and global economic crises, etc. "...The economy has strategic importance for the powerful people of the earth, as it may provide or support global hegemony, which is associated today with the idea of a world superpower" (Melas, 1999, p. 68).

Economic market, structured on supply-demand system stands in the contemporary society as the economic vector that establishes the extent of economic development. On the other hand, in an economic relationship, the investor aims to maximize profits, even resorting to compromises. In many cases, the "law of profit" takes over "moral laws". Thus, the infiltration of capitalist spirit in all fields of life was not beneficial. If in trade, industry and finance the basic law is that of profitability, not by the same law the politicians, priests, soldiers are guided and so forth, but on the interests of the people, by the laws of salvation, truth and honour.

In an analysis of the economic implications in the social and political fields, Fernand Braudel does not agree that the economy unequivocally determines them. He believes that "complex inter-relationship is one of unitary historical realities, which is not segmented on fragmented sectors" (Murgescu, 2002, p. 9). Therefore, worthy of consideration are not only some of the economic interferences in the field of the Christian Church, and vice versa, but the historical evolution of this relationship, as it appears from the very antithesis of materialspiritual, secular-sacred (Ries, 2000).

The picture, provided by the current world, presents it as divided between privileged and underprivileged, between rich and poor. "There is a universal society, like a normal hierarchical, an image, but easy to recognize it" (Braudel, 2002, p. 65). In analyzing this spectrum, the historian, after a comprehensive overview of events can discern or suggest to the reader to do so, and propose the origins of major issues as solutions to them.

A large part of human society believes that moving out of the current impasse can be achieved only by serving quantity that is money. Man, becoming a money slave, turns into a real consumption machine, losing his inner universe, forgetting worries and longing for God and identifying freedom with free movement and consumption. Thus, we reach the consumerism and globalization10, created by a secular society, where human

10 The economic analyses of the impact of globalization lead to conflicting results. Dollar and Kraay from the World Bank, shows that developing countries with the largest share of trade in GDP growth after 1980 experienced a more rapid growth and sustained performance to

life is confined between supply and demand - the market economy instruments. "Man's nature is greedy, never satisfied to collect riches or honours, or houses, or anything else that would cherish the taste of power or pleasure or personal significance" (Popescu, 2004, p. 200).

5. The meaning of life in the Christian Church

The meaning of life is the sense of living in God's kingdom, God's reflection and effort??, training and living on religious and moral values established by God and taught by Christ and the Church. It can not be thought of as a connection of man with the divinity as long as the first only considers his material welfare, which is acquired by any means. Profane invasion, in the sphere of the sacred, created a real imbalance, reflected primarily by loss of control over their lives and sliding into a satiety immanent life here and now.

With regard to the man who is always in an unbalanced state, he and the world are moving with quick steps to destruction, even to the souls' destruction. The first consequence of this delicate situation is the replacement value of non-values11, good and evil, belief and unbelief, love and hate. By this wild perversion of all that is good and beautiful in life, man, in his moments of lucidity, naturally asks: Why did we lose what was better, nicer and cleaner in their lives? How long will this imbalance exist?

It is true that very often, in difficult circumstances, where our stated position would be decisive for our lives, and for the lives of others, we fail to do anything but remain silent. We believe that for our own good, in our interest, it is better to witness the perversion of values, the ambiguity and absurdity, than take action.

A return to the values of the Christian Church, to serve the true God, is the remedy needed by human society, with the awareness of our own limitations and realizing our need of connecting with God, the Father of all humanity. Christ is the topos, the place where people realize unity and sanctification, or their unity in holiness. He is the new Adam, who restores human nature perverted by sin12.

6. Welfare or moderation in consumption

Promoting an openness to man and to society, the Church has always promoted a social doctrine that addresses all people, following the transformation of society through knowledge, love and justice. The Orthodox Church was able to maintain over the centuries the balance and the common sense in relation to all other aspects of social life. The mission held by the Church contributed to the smooth conduct of socio-economic activities,

their pre-globalization regarding those of developing countries not included in the process of globalization. These countries have lower income gap than developed countries. The study shows that there is no correlation between the change in the share of trade in GDP and the inequality between countries. However, absolute poverty decreased in globalised countries. On the other hand, the economist Rodrik from Harvard shows that domestic innovation demonstrated by equity investors is a more important factor for improving economic performance than the trade opening.

David Dollar & Aart Kraay (June 2001). Trade, Growth and Poverty, Development Research Group. World Bank. Dani Rodrik (July 2001). The Global Governance of Trade as if Development Really Mattered, included in the UN Development Program, Harvard University. George Soros (2002). Despre globalizare. translation by Silviu Lupescu, Iasi: Polirom Publishing House, p. 25. On the other hand, theologians, as Georgios Mantzaridis (2002). Globalizare §i Universalitate, Himera si Adevar. translated by Prof. PhD. Vasile Raduca, Bucharest: Bizantina Publishing House, assumed that globalization was a complex phenomenon that manifested at all levels. Globalization does not manifest itself only at the macroeconomic level, but permeates all micro structures, so every human person is breathing its destructive spirit, which is the spirit of money. Similarly, Arhid. Prof. PhD. John I. Ica jr. (2001). Provocarea globalizarii: mutajia umanului. Bisericd fi multiculturalitate in Europa sfarptului de mileniu, Cluj-Napoca: Cluj University Press, pp. 8-20.

11 Today, the true human values are intentionally kept in the shade. No, it is a mere elliptical quote caught in a suggestive elliptical form, but formal, designed just for the sake of linguistic extravagances, but it is a reality. Lack of substance, of consistency of these non-values is becoming increasingly visible over time (e.g. Dinu Paturica, the character from the novel by Nicolae Filimon, Ciocoii vechi noi). Values settle out on time. And for the man to have value, he must have deep down his moral values. The Romanian proverb: „To be human is so great, but chivalry is random" fully reflects this reality. Moreover, for every man, younger or older, better or less, the meeting with a value, with a genuine personality, with a true man, which is based on truth, justice and love, there remains no an echo. Are trademarks human values, which are based on Jesus' teaching values. It is impressive and worth remembering when Jean Valjean reunion, escaped convict with Bishop Bienvenu. Victor Hugo (2000). Les Miserables. Volume I-III, Bucharest: Cartex Publishing House.

12 St. Cyril of Alexandria writes: „As in the violation of the commandment to Adam and disobedience, the nature of humanity, which was in bloom, was sentenced..., in the same way, I reckon, by obedience and lightness of Christ.. .throughout nature will enter blessing and revival through the Spirit". St. Cyril of Alexandria (2000). Comentariu la Evanghelia Sfantului loan, translation, introduction and notes by Prof. PhD. Dumitru Staniloae, col. PSB, vol. 41, Bucharest: Institutul Biblic $i de Misiune al Bisericii Ortodoxe Romane Publishing House, p 729.

creating balance, and moral conduct. Thus, Orthodox Christianity helped create a social balance, generating spiritual and social values and undeniable progress.

With regard to the unbeliever welfare is seen as primarily material, for a theologian "well-being" is a state of mind, in the first instance. From the start, Church was concerned with the spiritual and material "well-being" of its believers, continually seeking to improve the social difficulties of those who are suffering (Harakas, 1992, p. 362). However, the Church did not make an ideal from the welfare, but wanted to use it in the common interest of all (Sandu, 2008, p. 203).

Nowadays, the economic principle defines almost everything. Turnover and profit obtained are for the contemporary man an evaluation criteria which guides a person. The top 100 richest people in the world is a way to present the wealth of the rich at the expense of those who are poor and helpless, to the detriment of populations who are often close to poverty. Moreover, some of these wealthy people have acquired their wealth not so fairly, specifically by fraudulent means13.

It is true that many times, living in a society based on consumption, valuing our material desires, we want to have more than we can cope with and than we need14. Moderation in consumption, in life, is considered by many economists to be unproductive, economically unprofitable, because if not consumed, nor produced. Do we not use excessive amounts of earth's resources? Is waste good? Is this a Christian way of life? Fathers always talk about moderation, fasting and communion with God, with others and with all creation. Only an economy based on need and not profit is likely to succeed, but it involves sacrifice and renunciation. You can not make discretionary goods. Real needs vary by vocation, but human independence is essential to any property (Evdokimov, 2003, p. 125). Respect for values and life for every man must be an essential part of our lives. "Beware of the love of money, said St. Paul, and be satiated with what you have, because God himself said: "I shall not leave you, nor forsake you" (Hebrew 13, 5).

7. Conclusion

People often say that: poverty is not an argument and wealth is not an obstacle to salvation. If we ask the rich, they will say that is a perfectly valid principle, and if we ask the poor, we shall see a contrary view15. In any case, the poverty itself was not a virtue, but to the poor the lowly door of God's kingdom is open. At the same time, the Saviour recommended to the rich man to sell his possessions and follow him (Matthew 19, 21). Personally, we think that those who really want to follow God is not focused goods, but on spiritual goods, valuable goods for spiritual salvation16. The eternal model for this attitude is Christ the Saviour who said: "Foxes have holes and birds of the air have nests, and the Son of Man has nowhere to lay his head" (Matthew 8,20).

Christianity has never abandoned people, especially when they faced various challenges of social, economic, political or other nature. Although Christian Church has not settled a social system, it often was

13 In order to justify this assertion, we must say that most of the rich people are involved in shady business with the state or other business that have tragic consequences for the poor. Father Lest. PhD. Dan Sandu (2008). Social Assistance - philanthropic vocation of the Church. Analele Stiintifice ale Universitatii „Alexandra loan Cuza ", Teologie Ortodoxa, Tome XIII, Ia§i, p. 203.

14 In England 20% of food bought goes to trash. The same thing happens in most developed countries, where people buy more than they consume, from the desire to have everything and more. Thus, each day, British people throw away 4.4 million apples, 1.6 million bananas, 1.3 million yoghurt containers, 660,000 eggs, 5,500 chickens, 440,000 packs of meals, 1.2 million sausages, 710,000 packs of chocolate or sweets, 260,000 boxes of cheese. Discarded food in the UK, in a year, reaches an amount of 3.3 million tons and 1.6 million tons of food is thrown by salespeople. British lose every year between 420 and 600 pounds, as they throw the food they purchase (to every pound consumed on food they lose 15 pence). The research was carried out and published by Martin Hickman (Consumer Affairs Correspondent), „What a waste: Britain throws away LlObn of food every year", in The Independent, May 8,2008, available at http://www.independent. co.uk Another study, done in 2004 showed that U.S. food was thrown in quantities also impressive. 14% of food bought by consumers are discarded, half of them still unopened! The total amount that you every American lose, buying food they throw is over 550 USD per year! See http://derscanu.7ani.net/cata-mancare-aruncam-la-gunoi/

15 By this remark, we shall not repeat what emerged from the famous fable: Cdinele $i cafelul by Grigore Alexandrescu, but we just try to present a rather complex study that most debates are based on.

16 Canon 21 of the Council of Gangra says: „We shall not defame the wealth earned on lightness with charity and simplicity and we praise the simplicity and temper in dressing, which only serves to simply cover the body, and we go back on the aspirations for softness and luxury". Arhid. Prof. PhD. John N. Floca (2005). Canoanele Bisericii Ortodoxe. Note §i comentarii. Third Edition, Sibiu, p 225.

actively involved in mitigating of some harsh social policies and in raising every man in society, regardless of social position of ethnic, gender or age. In this respect, Saint Paul said: "There is neither a Jew nor Greek, there is either slave or free, there is no male and female, for you are all one in Jesus Christ" (Gal. 3, 28). Therefore, it will be interesting to analyze the point of view of the Christian Church to the economic problems humanity has ever faced and is still facing. Personally, I believe that every economical crisis from this world has roots in the moral crisis. The economical problems can be solved only through Christian love, which must characterised by relationships between humans. Sharing and receiving is the way of life in this world, because we are only stewards and the owner is God.

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