Scholarly article on topic 'The management of stroke patients. Conference of experts with a public hearing. Mulhouse (France), 22 October 2008'

The management of stroke patients. Conference of experts with a public hearing. Mulhouse (France), 22 October 2008 Academic research paper on "Clinical medicine"

CC BY-NC-ND
0
0
Share paper
OECD Field of science
Keywords
{Stroke / Outcomes / Rehabilitation / "Accident vasculaire cérébral" / Orientation / Rééducation}

Abstract of research paper on Clinical medicine, author of scientific article — Jacques Pelissier

Abstract The objective is to define as early as possible appropriate criteria for managing patients who have had a cerebrovascular accident (CVA), or stroke, beginning in the Neurovascular and Acute Care Services, in order to facilitate the patient's return home (or the equivalent of home) or continuing care in the most appropriate health care facility. Three clinical assessment tools are used in the initial care phase because they are robust and reproducible: – the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score appears to be the best clinical assessment tool. It is the reference scale used during the acute phase of a stroke because it predicts the patient's chances of recovery and the medium-term functional recovery; – the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) is an initial assessment tool useful in predicting the medium-term evolution in terms of level of consciousness, essentially in cases of cerebral hemorrhage or severe cerebral infarction; – the Barthel Index (BI), scored from 0 – 100, is used during the first seven days after a stroke, and the index's progression over the following two weeks is a factor in predicting the functional recovery of stroke patients. The values of these tools must take the markers of clinical stability into account during the initial phase. These markers also have a predictive value: – the curve of the relationship between blood pressure (BP) and the prognosis of stroke patients would have a U-shape, with extreme BP values having a negative influence; – hyperthermia and hypoxia are also early predictive factors of poor functional and vital prognoses; – the presence and continuation of urinary incontinence and/or swallowing disorders are important predictive factors for a poor functional prognosis and a higher mortality rate in the medium term. Complementary examinations make it possible to approximate the anatomical, metabolic and physiological status of the injured cerebral parenchyma early on, when the processes of reparation and plasticity restoration have already begun. The reparation process is a complex multifactor phenomenon that can, at any moment, be called into question; it cannot be predicted with certainty by complementary examinations only, at least at the current level of knowledge. Two parameters seem decisive in using imaging to predict stroke recovery: MRI exploration of the cerebral parenchyma and the exploration of vascular permeability via perfusion imaging. Currently, the place of functional and molecular imaging appears to be limited. Among the possible neurophysiological explorations, only motor evoked potentials (MEP) represent a simple, non-invasive, low-cost procedure that can have additional prognostic value. Hyperglycemia also has a negative impact on the functional and vital prognoses. The usefulness of biomarkers has not yet been validated. Other clinical factors influence the prognosis. Though age is an aggravating factor in the vital prognosis of stroke patients, it cannot be considered an independent factor in the functional prognosis due to the multiple co-morbidities associated with age. Diabetes, ischemic cardiopathies and atrial fibrillation are co morbidities that worsen the functional and vital prognoses of stroke patients. Cognitive disorders without dementia also have a negative influence on the functional prognosis, particularly hemi spatial neglect and phasic disorders accompanied by comprehension problems. Post-stroke dementia plays a very detrimental role. However, even though they can delay the acquisition of increased autonomy, cognitive disorders are not an obstacle for rehabilitation, and depression apparently has no influence on the rehabilitation results. Family is an essential factor. Family support is a necessary condition for the patient's discharge from the hospital and affects the length of the hospital stay. Wide-ranging effective organized family support improves the patient's functional status. The factors that make it possible for the patient to return home are the existence of home support, a moderate level of impairment and being of the masculine gender. Social rank and socioeconomic status also play a role: when rank and status are low, they are not only stroke risk factors but also increase the risks of poststroke mortality and of institutionalization. For the health care system to perform well, stroke management plans must respect two requirements: – individual requirement: the best possible match between the patient's needs and possibilities and the follow-up services, without missing any patient opportunity for an optimal return to normalcy; – organizational requirement: early intervention and the optimal transfer time in order to insure system flexibility and make it possible for the greatest number of patients to benefit from care in a specialized facility, particularly during the acute phase of the stroke. Patients will preferably be directed towards: – an intermediary or Intensive Care facility and then a rehabilitation facility specialized in brain injuries. Patients with severe impairment (NIHSS over 16), when they are conscious and off artificial ventilation, with or without a tracheotomy; malignant stroke patients, postdecompressive hemicraniectomy; and stroke patients with basilar trunk occlusion, after thrombolysis recanalization; – a follow-up and rehabilitation care facility specialized in neurological disorders. Patients with medium-level hemiplegia (NIHSS between 5 and 15 and/or Barthel Index≥20) who begin to improve in the first 7 days and younger patients with more serious hemiplegia if there is no rehabilitation facility specialized in brain injuries nearby; – a non-specialized follow-up and rehabilitation care facility or one that is specialized in the disorders of polypathologic elderly patients who are dependent or at risk of being dependent. Patients with serious hemiplegia without any signs of recovery in the first 7 days, who have multiple indicators of a poor prognosis (Barthel Index<20, persistent incontinence, multiple complex deficiencies) and/or who do not need a coordinated multidisciplinary rehabilitation program or will not, in the immediate future, be able to take part in at least 3hours of exercise per day; – a facility for dependent elderly people. Elderly patients, especially those over 80 years of age, who are socially isolated and/or have had a severe stroke resulting in motor and cognitive deficits, swallowing disorders and incontinence; Except for the case of minor strokes that spontaneously evolve towards recovery, the decision for an early return home for patients with deficits is based on three criteria: need (i.e., a persistent incapacity that is nonetheless compatible with life at home and rehabilitation), feasibility (i.e., patient residence in the same geographic zone as the hospital) and safety (i.e., stability of the medical situation). This kind of return is more frequent in northern Europe than in France, and it is significantly correlated with a better medium-term recovery, in terms of preventing death and increasing autonomy and satisfaction. The positive impact of an early discharge is more significant in moderately dependent patients (initial Barthel Index>45). Two factors are essential for the success of such early returns home: – a home visit carried out before the patient's discharge; – a multidisciplinary team (physiotherapists, occupational therapist, speech therapist, doctor, nurse and social worker) who, at the end of the patient's hospital stay, takes responsibility for appropriate patient care immediately following the patient's discharge, for a period of approximately three months and a minimum frequency of four sessions per week. The Early Supported Discharge (ESD) model developed in Anglosaxon countries, which facilitates and conditions this kind of discharge plan, does not correspond exactly to the French health system's Hospitalisation à domicile (HAD), but the correspondence between the two is worth exploring. In the absence of a multidisciplinary intervention, the early long-term intervention (at least 5 months) of an occupational therapist in the patient's home can reduce the patient's level of impairment after an early return home (less than 1 month after the stroke). Maintaining the patient in his/her home starts by identifying the needs of both the patient and the caregivers, updating these needs as the situation evolves. The multidisciplinary team plays an important role in maintaining, even increasing, the patient's autonomy, and improving the patient's quality of life and that of his/her caregivers, while ensuring an optimal level of safety in the home. This is accomplished by educating both the patient and caregivers and by home interventions. The failure to maintain the patient at home can be caused by the worsening of the patient's condition (e.g., intercurrent disorders, loss of autonomy) or unpredictable factors (e.g., death of the patient's spouse), but also by the exhaustion of the patient's caregivers. When patient autonomy backslides or the patient loses interest, the intervention of a multidisciplinary team in the home of the stroke patient can help to reduce the deterioration rate of the activities of daily living (ADLs) and increase the patient's capacity to do personal activities. This intervention consists of repeat visits in the three months that follow the patient's discharge from the hospital. The health care providers and the caregivers need information about transfer techniques, adapting and using technical aids, fall prevention and the development of safety strategies for the home, improving communication difficulties, and adapting to the patient's visual disturbances and emotional changes. In the absence of a structured multidisciplinary team, occupational therapy can have a positive effect on personal and instrumental ADLs and social participation. Physiotherapy in the home alone doesn’t seem to have a significant effect on the patient's functional capacities.

Academic research paper on topic "The management of stroke patients. Conference of experts with a public hearing. Mulhouse (France), 22 October 2008"

Disponible en ligne sur

ScienceDirect

Elsevier Masson France

EM| consulte

www.em-consulte.com

www.sciencedirect.com

Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine 53 (2010) 124-147

Professional practices and recommendations / Pratiques professionnelles et recommandations

The management of stroke patients. Conference of experts with a public hearing. Mulhouse (France), 22 October 2008§

Orientation des patients atteints d'AVC. Conférence d'experts avec audition publique. Mulhouse le 22 octobre 2008^

Jacques Pelissier

Service de rééducation fonctionnelle, hôpital Caremeau, avenue du professeur-Debré, 30006 Nîmes cedex, France

Abstract

The objective is to define as early as possible appropriate criteria for managing patients who have had a cerebrovascular accident (CVA), or stroke, beginning in the Neurovascular and Acute Care Services, in order to facilitate the patient's return home (or the equivalent of home) or continuing care in the most appropriate health care facility.

Three clinical assessment tools are used in the initial care phase because they are robust and reproducible:

- the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score appears to be the best clinical assessment tool. It is the reference scale used during the acute phase of a stroke because it predicts the patient's chances of recovery and the medium-term functional recovery;

- the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) is an initial assessment tool useful in predicting the medium-term evolution in terms of level of consciousness, essentially in cases of cerebral hemorrhage or severe cerebral infarction;

- the Barthel Index (BI), scored from 0 - 100, is used during the first seven days after a stroke, and the index's progression over the following two weeks is a factor in predicting the functional recovery of stroke patients.

The values of these tools must take the markers of clinical stability into account during the initial phase. These markers also have a predictive value:

- the curve of the relationship between blood pressure (BP) and the prognosis of stroke patients would have a U-shape, with extreme BP values having a negative influence;

- hyperthermia and hypoxia are also early predictive factors of poor functional and vital prognoses;

- the presence and continuation of urinary incontinence and/or swallowing disorders are important predictive factors for a poor functional prognosis and a higher mortality rate in the medium term.

§ Organized by: the French society of physical and rehabilitation medicine (SOFMER), the French society of neurovascular disorders (SFNV), and the French society of gerontology and geriatrics (SFGG).

° Organisee par la Societe française de medecine physique et de readaptation (Sofmer), la Societe française de neurovasculaire (SFNV) et la Societe française de geriatrie et gerontologie (SFGG).

E-mail address: jacques.pelissier@CHU-nimes.fr.

1877-0657/$ - see front matter © 2009 Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. doi:10.1016/j.rehab.2009.11.003

Complementary examinations make it possible to approximate the anatomical, metabolic and physiological status of the injured cerebral parenchyma early on, when the processes of reparation and plasticity restoration have already begun. The reparation process is a complex multifactor phenomenon that can, at any moment, be called into question; it cannot be predicted with certainty by complementary examinations only, at least at the current level of knowledge.

Two parameters seem decisive in using imaging to predict stroke recovery: MRI exploration of the cerebral parenchyma and the exploration of vascular permeability via perfusion imaging. Currently, the place of functional and molecular imaging appears to be limited. Among the possible neurophysiological explorations, only motor evoked potentials (MEP) represent a simple, non-invasive, low-cost procedure that can have additional prognostic value. Hyperglycemia also has a negative impact on the functional and vital prognoses. The usefulness of biomarkers has not yet been validated.

Other clinical factors influence the prognosis. Though age is an aggravating factor in the vital prognosis of stroke patients, it cannot be considered an independent factor in the functional prognosis due to the multiple co-morbidities associated with age. Diabetes, ischemic cardiopathies and atrial fibrillation are co morbidities that worsen the functional and vital prognoses of stroke patients.

Cognitive disorders without dementia also have a negative influence on the functional prognosis, particularly hemi spatial neglect and phasic disorders accompanied by comprehension problems. Post-stroke dementia plays a very detrimental role. However, even though they can delay the acquisition of increased autonomy, cognitive disorders are not an obstacle for rehabilitation, and depression apparently has no influence on the rehabilitation results.

Family is an essential factor. Family support is a necessary condition for the patient's discharge from the hospital and affects the length of the hospital stay. Wide-ranging effective organized family support improves the patient's functional status. The factors that make it possible for the patient to return home are the existence of home support, a moderate level of impairment and being of the masculine gender. Social rank and socioeconomic status also play a role: when rank and status are low, they are not only stroke risk factors but also increase the risks of poststroke mortality and of institutionalization.

For the health care system to perform well, stroke management plans must respect two requirements:

- individual requirement: the best possible match between the patient's needs and possibilities and the follow-up services, without missing any patient opportunity for an optimal return to normalcy;

- organizational requirement: early intervention and the optimal transfer time in order to insure system flexibility and make it possible for the greatest number of patients to benefit from care in a specialized facility, particularly during the acute phase of the stroke.

Patients will preferably be directed towards:

- an intermediary or Intensive Care facility and then a rehabilitation facility specialized in brain injuries. Patients with severe impairment (NIHSS over 16), when they are conscious and off artificial ventilation, with or without a tracheotomy; malignant stroke patients, postdecom-pressive hemicraniectomy; and stroke patients with basilar trunk occlusion, after thrombolysis recanalization;

- a follow-up and rehabilitation care facility specialized in neurological disorders. Patients with medium-level hemiplegia (NIHSS between 5 and 15 and/or Barthel Index > 20) who begin to improve in the first 7 days and younger patients with more serious hemiplegia if there is no rehabilitation facility specialized in brain injuries nearby;

- a non-specialized follow-up and rehabilitation care facility or one that is specialized in the disorders of polypathologic elderly patients who are dependent or at risk of being dependent. Patients with serious hemiplegia without any signs of recovery in the first 7 days, who have multiple indicators of a poor prognosis (Barthel Index < 20, persistent incontinence, multiple complex deficiencies) and/or who do not need a coordinated multidisciplinary rehabilitation program or will not, in the immediate future, be able to take part in at least 3 hours of exercise per day;

- a facility for dependent elderly people. Elderly patients, especially those over 80 years of age, who are socially isolated and/or have had a severe stroke resulting in motor and cognitive deficits, swallowing disorders and incontinence;

Except for the case of minor strokes that spontaneously evolve towards recovery, the decision for an early return home for patients with deficits is based on three criteria: need (i.e., a persistent incapacity that is nonetheless compatible with life at home and rehabilitation), feasibility (i.e., patient residence in the same geographic zone as the hospital) and safety (i.e., stability of the medical situation). This kind of return is more frequent in northern Europe than in France, and it is significantly correlated with a better medium-term recovery, in terms of preventing death and increasing autonomy and satisfaction. The positive impact of an early discharge is more significant in moderately dependent patients (initial Barthel Index > 45).

Two factors are essential for the success of such early returns home:

- a home visit carried out before the patient's discharge;

- a multidisciplinary team (physiotherapists, occupational therapist, speech therapist, doctor, nurse and social worker) who, at the end of the patient's hospital stay, takes responsibility for appropriate patient care immediately following the patient's discharge, for a period of approximately three months and a minimum frequency of four sessions per week.

The Early Supported Discharge (ESD) model developed in Anglosaxon countries, which facilitates and conditions this kind of discharge plan, does not correspond exactly to the French health system's Hospitalisation a domicile (HAD), but the correspondence between the two is worth exploring. In the absence of a multidisciplinary intervention, the early long-term intervention (at least 5 months) of an occupational therapist in the patient's home can reduce the patient's level of impairment after an early return home (less than 1 month after the stroke).

Maintaining the patient in his/her home starts by identifying the needs of both the patient and the caregivers, updating these needs as the situation evolves. The multidisciplinary team plays an important role in maintaining, even increasing, the patient's autonomy, and improving the patient's quality of life and that of his/her caregivers, while ensuring an optimal level of safety in the home. This is accomplished by educating both the patient and caregivers and by home interventions. The failure to maintain the patient at home can be caused by the worsening of the patient's condition (e.g., intercurrent disorders, loss of autonomy) or unpredictable factors (e.g., death of the patient's spouse), but also by the exhaustion of the patient's caregivers.

When patient autonomy backslides or the patient loses interest, the intervention of a multidisciplinary team in the home of the stroke patient can help to reduce the deterioration rate of the activities of daily living (ADLs) and increase the patient's capacity to do personal activities. This intervention consists of repeat visits in the three months that follow the patient's discharge from the hospital. The health care providers and the caregivers need information about transfer techniques, adapting and using technical aids, fall prevention and the development of safety strategies for the home, improving communication difficulties, and adapting to the patient's visual disturbances and emotional changes. In the absence of a structured multidisciplinary team, occupational therapy can have a positive effect on personal and instrumental ADLs and social participation. Physiotherapy in the home alone doesn't seem to have a significant effect on the patient's functional capacities.

© 2009 Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. Keywords: Stroke; Outcomes; Rehabilitation Résumé

L'objectif est de definir le plus précocement possible des criteres pertinents d'orientation des patients atteints d'AVC a partir des unites neurovasculaires (UNV) ou structures de soin aigue, afin de faciliter le retour au domicile (ou equivalent de domicile) ou la poursuite de la prise en charge dans les structures de soin les plus adaptees.

Des la phase initiale, trois outils cliniques sont utiles car robustes et reproductibles :

- le score NIHSS apparaît comme le meilleur outil clinique dévaluation et est l'echelle de reference a utiliser durant la phase aigue des AVC car prédictif du pronostic vital et du devenir fonctionnel a moyen terme ;

- le score de Glasgow est un outil dévaluation initial utile comme facteur prédictif de revolution a moyen terme de la vigilance, essentiellement en cas d'hemorragie cerébrale ou d'infarctus cerébral severe ;

- l'index de Barthel (cote sur 100), réalise dans les sept premiers jours et sa progression au cours des deux premieres semaines représentent un facteur prédictif du devenir fonctionnel des patients AVC.

Les valeurs de ces indices doivent tenir compte de marqueurs de stabilité; clinique a la phase initiale qui ont egalement leur valeur pronostique :

- la relation entre la pression arterielle (PA) et le pronostic des patients AVC suivrait une courbe en U avec une influence pejorative des valeurs extreîmes de PA ;

- une hyperthermie ainsi qu'une hypoxie constituent des facteurs prédictifs précoces de mauvais pronostic fonctionnel et vital ;

- la présence (et la persistance) d'une incontinence urinaire et/ou de troubles de la deglutition représente un important facteur prédictif de mauvais pronostic fonctionnel et de surmortalite a moyen terme.

Les examens complementaires permettent d'approcher précocement l'état anatomique, metabolique et physiologique du parenchyme cerébral lese, alors que deja s'amorcent les processus de reparation et de plasticité:. Phenomtine multifactoriel d'une grande complexite, pouvant a chaque instant etre remis en cause, le processus de reparation ne peut etre prédit avec certitude en l'etat de nos connaissances par ces seules explorations. Deux parametres semblent determinants dans l'utilisation de l'imagerie a visee pronostique dans le cadre d'un AVC : l'exploration du parenchyme cerebral en IRM et l'exploration de la permeabilite vasculaire en imagerie de perfusion. Actuellement, la place de l'imagerie fonctionnelle et moleculaire semble limitee. Parmi les explorations neurophysiologiques, seuls les potentiels evoques moteurs (PEM) représentent une technique simple, non invasive et peu couteuse pouvant apporter une valeur pronostique additionnelle. L'hyperglycemie a un effet deletere sur le pronostic vital et fonctionnel. L'utilite des biomarqueurs n'est actuellement pas validee.

D'autres facteurs cliniques influencent le pronostic. L'age est un facteur aggravant le pronostic vital des AVC, mais qui ne peut pas etre consideré comme un facteur de pronostic fonctionnel independant du fait des polymorbidites associees a l'age. Le diabete, les cardiopathies ischemiques et la fibrillation auriculaire sont des comorbidites aggravant le pronostic vital et fonctionnel des AVC.

Les troubles cognitifs non dementiels ont une influence pejorative sur le pronostic fonctionnel et en particulier les troubles phasiques avec troubles de la compréhension, l'heminegligence. Les syndromes dementiels post-AVC ont un role très defavorable. Cependant, les troubles cognitifs, s'ils retardent l'acquisition des gains d'autonomie, ne sont pas un obstacle a la prise en charge en reeducation. La depression n'influence pas le résultat de la reeducation.

L'entourage familial est un facteur essentiel conditionnant le mode de sortie et la durée d'hospitalisation. Un support familial important, efficace et organise, ameliore ainsi le statut fonctionnel. Les facteurs favorisant le retour a domicile sont la présence d'un aidant naturel a domicile, un niveau de handicap modeste, le sexe masculin ; le niveau social et le statut socioeconomique jouent un role : faibles ils sont non seulement facteurs de risque d'AVC, de mortalite post-AVC, mais aussi d'institutionnalisation.

Pour le bon fonctionnement de la filière de soins, l'orientation doit respecter deux imperatifs :

- imperatif individuel : meilleure adequation possible entre les besoins et possibilities des patients et les prestations des services de suite, sans perte de chance pour les patients ;

- imperatif organisationnel : précocite de l'orientation et meilleur delai possible de transfert afin d'assurer la fluidite de la filiere et de faire beneficier le plus grand nombre de patients d'une prise en charge par une structure dediee, notamment a la phase aigue de l'AVC.

Seront orientes préferentiellement :

- vers une structure intermediaire de postréanimation puis une structure de reeducation et réadaptation specialisee pour cerébroleses : les deficit severes (NIHSS superieur a 16), lorsqu'ils sont conscients, sevrés de la ventilation artificielle sans ou avec tracheotomie ; les AVC cerébraux malins après hemicraniectomie decompressive ; les AVC par occlusion du tronc basilaire après recanalisation par thrombolyse ;

- vers le SSR specialise! en affections neurologiques : les hemiplegies de gravite intermediaire (NIHSS entre 5 et 15 et Barthel Index > 20) avec un debut d'amelioration dans les septpremiers jours , et les hemiplegies plus graves chez des sujets plus jeunes dans la mesure ou il n'y a pas a proximite de structure de reeducation et readaptation specialisee pour cerébroMses ;

- vers les SSR non specialises ou specialises en affections de la personne agee polypathologique dependante ou a risque de dependance : les hemiplegies graves sans signe de recuperation dans les sept premiers jours avec presence de signes de mauvais pronostic (Barthel

Index < 20, persistance d'une incontinence, multiplicite et complexite des deficiences) et qui n'ont pas besoin d'un programme de reeducation multidisciplinaire coordonne; ou ne sont pas en mesure de participer a au moins trois heures de reeducation par jour a brève echeance ;

- vers un etablissement pour personne agee dependante (EHPAD) : les patients d'age avance, surtout au-dela de 80 ans, avec isolement social, dont l'AVC est severe (deficit moteur et cognitif, troubles de la deglutition et incontinence).

Hors le cas des AVC mineurs evoluant spontanement vers la recuperation, le retour précoce au domicile du patient deficitaire est fonde: sur trois criteres : la persistance d'une incapacité! compatible avec la vie au domicile et la necessite d'une prise en charge en reeducation, la faisabilite (residence du patient dans la meme zone géographique que l'hopital) et la securite , c'est a dire la stabilite au plan medical.

Ce mode de retour, plus frequent dans l'Europe du Nord qu'en France, est significativement associe a une meilleure evolution a moyen terme, que ce soit en termes de decèïs, d'autonomie ou de satisfaction. L'impact positif d'une sortie précoce est plus important chez les patients moderément dependants (indice de Barthel initial > 45).

Deux elements conditionnent la réussite de ce retour au domicile

- une visite du domicile réalisee avant la sortie ;

- une equipe multidisciplinaire (kinesitherapeute, ergotherapeute, orthophoniste, medecin, infirmiere et assistante sociale) prenant en charge les patients a leur sortie et assurant des soins adaptes des le jour de la sortie, pendant environ trois mois et a une fréquence de quatre fois par semaine au minimum.

Le modele de l' early supported discharge (ESD) deeveloppe dans les pays anglo-saxons qui accompagne et conditionne ce retour ne correspond pas tout a fait a l'HAD tel que notre systeme de sante l'entend, mais merite d'etre developpe.

A defaut d'intervention multidisciplinaire, l'intervention précoce mais durable (cinq mois) au domicile d'un ergotherapeute réduit le handicap du patient avec retour précoce au domicile (moins d'un mois après l'AVC).

Le maintien au domicile passent d'abord par l'identification des besoins, des patients comme des aidants, et leur actualisation ; la encore l'equipe multidisciplinaire joue un role pour maintenir, voire accroître l'autonomie du patient, ameliorer sa qualite de vie et celle de son entourage, tout en assurant une securite optimale au domicile. Cela passe par l'education du patient et des aidants, comme par l'intervention au domicile.

Les causes de l'echec de ce maintien peuvent etre dues a une aggravation de l'etat du patient (affection intercurrente, perte d'autonomie), a des facteurs imprévisibles (perte du conjoint) mais aussi a l'epuisement de l'entourage.

L'intervention d'une equipe multidisciplinaire au domicile a distance de la l'AVC, lorsque s'installe regression de l'autonomie, desinrérêt, contribue a réduire le taux de deterioration dans les activites de la vie quotidienne et a augmenter les capacites du patient a faire des activités personnelles. Elle consiste en des visites répetees dans les trois mois suivants la sortie. Les soignants et au-dela les aidants ont besoin d'informations sur les techniques de transfert, l'adaptation et l'utilisation des aides techniques, la prevention des chutes et le developpement de strategies de securite a domicile, l'amelioration des difficultes de communication, l'adaptation aux perturbations visuelles et aux changement émotionnels du patient. A defaut dréquipe multidisciplinaire structurée, l'ergotherapie a un effet positif sur les AVQ personnelles, instrumentales et la participation sociale ; la kineisitherapie a domicile seule ne semble pas avoir d'effet significatif sur les capacites fonctionnelles du patient. © 2009 Publie par Elsevier Masson SAS.

Mots clés : Accident vasculaire cerebral ; Orientation ; Reeducation

1. English version

1.1. Glossary

Caregiver

CT-scan

Supported

Discharge

activities of daily living

Auditory Evoked Potential

Barthel Index (scores up to 100), measures the

incapacities connected to motor and visceral

impairments

the people who supply personal assistance (monitoring, safety and/or transfer aid). They may be family members, friends, or paid personnel. They don't provide medical care, either technical or basic.

computerized axial tomography multidisciplinary team, usually composed of doctors (PRM or not) knowledgeable about the stroke issues, nurses, occupational therapists, speech therapists, social workers and a secretary. This team intervenes at the hospital and continues to intervene in the patient's home.

EHPAD French acronym for a follow-up medical facility for dependent elderly people (+60 years of age) under tripartite multi-year contract between the facility, the Departmental Council and the Departmental Administration for Medical and Social Actions. These facilities are partially medicalized, with the presence of salaried nurses, but also, as needed, doctors, physiotherapists and speech therapists working in private practice HBP High Blood Pressure, or Hypertension

HTN Hypertension, or high blood pressure

MAP Mean Arterial Pressure MEP Motor Evoked Potentials

MRI Magnetic Resonance Imaging

NIHSS National Institute of Health Stroke Scale NVCU Neuro-Vascular Care Unit, a section of the

hospital providing neuro-vascular care. PET-scan Positron Emission Tomography PMSI French acronym for the Programme de Medicalisation du Systeme d'Information, a form of centralized electronic medical records

QoL Quality of Life

SAMAD French acronym for a program of assistance intended to help keeping the patient in his/her home SBP Systolic Blood Pressure

SEP Somatosensory Evoked Potentials

SSR French acronym for a follow-up care and

rehabilitation facility (medium-term stay) USLD French acronym for the long-term care facility (medical), which has the job of lodging patients who need Significant Medical-Technical Care (French acronym: SMTI) and who thus need to be cared for in a facility that has sufficient material and human means at its disposal to properly and safely care for "serious" pathologies that are still evolving and/or unstable.

order to facilitate the patient's return home (or the equivalent of home) or continuing care in the most appropriate health care facility.

1.2.3. Sponsors

The French Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (Sofmer), the French Society of Neurovascular Disorders (SFNV) and the French Society of Gerontology and Geriatrics (SFGG).

1.2.4. Chosen method

Conference of experts with a public hearing, according to the SOFMER method*

ELSEVIER MASSON

Disponible en ligne sur www,sdencedirecl,corn

ScienceDirect

Annales de réadaptation et de médecine physique 50 (2007) 106-110

Professional practices and recommendations

.NN ALES ■ RÉADAPTATION

el de MÉDECINE PHYSIQUE

ht1p://fran ce.eise vi er.com/direct/ANNRMP.;

Establishing recommendations for physical medicinc and rehabilitation:

the SOFMER methodology

F. Rannou3-*, E. Coudeyreb, P. Ribinik1-", Y. Mace3, S. Poiraudeau3, M. Revel3

* Service de reeducation, APHP. universale Rene-Descartes, groupe hospilalier Cochin. 27. ruedu Fauhourg-Saint-Jacques. 75014 Paris, France 1 Centre de MPR Notre Dame. BP 86. 4. avenue Joseph-CIaussat. 63404 Chamalieres. France 0Serviced? MPR. centte hospitalierde Gonesse, 25. me Pierne-de-Theilley. BP 71. 95503 Oonesse. France

Received 3 January 2007; accepted 10 January 2007

Traduction des mots dans l'image: Available on-line at www.sciencedirect.com

1.2. Recommendations

1.2.1. Committees

Steering committee: Michel Barat (President), Maurice Giroud, Jacques Pelissier (Secretary).

Scientific committee: Gilles Kemoun (Secretary - bibliographic research), Philippe Marque, Jean-Louis Mas, JeanPhilippe Neau (President), Denis Sablot (Secretary).

Peer reviewing committee: Geriatricians: Marc Verny, Joel Belmin, Fabienne Yvain; General Practioner: Bernard Gay. Neurologists: Helene Mahagne, France Woimant, Mathieu Zuber; PRM specialists: Paul Calmels, Andre Thevenon, Jean Sengler.

1.2.2. Objective

Define as early as possible the appropriate criteria for managing stroke (Cerebral Vascular Accident [CVA]) patients, starting in the Neurovascular and/or Acute Care Services, in

The questions and the experts. 1. What are the prognosis criteria during the initial phase (the first 10 days)?

1a. What are the criteria for clinical stabilization? Which clinical assessment tools are used in the initial phase? (20 min)

P. Dehail (PRM specialist, Geriatrician, Bordeaux), C. Arquizan (Neurologist, Montpellier)

1b. What is the impact of imaging?

1. Sibon (Neurologist, Bordeaux), P. Menegon (Neuror-adiologist, Bordeaux)

1c. What is the impact of neurophysiology?

G. Nicolas (Neurologist, Angers)

1d. What is the impact of neurobiology?

G. Godeneche (Neurologist, Poitiers)

2. What is the impact of the patient's physiological status and his/her environment?

2a. What is the impact of age and polypathology?

F. Mounier-Vehier (Neurologist, Lens), J. Boddaert (Geriatrician, Pitie-Salpetriere),

2b. What is the impact of emotional and cognitive status?

H. Henon (Neurologist, Lille), J.M. Wirotius (PRM specialist, Brive)

2c. What is the impact of family and living conditions (material & architectural) on the management of stroke patients?

M. Rousseaux (PRM specialist, Lille), V. Wolff (Neurologist, Strasbourg)

3. What are the criteria for patient management following the initial phase (the first 10 days)?

3a Which patients should be targeted for a return to their homes, based on what criteria (excluding transitory ischemic stroke [TIS] patients and including minor strokes)?

C. Benaim (PRM specialist, Nice), T. Moulin (Neurologist, Besancon), D. Perennou (PRM specialist, Dijon)

3b How should severe stroke (CVA) patients (e.g., those with hematoma or massive infarction with or without craniotomy, brain stem stroke and Locked-In Syndrome [LIS], or complicated vascular malformations) be managed?

J. Froger (PRM specialist, Nîmes), R. Robert (Intensive Care specialist, Poitiers), S. Crozier (Neurologist, Pitie Salpetriere), B. Bataille (Neurosurgeon, Poitiers).

3c Which patients should be directed towards a follow-up care facility specialized in neurological rehabilitation, based on which criteria? Which patients should be directed towards a

follow-up care facility non-specialized in rehabilitation, based on which criteria?

J.C. Daviet (PRM specialist, Limoges), P. Decavel (Neurologist, Besançon)

4. What is the impact of intrahospital organization and the district's medical and social organization?

4a. Which patients should be provisionally directed towards the Home Medical Care program?

5. Timsit (Neurologist, Brest), A. Schnitzler (PRM specialist, Garches)

4b. Which patients should be directed towards a program providing assistance so that they can remain in their own homes?

F. Pellas (PRM specialist, Nîmes), J.F. Pinel (Neurologist, Rennes)

4c. Which patients should be directed towards a facility for dependent elderly people?

T. Vogel (Geriatrician, Strasbourg), M. Bruandet (Neurologist, Saint-Joseph)

4d. What are the conditions for maintaining a patient who has poststroke deficits in his/her home?

O. Simon (PRM specialist, Bichat), G. Rodier (Neurologist, Mulhouse)

1.3. Calendar

Chronology

Committee

Action

2 July 2007 Telephone meeting

17 September 2007 Telephone meeting

17 September 2007 Telephone meeting

8 October 2007

Physical & Telephone meeting (public transportation strike at the SNCF & RATP) Hôpital Saint-Anne, Paris

9 September 2008 Physical meeting Hôpital Cochin, Paris

9 September 2008 Physical meeting Hôpital Cochin, Paris

Steering committee

4 to 10 members (sponsoring societies, diverse practice modes & locations)

Scientific Committee

6 to 10 members (represented societies, diverse practice modes & locations)

Documentalists

School of Medicine, Poitiers

Scientific Committee & Expert Commission

(2 experts per question or sub-question)

(sponsoring societies, diverse practice modes & locations)

Scientific Committee & Expert Commission

Scientific Committee

Choose the questions

Organize the materials

Designate the Scientific Committee and the

Peer Reviewing Committee

Analyze the literature (bases, keywords) and develop the recommendations Designate the Peer Reviewing Committee

Complete bibliographic research Select abstracts

Submit the abstracts to the Scientific Committee, which will select the articles Distribute the articles to the experts

Analyze the articles, the ranking of the

evidence and the category of the

recommendations

Each expert, independently, must

write a report

Review and harmonize the work done Come to a consensus about the recommendations

Develop a questionnaire to evaluate the practices

(Continued )

Chronology

Committee

Action

22 October 2008 Conference of Experts with a Public Hearing

30 November 2008 Email exchanges

15 December 2008

Steering Committee, Scientific Committee Present the conclusions (presented by the experts)

& Expert Commission

Public Hearing before the members of the sponsoring societies

Peer Reviewing Committee

10 to 12 members; multidisciplinary

Scientific Journals & Websites of the Partner Societies

Collect the various practices and discuss them Draw the final conclusions

Critique the articles read Write the definitive version of the recommendations based on the literature and French conventions for daily practice, approved by the Peer Reviewing Committee

Publish the Recommendations

1.4. Introduction

Cerebral Vascular Accidents (CVA), or strokes, are the primary cause of handicap in Europe. Applied to French demographics, the European data show 140,000 strokes/year (176,000 including recurrent stroke), and the data in the Dijon stroke register show 91800 strokes/year. In 2005, the French program for centralized electronic medical records (PMSI) recorded 130,000 hospital stays linked to stroke in public and private institutions, with half of the patients being over 70 years of age; one out of four patients died, and 1 out of 4 had lasting sequela.

The administrative memo DHOS/DGS/DGAS No. 517 of 3 November 2003 described the organization of care starting in the initial phase; it also defined the concept of Neuro-Vascular Care Unit (NVCU) and created the regional care facilities that have since been established. The administrative memo DHOS/ DGS/DGAS No. 108 of 22 March 2007 completed the 2003 memo. Both highlight the importance of flexibility in order to guarantee the best care of patients with impairment, downstream, and the receiving capacity, upstream. The report by Jean Bardet, a member of the Parliament, on early stroke intervention recommends the same kind of flexibility.

The initial phase corresponds to initial care (i.e., emergency room, Neurovascular Care Unit, Neuro-Intensive Care, general medical care) until the patient is clinically stable. This phase corresponds approximately to the first ten days after the stroke. Once this phase is past, the patient should be targeted for either a return home or a transfer to the most appropriate care facility. This discharge plan must satisfy criteria that guarantee:

• the access of the patient to the facility that is the most likely to be able to improve his/her functional status, taking into account the place where the patient lives, his/her needs in terms of care, the available technology and the capacity of care offered by the most appropriate facility;

• the flexibility of the care, thus avoiding the risk that the patient will miss any opportunity for recovery.

Beyond stabilization of the vital signs, the ultimate objective is a functional objective (i.e., acquiring an independent

functional level and a satisfactory level of Quality of Life (QoL) as measured by the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF)). Only an appropriate, effective follow-up care and rehabilitation facility can fulfill this objective. The 2008 SFNV-SOFMER national survey, with 165 neurology services responding, reported a return home in 37% of the cases, with 24% of the cases being transferred to a Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (PRM) facility and 14% to a non-specialized downstream facility. These figures are close to those from a previous survey in 1999.

The administrative memo DHOS/DGS/DGAS No. 517 of 3 November 2003 underlines the importance of the "coordination between acute care and follow-up care and rehabilitation'' and "the organization of the downstream facilities in order to avoid the saturation of the NVCU''. However, the patient management criteria are not really described in detail. It is true that the 2001 publication of ''Criteres de prise en charge en MPR'' (PRM care criteria) (2001 edition, chapter 13, 2nd section) gave a partial response, but the criteria remain vague.

Consequently, it appears essential for PRM doctors, neurologists, geriatricians and general practitioners, who are all confronted with the need to care for stroke patients, to determine useful robust management criteria that take into account the most recent data about the factors involved in the vital and functional prognosis and the most recent resources in terms of the rehabilitation techniques for cognitive, motor, sensory and visceral impairments of stroke patients, as well as programs for their reintegration. This is the primary objective of these recommendations.

The administrative memo DHOS/DGS/DGAS No. 517 of 3 November 2003 also distinguishes between PRM and medicalized follow-up care without PRM. The distinction is no longer appropriate; the publication of the Decree No. 2008377 of 17 April 2008 - which defined the organization of the patient follow-up in terms of the clinical path, as indicated by the disorder in question instead of the previous definition in terms of the typology of the facilities - made the proximity of the facility apriority. The administrative memo No. DHOS/O1/ 2008/305 of 3 October 2008, pertaining to the Decree No. 2008-377 of 17 April 2008 regulating follow-up care and rehabilitation, defined a general framework in which the care of

neurological disorders (e.g., stroke) will figure. The objectives are quite general. It will thus be important, depending on the patient's status and the care objectives, to have more precise details concerning what can be expected of the follow-up care facility towards which the patient is directed. This is the secondary objective of these recommendations.

In order to make this text easier to read, we chose not to systematically include the ranking of the evidence and the category of the research recommendations. The ranking, categories and bibliographic references will appear in the arguments of the experts in response to the various questions that will be published in 2009 by the three partner scholarly societies.

1.5. Initial phase prognosis criteria

1.5.1. Clinical assessment tools

Three clinical assessment tools are indispensable during this phase due to their robustness and their reproducibility.

1.5.1.1. National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). Developed for acute phase tests, the NIHSS is a scale with 11 items and scores ranging from 0 to 42. This scale allows a quantitative analysis of neurological insufficiency (or deficits of a neurological origin). It has a very good reproducibility, inter-and intra-observer. It can be executed rapidly in less than 10 minutes, providing the reference score for the acute stroke phase (Rank 2, Category B). Its limitations include the assessment of cerebral infarctions, which are less well evaluated due to language disorders in left hemisphere lesions and due to hemispatial neglect in right hemisphere lesions, and the score's cut-off value for predicting the patient's progress, which can be different in cases affecting the anterior or posterior circulation. The initial NIHSS score helps to predict the initial progress and the 3-month clinical evolution.

There are three categories of NIHSS scores:

• NIHSS < 7: good prognosis (lack of aggravating factors and a good recovery at 3 months);

• NIHSS 7-16: intermediate score;

• NIHSS > 16: poor prognosis (especially if > 22).

1.5.1.2. Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). The GCS score has a mid-term predictive value for mortality and recovery after a recent stroke. It has a high prognostic value particularly for hemorrhages and serious infarctions (Rank 2, Category B).

1.5.1.3. Barthel Index (BI). The BI allows the patient's functional recovery to be estimated in terms of rehabilitation. The initial BI score at the acute stroke phase helps to predict the length of the hospital stay, the level of functional recovery and the destination at discharge (Rank 2, Category B). The BI score's progression from day 2 to day 15 is one of the principal predictive factors of the functional recovery 1 year after the stroke. Nonetheless, questions still persist about the threshold value that will provide a good functional prognosis and about when this index should be used. For example, this index is not

suitable for use during the early phase immediately after the stroke, in which the patient is confined to bed, because of the possibility of underestimating the patient's functional aptitudes.

The values of these tools must take into account the markers of clinical stability. These markers also have a predictive value:

• Blood pressure (BP)The influence of BP values is a subject of controversy. The systolic blood pressure (SBP) or the mean arterial pressure (MAP) at admittance has a negative influence on the vital and functional prognosis in the short-term (1st month), mid-term (3 months) and long-term (> 1 year). Hypertension, or high blood pressure (HBP) -developed in the 24 hours following the stroke and not chronic HBP - is associated with a worsening of the 3-month prognosis, as well as with a diminished level of consciousness. Increases in the MAP in the first days following a stroke have a more negative impact than the initial MAP value (1-and 3-month prognosis). Increases in pulse pressure (PP) (differential) in the first hours following a stroke is associated with a worsening of the 3-month functional prognosis, an increased risk of mortality and recidivism 1 year after the stroke.In other studies, the increase of the SBP in the 24 hours following a stroke has been associated with improved short-and mid-term prognoses. However, a decrease in SBP (> 20 mmHg) caused by the treatment, unlike a spontaneous decrease in the SBP, is associated with a deterioration of the neurological status and the prognosis.The curve of the relationship between the BP and the prognosis of stroke patients would have a U-shape, with a negative influence for the extreme BP values (cerebral complications when the BP is too high, cardiac complications when the BP is too low) (Rank 1, Category A). The optimal systolic blood pressure ranges between 150 and 180 mm Hg, while the optimal diastolic blood pressure ranges between 90 and 130 mm HG.

• Hyper/hypothermia and hypoxiaEven moderate hyperther-mia has been associated with greater stroke severity, a significant deterioration of the vital and functional prognosis at 48 hours and at 1 and 5 years, and a delay in the discharge from the NVCU and the follow-up care facility (Rank 2, Category B). It appears that there is no one agreed-on definition of hyperthermia. Only temperature increases observed after the 8th hour following the stroke have been associated with an influence on the 3-month prognosis, depending on the severity of the stroke.There is no real agreement about the influence of initial hypothermia on the functional recovery and the post-stroke mortality.Initial hypoxia (SaO2 < 90 or 92%) has been associated with a worsening of the NIHSS score and an increase in mortality at 3 months (Rank 2, Category B).

• Swallowing disordersThe existence or persistence of swallowing disorders during the initial post-stroke phase has been associated in the mid- and long-term with a worse functional prognosis, an increased risk of institutionalization and an increased mortality rate (Rank 2, Category B).

• Urinary incontinenceThe existence or persistence of urinary incontinence during the initial phase is a factor that is

independent of poor functional prognosis and mortality at 3 months. It is associated with the level of impairment, a reduced Quality of Life (QoL) and a risk of institutionalization (Rank 2, Category B). It is also associated with an increase in urinary tract infections and malnutrition.

1.5.2. Complementary examinations

Complementary examinations make it possible to approximate the anatomical, metabolic and physiological status of the injured cerebral parenchyma early on, when the processes of reparation and plasticity restoration have already begun. The reparation process is a complex multifactor phenomenon that can, at any moment, be called into question; it cannot be predicted with certainty by complementary examinations only, at least at the current level of knowledge.

1.5.2.1. Imaging. It is important to be able to visualize the cerebral parenchyma, its vascularization and its perfusion. Imaging helps to better ascertain not only the vital prognosis, but also the functional prognosis, as well as the specific prognoses for various disorders (e.g., epilepsy, Parkinson's Disease and vascular dementia [VAD]).

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and CT-scans evaluate the type, volume, location and number of lesions and preexisting anomalies. They make it possible to visualize leucoencephalopathic lesions and micro-bleeds.

The volume of the area affected appears to be correlated with the vital prognosis in cases of cerebral infarction and haematoma, especially in young patients. The correlation with the functional prognosis has been discussed in cases of cerebral infarction (Category C). However, a haematoma volume over 30 ml would have a poor functional prognosis, even though it would depend on the location of the haematoma, since the impact is not the same for different locations (Rank 2, Category B). There is no clearly established link between cerebral infarction and the specific prognoses mentioned above, but there is a link between the intracerebral haematoma and the risk of vascular epilepsy.

In terms of the location of the lesion, the functional prognosis would be worse in cases of middle cerebral artery infarction and cerebral territorial infarction than in cases of junctional infarction or deep subcortical infarction. The location of a haematoma in the posterior fossa has an impact on the vital prognosis (Rank 3, Category C, Expert consensus), but its influence on the functional prognosis is a subject of discussion. There seems to be no systematic correlation between vascular Parkinson's disease or vascular dementia and the location of the lesion. With respect to epilepsy, it seems that only a link between partial epilepsy and cortical lesions can be made.

Nonetheless, the number of lesions seems to be correlated to the functional prognosis, with a risk of vascular epilepsy, and researchers have wondered about the correlation to the risk of worsening cognitive function (Rank 2, Category B). The signs of rupture of the hemato-encephalic barrier have been linked to a poor functional prognosis and to death 30 days after an intra-cerebral hematoma (Rank 2, Category B). There is no data

concerning the specific prognosis for epilepsy, Parkinson's disease and vascular dementia. Last, hemorrhagic changes indicate a poor vital prognosis if they are over 25 ml (Rank 2, Category B), but the correlation to the functional prognosis is still a subject of discussion.

Pre-existing anomalies also play a role. The signs of leuco-encephalopathy indicate a worse vital and functional prognosis and an increased risk of stroke recidivism, vascular dementia and vascular Parkinson's disease (Rank 2, Category B). Micro-bleeds have been correlated to the degree of leuco-encephalo-pathy and are associated with an increased recidivism risk for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke.

CT angiography and MR angiography allow vascular permeability and occlusion locations to be visualized. Diffusion and perfusion imaging during the acute phase allow the extent of the infarction to be predicted and thus are a factor in the vital prognosis (Rank 2, Category B). The location of the occlusion and the possibilities for reperfusion have an effect on the vital and functional prognosis between 1 and 3 months. Reperfusion is a good prognosis factor if it occurs sufficiently early, particularly in the vertebro-basilar territory.

Functional MRIs and PET-Scans, which provide indications concerning functional and neurochemical changes, have been studied very little for the acute phase and thus have little practical impact at the present time.

1.5.2.2. Neuro-physiology. Motor Evoked Potentials (MEP) seem to be able to provide additional prognostic value compared to imaging or clinical evaluations. There is a correlation between the MEP of the upper limbs in the early phases of the stroke and the long-term prognosis of ischemic stroke patients. Recording MEP may be of interest in cases in which the initial impact is severe or, on the contrary, in the less serious cases (Rank 2, Category B). MEP provide more information about strength recovery than about functional recovery (Rank 2, Category B). Certain questions remain to be answered, such as which muscles should be used, the ideal time to conduct the examination, and the advantages of MEP for the lower limbs.

Although there has been little research compared to MEP, Somatosensory Evoked Potentials (SEP) do not appear to provide any convincing data; however, Auditory Evoked Potentials (AEP) of the brain stem could be of interest in the most serious stroke cases.

1.5.2.3. Biological parameters. Numerous studies have shown that hyperglycemia during the initial phase is associated with a worse prognosis, an increased risk of early neurological deterioration (in the first 48 hours) and a bigger infarction.

The biomarkers reflect cerebral gliosis (NSE, S-100 Protein), excitotoxicity (Glutamate, GABA), inflammation (Cytokines: Il-6, TNF-alpha; C-reactive protein; Cell adhesion molecules: VCAM1, ICAM1), oxydative stress (Ferritin, Bilirubinemia, NO), endothelial lesions (Fibronectin, MMP9, Endothelin 1, Albuminuria) and coagulation status (Fibrinogen, PAI1, D-Dimer). Although numerous biomarkers have been studied, particularly in cases of ischemic stroke, very few have

been studied during the acute phase of cerebral hemorrhages, and no bio-marker has currently been validated for use as a prognostic tool.

1.6. Clinical factors that influence the prognosis

1.6.1. Age and polypathology

1.6.1.1. Age. Age, as a linear criterion, is associated with the most negative vital prognosis (Rank 1, Category A). In terms of the functional prognosis, most studies agree on the negative influence of age, but several studies have contested the negative influence of age and/or its independent nature (Category C). Threshold values have been the subject of several publications. It would seem that the over-85 population has a worse vital and functional prognosis (Expert consensus).

1.6.1.2. Polypathology. For strokes of equal severity, a loss of autonomy prior to the stroke, as well as a diminished general prestroke state of health, can be correlated to increased mortality and dependence (Rank 2, Category B).

1.6.1.3. Diabetes. Diabetes has a negative impact on the vital and functional prognoses (Rank 2, Category B).

1.6.1.4. Ischemic cardiopathy and atrial fibrillation. There is a significant correlation between ischemic cardiopathy and atrial fibrillation and the increased risk of death, a greater level of impairment and institutionalization (Rank 2, Category B).

It is possible to use the Charlson co-morbidity index (lack of expert/professional consensus), but the non-homogeneous results in the literature do not allow conclusions to be drawn.

1.6.2. Emotional and cognitive status

1.6.2.1. Cognitive disorders and functional prognosis. Cognitive disorders without dementia have a negative influence on the functional prognosis in the short- and medium-term. They increase the risk of losing autonomy and the risk of institutionalization (Rank 2, Category B). The influence varies with the affected cognitive domain (attention disorders or global deficiencies) (Rank 2, Category B). No severity threshold is known for the functional prognosis; functional recovery appears slower and of lesser quality, but it remains present.

Hemispatial neglect has a negative influence on the functional prognosis, introducing a delay in postural acquisitions (Rank 1, Category A). The data concerning the influence of persistent anosognosia, in association with hemispatial neglect, are not homogeneous, but lean in the direction of a negative influence. Rehabilitation seems to be less effective in cases of hemispatial neglect. The question of the interest of rehabilitation, versus no rehabilitation, for patients greatly affected by hemispatial neglect has been asked, but has not yet been answered.

The results concerning the influence of aphasia on the functional prognosis are not homogeneous. It could depend

on the type of aphasia. Global aphasia seems to be a factor in a poor response to rehabilitation, with comprehension disorders having a deleterious effect (Category C). Still, the patients who have comprehension disorders also make progress in functional recovery (Category C, Expert consensus).

The current data do not allow conclusions to be drawn about the influence of apraxia on the functional prognosis.

Post-stroke dementia has a detrimental effect on the functional prognosis (Rank 2, Category B). Patients with this condition are more dependent for activities of daily living (ADLs), and the risk of secondary institutionalization is increased.

1.6.3. Depression and functional prognosis

There is a link between poststroke depression and the functional prognosis. However, no one knows if mood disorders are the cause or the consequence of functional disorders. The influence of mood disorders on the patient's recovery capacities and the benefit of rehabilitation appears to be slight. Most studies have not shown any influence of depression on the gains obtained through rehabilitation or on the effectiveness of rehabilitation. Other studies have suggested a slower recovery that is quantitatively as significant as for those without depression. The potential advantages of antidepressant treatments to improve the poststroke functional prognosis remain to be proved.

1.7. Family and social factors that influence the prognosis

Family is an essential factor. Family support is a necessary condition for the patient's discharge from the hospital and affects the length of the hospital stay.

The factors that make it possible for the patient to return home are couplehood, a young age, a moderate level of impairment and social rank (Rank 1, Category A). A short stay in the hospital is conditioned by family support and being of the masculine gender (Rank 1, Category A). A low socioeconomic status is not only a factor of stroke risk but also of post-stroke mortality (Rank 1, Category A). Patients with a low socioeconomic status are more often institutionalized and require more assistance with personal ADLs. There is also an increased risk of dependency and death. The wide-ranging effective organized support of the family thus improves the patient's functional status.

The patient's residual impairment is not without consequences on friends and family members (Rank 3, Category C, Expert consensus). More serious anxiodepressive disorders in caregivers are found after 3 months than after a year; they evolve in parallel to the patient's state. The following factors play a role in the consequences for the caregiver: the patient's cognitive and behavioral disorders, physical deficits and level of dependency; the caregiver's relationship with the patient; and, to a lesser degree, the caregiver's own physical and mental health. In terms of Quality of Life of caregivers, an increasing perception of his/her limitations and an increasing psychological morbidity can be observed, which in turn has a

detrimental effect on his/her health and social life. These Quality of Life issues appear to stabilize 3 months and 1 year after the stroke.

1.8. Care management criteria and choices

The Anglo-saxon Stroke Unit most often links acute care with interdisciplinary rehabilitation, thus improving the vital and functional prognosis of stroke patients, including those with severe strokes. However, the organization of the French health care system, in which acute care facilities and follow-up care are separate, makes necessary to formalize the patient care management plan as early as possible in order to guarantee a certain system flexibility and offer the patient that best quality of care. Given the technical level of certain kinds of care, the closest facilities are not always the best for dispensing the most appropriate care.

If the maximum gain in autonomy and the return to living conditions that most closely resemble those of the patient's before the stroke is the ultimate objective, several possibilities are offered by our health system:

• the return to the patient's home;

• the institutionalization in a facility for dependent elderly people;

• the transfer to a follow-up care facility specialized in neurological rehabilitation, with a technical platform for rehabilitation appropriate for neurological deficiencies. This type of facility offers rehabilitation specialized in brain injuries, with a particular specialty in complex care, specific means and a connection to Neurovascular Care Unit (Section 1.8.1);

• the transfer to a follow-up care facility that is not specialized in rehabilitation or one that is specialized in disorders of dependent polypathological elderly patients or at risk of dependency;

• transfer to and care in the hospitalisation a domicile (HAD) program or the equivalent.

Depending on the patient's repeated clinical evaluation in the first days after the stroke, on complementary explorations, on the availability of family and friends and on the home environment, the facility must be chosen based on the patient's needs and the available local resources. For the health care system to perform well, stroke management plans must respect two requirements:

• Individual requirement: the best possible match between the patient's needs and possibilities and the follow-up services, without missing any patient opportunity for an optimal return to normalcy;

• Organizational requirement: early intervention and the optimal transfer time in order to insure system flexibility and make it possible for the greatest number of patients to benefit from care in a specialized facility, particularly during the acute phase of the stroke.

1.8.1. Severe strokes (haematoma or massive infarction with or without craniotomy, brain stem stroke and LIS, complex vascular malformation)

The severity of the motor, cognitive and visceral impairments, and their vulnerability, give severe stroke patients a particular profile. Although there is no single definition for a severe stroke, strokes can be considered "severe" if the patient has a NIHSS score over 16 (Rank 2, Category B).

Severe stroke care in rehabilitation facilities specialized in brain injuries is valuable, notably for reducing mortality and encouraging the patient's return home (Rank 1, Category A). Such facilities, coordinated by a PRM doctor, make available to these patients:

• a nursing team trained in preventing the complications of immobility, performing tracheotomy care, managing enteral feeding via nasogastric tube and gastrojejunostomy, detecting neurological complications (e.g., comitial crisis) or other complications to be feared with this type of patient;

• a multidisciplinary rehabilitation team educated and trained to care for brain injuries in terms of their motor, sensitivity (i.e., pain), sensory, cognitive and visceral components.

Given the risk of decompensation or aggravation of the symptoms, access to Intensive Care, imaging and neurophysiol-ogy services is indispensable (Expert consensus). When services are not part of the Neurovascular Care Unit (NVCU), this kind of organization can be envisioned if the NVCU operates in close association with a referenced rehabilitation facilities specialized in brain injuries, which can be structured as intermediary or postIntensive Care facility (Expert consensus).

When the patient is admitted to Intensive Care, the management of his/her care beyond the 10th day after the stroke depends on the patient's clinical situation. The discharge from Intensive Care can only be considered once the physiological status has stabilized and the patient no longer needs any specialized monitoring.

Schematically, three clinical situations can be envisioned, each one with specific aspects:

• the patient is conscious and off artificial ventilation with or without a tracheotomy (reduced needs for oxygen input, but the necessity of tracheal aspirations 4 to 6 times a day at most). The transfer to an intermediary or post-Intensive Care facility would appear to be the most appropriate solution. In this facility, there must be constant access to an Intensive Care specialist who can intervene rapidly and, if necessary, transfer the patient to an Intensive Care service (Rank 4, Category C; Professional consensus);

• the patient is in a vegetative state or a minimally conscious state, and off artificial ventilation. Care for such patients and their prognosis goes beyond the framework of stroke patients, and should be approached globally in the context of the prognosis and management of patients in a persistent vegetative state or in minimally conscious state;

• the patient is in a persistent coma and is still on artificial ventilation. In these situations, the decision to limit and stop

therapeutic care must be discussed, according to the recommendations of the Société de Réanimation de Langue Française (The French Intensive Care Society) and the legislative framework (Law No. 2005-370 of 22 April 2005, called the Leonetti Law, pertaining to patient rights and end-of-life decisions). The decision must be made collectively, with the necessary information clearly conveyed to the patient's family.

Two situations with severe impairment that justify care in a rehabilitation facility specialized in brain injuries must be considered:

• patients under 60 years of age, who have had a massive stroke of the middle cerebral artery, whose decompressive hemi-craniotomy was done early on and who has improved vital and functional prognoses. Patient age under 60 and early intervention are the factors in favor of a better functional prognosis. It is important to take these factors into account in the second patient care management plan (Rank 4, Category C; Professional consensus);

• stroke patients with basilar trunk occlusion have a particularly inauspicious prognosis, with a survival rate of less than 30% and most often at the price of a very high level of impairment, such as the "Locked-In Syndrome'' (LIS). Intra-arterial or intravenous thrombolysis is recommended for some patients after basilar trunk occlusion (Rank 2, Category B). Early reperfusion of the basilar trunk will improve the vital and functional prognoses of such patients (Rank 2, Category B). It is important to take these recommendations into account in the second patient care management plan (Rank 4, Category C; Professional consensus). These patients would benefit from the care given in a specialized neurological rehabilitation facility.

1.8.2. The patients who should be oriented towards a follow-up rehabilitation care facility specialized in neurological disorders

After a stroke, patients will have a better functional recovery if they are treated in a unit with a technical rehabilitation platform specialized in neurological disorders. At least two sessions should be possible per day, with assistance apparatus in accordance with the requirements of physiotherapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy and neuropsychology. All the sub-groups of stroke patients benefit to a more or less important degree from a multidisciplinary coordinated approach (Rank 1, Category A), although patients with hemiplegia of intermediate severity benefit most from such care.

The value of the initial NIHSS score has been highlighted. However, for cases of severe strokes or strokes of intermediate severity, this score is less precise for predicting the potential level of recovery. Still, if follow-up care facilities specialized in neurological rehabilitation are sufficiently close to the patient's home, they have the best potential for helping the patient to acquire autonomy and for resolving patient impairments.

In the principal recommendations, the factors influencing the orientation are composite criteria: some are robust and

reproducible (e.g., clinical stabilization, hemispatial neglect, pain, swallowing disorders, learning ability and endurance); others are less reproducible (e.g., cognitive function and emotional state, communication disorders, stroke patient mobility and autonomy, continence, impairment in several sectors, need for 24/24 medical monitoring and family environment).

Globally, given French health care organization and the available tools, it is possible to propose care in a follow-up facility specialized in neurological rehabilitation (Expert consensus) for:

• patients with hemiplegia of intermediate seriousness (NIHSS between 5 and 15 and/or Barthel Index > 20) who begin to improve in the first 7 day;

• younger patients with more serious hemiplegia if there are no rehabilitation facilities specialized in brain injuries nearby;

• patients who are able to participate at least 3 hours per day in an exercise program, if not at the beginning, shortly after their arrival in a coordinated multidisciplinary rehabilitation program.

1.8.3. The patients who should be oriented towards a follow-up care facility that is not specialized in rehabilitation or one that is specialized in disorders of polypathological elderly patients, who are dependent or at risk of dependency

If cognitive disorders, fragility, denutrition and multiple co-morbidities coexist, it is preferable to orient older patients towards a facility specialized in the disorders of polypatho-logical elderly patients who are dependent or at risk of dependency.

The objective of such facilities is to stabilize the patient's clinical status and insure his/her return home. However, they do not have access to a multidisciplinary team that can supply rehabilitation sessions twice a day. The functional objective is thus less demanding and/or the capacity in terms of patient autonomy gain is less.

Such facilities provide care for (Expert consensus):

• patients with severe hemiplegia without any signs of recovery in the first 7 days, who have multiple indicators of a poor prognosis (Barthel Index < 20, persistent incontinence and multiple complex impairments;

• patients who do not need a coordinated multidisciplinary rehabilitation program or will not, in the immediate future, be able to take part in an exercise program at least 3 hours per day.

These patients must have access to the rehabilitation sessions dictated by their status and to a PRM expert who visits regularly to re-assess their needs as required.

1.8.4. The patients who should be oriented towards a return home

Except for the case of minor strokes that evolve spontaneously towards recovery, the decision for an early

return home for patients with deficits must be based on three criteria:

• need: a persistent incapacity that is nonetheless compatible with life at home;

• feasibility: patient residence in the same geographic zone as the hospital;

• safety: the stability of the medical situation.

This kind of return is more frequent in northern Europe than in France and is (Rank 2, Category B) significantly correlated with a better medium-term recovery in terms of preventing death or increasing autonomy and satisfaction but has no influence on the level of subjective health and mood. The positive impact of an early discharge is more significant in moderately dependent patients (initial Barthel Index > 45) (Rank 2, Category B).

This discharge mode is also more financially advantageous, resulting in cost reductions ranging from 4% to 30% (mean: 20%) by reducing the hospital stay to an average of 8 days (confidence interval at 5%: 5-11 days), without significantly increasing the risk of re-hospitalization.

Two elements are essential for the success of such early returns home:

• a home visit carried out before the patient discharge (Rank 2, Category B);

• a multidisciplinary team (physiotherapist, occupational therapist, speech therapist, doctor, nurse and social worker) who, at the end of the patient's hospital stay, takes responsibility for appropriate patient care immediately following the patient's discharge, for a period of approximately three months and a minimum frequency of four sessions per week.

This discharge mode is not very widespread in France, but should be encouraged. The goal is to propose to patients a rapid discharge from the hospital, accompanied by exercise programs at home. The Early Supported Discharge (ESD) model developed in Anglo-Saxon countries doesn't correspond exactly to the French Home Medical Care, but the correspondence is worth exploring.

ESD implies the intervention of a multidisciplinary team usually made up of doctors (PRM or not) with knowledge about stroke issues, nurses, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, speech therapists, social workers and a secretary. This team performs two types of interventions that begin the moment that the patient is discharged from the hospital and extend to his/her return home: either it coordinates the hospital discharge, the care after discharge, and the reeducation at home, or it organizes the immediate discharge, but leaves the follow-up care to a preexisting community agency.

The ESD model helps to significantly reduce the length of the hospital stay, but it has no effect on rehospitalization. This model helps to increase the patient's autonomy and to reduce recourse to institutionalization; it increases the patient's QoL but has no apparent effect on the patient's mood or on the

caregivers. The benefit of the ESD model seems to be more for the patient with a moderate degree of impairment (initial BI: > 45/100), whatever the age. The economic advantages of this model are a subject of discussion.

There are no arguments in favor of a model with a multidisciplinary team that acts essentially in the hospital compared to the same kind of team that also acts outside of the hospital. In the absence of a multidisciplinary intervention, the early long-term intervention (at least five months) of an occupational therapist in the patient's home can reduce the patient's level of impairment after an early return home (less than one month after the stroke) (Rank 2, Category B).

1.8.5. The patients who should be directed towards a facility for dependent elderly people

To the extent that the patient is able to express his/her wishes, the patient must agree to this type of discharge plan. The orientation criteria for discharge to a facility for dependent elderly people are:

• advanced age, especially those over 80 (Rank 3, Category C), but it is not the main criterion;

• social isolation, which highlights the importance of marital status and social support (Rank 4, Category C; Expert consensus);

• stroke severity, as indicated by the level of neurological impairment (based on the NIHSS score and the initial BI), particularly after cerebral hemorrhage, and preexisting or stroke-acquired cognitive disorders (e.g., dementia, depression) (Rank 3, Category C); and

• persistent swallowing disorders and/or incontinence (Rank 3, Category C).

The extent of the care needed can justify placing the patient in a long-term care facility (USLD).

The patient can be placed in a facility for dependent elderly people (EHPAD) following a stay in NVCU or medical service or following a stay in a follow-up facility that is specialized in caring for the elderly. EHPAD transfers can encounter difficulties in finding a place in a timely manner.

1.9. Maintaining the patient at home

The objective is to allow the person handicapped by a stroke to be maintained in his/her home after the stroke. The interventions needed to accomplish the objective begin by identifying the needs of both the patient and the caregivers. These needs will be assessed through questioning the patient and the caregivers, and the resulting care administered will be dictated by the possibilities for organizing care (i.e., monitoring by a general practitioner and the intervention of nursing staff, a physiotherapist and a speech therapist) as well as human (e.g., living aid, housekeeping aid) and material aid (e.g. electrical wheelchair, handicap stair lift).

The goal is to maintain, even increase, the patient's level of autonomy and improve the patient's QoL and that of his/her caregivers, while insuring an optimal level of safety in the

home. This can be accomplished through educating both the patient and caregivers and through home interventions. Failure to maintain the patient at home can be caused by the worsening of the patient's condition (e.g., intercurrent disorders, loss of autonomy) or unpredictable factors (e.g., death of the patient's spouse), but also by the exhaustion of the patient's caregivers.

When patient autonomy backslides or the patient loses interest, the intervention of a multidisciplinary team in the home of the stroke patient can help to reduce the rate of deterioration of daily activities and to increase the patient's capacity to do personal activities (Rank 3, Category C; Expert consensus). A lesser QoL is connected to being of the feminine gender, pain in the affected limbs, nutrition via a feeding tube or a ground diet, lack of physical exercise and the need for assistance.

The health care providers and caregivers need information about transfer techniques, adapting and using technical aids, fall prevention and the development of safety strategies for the home, improving communication difficulties, and adapting to the patient's visual disturbances and emotional changes (Rank 3, Category C).

Home counseling activities intended for family, friends and caregiver should include:

• information about strokes and their consequences, as well as the adaptation to persistent impairment;

• training in activities suitable for the patient's desires and needs and his/her familiar environment.

Repeated visits in the three months that follow the patient's discharge help to reduce the caregivers' load. The impact of these visits can be compared to the impact of out-patient care in physical and rehabilitation medicine, three times a week over the same period, and is significantly less expensive (Rank 4, Category C). This out-patient care can nonetheless offer much needed relief to caregivers (Professional consensus). Targeted global interventions improve the mental health of the caregivers, though it is difficult to know exactly what type of intervention, what means of intervention (home visit, telephone contact or internet contact) and what intervention frequency will be the most effective (Rank 3, Category C). Interventions by groups of caregivers and not by individual caregivers have been proposed in the literature.

In the absence of a structured multidisciplinary team, occupational therapy can have a positive effect on personal and instrumental daily activities and social participation (Rank 1, Category A). Physiotherapy in the home alone doesn't seem to have a significant effect on patient functional capacities (Rank 3).

1.10. Conclusion

The patient management plan after the acute phase of a stroke must be determined early in order to guarantee continuing care in conditions that will encourage functional recovery while contributing to the flexibility of the health care system. This plan is based on three factors:

• patient assessment: this means analyzing the early clinical criteria and their evolution, as well as the results of the MRI and the MEP, which allows the patient's typology to be defined;

• facility typology: this means knowing about the competencies and the performance of the various facilities available and orienting the patient towards the nearest most appropriate facility, without allowing any opportunity for the patient to be missed;

• survey of the patient's situation: this means that the medical team must survey the patient's family and friends to discover the patient's home environment and evaluate the capacity and desire of family and friends to provide care and the feasibility of the patient returning home.

It is a patient management process in which the PRM doctor,

the medical team and the social worker(s) play a decisive role,

starting in the initial phase of care.

Gray literature cited

1. Administrative memo DHOS/DGS/DGAS No. 517 of 3 November 2003.

2. Administrative memo DHOS/DGS/DGAS No. 108 of 22 March 2007.

3. Report on early stroke intervention by Jean Bardet, Member of Parliament. Parliamentary Office for the Evaluation of Health Care Policies. 28 September 2007.

4. International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland. 2000: 220p.

5. "Criteres de prise en charge en MPR'' (PRM care criteria) (2001 edition, chap 13, 2nd section; 2008 edition, chap 12, 2nd section). Available at www.sofmer.com.

6. Decree No. 2008-377 of 17 April 2008 pertaining to the technical operating conditions appropriate for the activities of follow-up care and rehabilitation.

7. Administrative memo No. DH0S/01/2008/305 of 03 October 2008 pertaining to the decree No. 2008-377 of 17 April 2008.

8. Law No. 2005-370 of 22 April 2005, called the Leonetti Law, pertaining to patient rights and end-of-life decisions.

9. Retour au domicile des patients adultes atteints d'accident vasculaire cerebral (Adult Stroke Patients and the Return Home). Strategy and organization. Professional Recommendations. French National Health Authority (HAS), December 2003.

Scales and indexes cited NIHSS

www.protocoles-urgences.fr/page5/files/scorenih.pdf Barthel index

www.afrek.com/fiches/rub1/bilanbarcomplet.pdf Charlson co-morbidity Index

www.rdplf.org/calculateurs/pages/charlson/charlson.html

2. Version française

2.1. Glossaire

AVQ activités de la vie quotidienne Aidants designe les personnes amenes a intervenir et a fournir une aide a la personne (surveillance, securite, aide au transfert...) qu'ils s'agissentde proches ou familiaux ou de personnes rémunerées, a l'exception des soins techniques et des soins de base (soignants). AVQ activites de la vie quotidienne EHPAD Les etablissement d'hebergement pour personnes agees dependantes sont des etablissements medicalisees hebergeant des personnes agees dependantes de 60 ans sous convention tripartite pluriannuelle entre l'etablissement, le Conseil general et la Direction Departementale de l'action sanitaire et sociale (DDASS). Ils sont partiellement medicalises : présence d'infirmieres salaries, mais aussi medecins, kinesitherapeutes, orthophonistes liberaux autant que de besoin.

ESD «early supported discharge : equipe multidisciplinaire typiquement composee de medecins connaissant la problematique de l'AVC (MPR ou non), infirmieres, ergotherapeutes, orthophonistes, assistantes sociales et secrétaire. Cette equipe intervient des l'hopital et leur intervention se poursuit au domicile IB Indice de Barthel (cotation sur 100), mesure les

incapacites liees a des deficiences motrices et viscerales

IRM imagerie par résonance magnetique

HTA hypertension arterielle

NIHSS National Institute of Health Stroke Score

PAS pression arterielle systolique

PAM pression arterielle moyenne

PEA potentiels evoques auditifs

PEM potentiels evoques moteurs

PES potentiels evoques somesthesiques

QDV qualite de vie

SSR soins de suite et de réadaptation (ex moyen-sejour)

TDM tomodensitométrie

TEP tomodensitométrie à émission de positons UNV unite neurovasculàire

USLD unite de soins de longue durée (champ sanitaire) qui auront pour mission l'hebergement de patients necessitant des soins medicotechniques importants (SMTI) correspondant a la necessite d'une prise en charge par une structure disposant de moyens matériels et humains suffisants pour assumer correctement et en toute securite des pathologies « lourdes » evolutives et/ou instables.

2.2. Recommandations

2.2.1. Comités

Comité de pilotage : Michel Barat (President), Maurice Giroud, Jacques Pelissier (secretaire),

Comite scientifique : Gilles Kemoun (secretaire-recherche bibliographique), Philippe Marque, Jean-Louis Mas, JeanPhilippe Neau (President), Denis Sablot (secretaire).

Comite de lecture : Geriatres : Marc Verny, Joel Belmin, Fabienne Yvain. Medecin Generaliste : Bernard Gay. Neurologues : Helene Mahagne, France Woimant, Mathieu Zuber. MPR : Paul Calmels, Andre Thevenon, Jean Sengler.

2.2.2. Objectif

Definir le plus précocement possible des critères pertinents d'orientation des patients atteints d'AVC a partir des unites neurovasculaires ou structures de soin aigu, afin de faciliter leur retour au domicile (ou equivalent de domicile) ou la poursuite de la prise en charge dans les structures de soin les plus adaptées.

2.2.3. Promoteurs

La Societe francaise de medecine physique et de réadaptation (Sofmer), la Societe francaise de neurovasculaire (SFNV) et la Societe francaise de geriatrie et gerontologie (SFGG).

2.2.4. Methode choisie

Conference d'experts avec audition publique selon la methode Sofmer*.

ELSEVIER MASSON

Disponible en ligne sur www-SciencedirecLcom

"•J' ScienceDirect

Annales de réadaptation et de médecine physique 50 (2007) 100-105

-NNALES d RÉADAPTATION pf MÉDECINE PHYSIQUE

bttp:.'.ifrare:c.dscvi(T.com'dircct-,ANKRMP.>

Pratiques professionnelles et recommandations

Établir des recommandations dans le domaine de la médecine physique el de réadaptation : la méthode SOFMER

F. Rannot/'*, E. Coudeyrc1'. P. Ribinikc, Y. Maoé*, S. Poiraudcau", M. Rcvela

' Servit* de rééducation. APMP. unii'ersitê Renè-liescartes. ¡¡roupe hospitalier Cochin. 27. rue du faubourg-Saint-Jacques, Paria 75014. France * CentK de A1PR Notre-Dame, BP MA, 4, ovtniit? Joseph-Clatiwat, Chamalières, 63404, Prance L .'iVrvirr de MPR, centre hospittilier de Gonesse, 25, rue Pierre-de-Theilley, BP 71, i>5503 Gonexse, France

Reçu le 3 janvier 21107 ; accepte le (0 janvier 2*X)7

Les questions et les experts. 1. Quels sont les critères de pronostic à la phase initiale (dix premiers jours) ?

1a. Quels sont les criteres de stabilisation de l'etat clinique ? Quels sont les outils cliniques dévaluation a utiliser a cette phase ? (20 min)

P. Dehail (MPR, Geriatre, Bordeaux), C. Arquizan (Neurologue, Montpellier)

1b. Quel est l'impact de l'imagerie ?

1. Sibon (Neurologue, Bordeaux), P. Menegon (Neuroradiologue, Bordeaux)

1c. Quel est l'impact de la neurophysiologie ?

G. Nicolas (Neurologue, Angers)

1d. Quel est l'impact de la neurobiologie ?

G. Godeneche (Neurologue, Poitiers)

2. Quel est l'impact de l'etat physiologique du patient et de son environnement ?

2a. Quel est l'impact de l'age et des polypathologies ?

F. Mounier-Vehier (Neurologue, Lens), J. Boddaert (Geriatre, Pitie-Salpetriere)

2b. Quel est l'impact de l'etat thymique et cognitif ?

H. Henon (Neurologue, Lille), J.M. Wirotius (MPR, Brive)

2c. Quel est l'impact de la famille et des conditions de vie

(materielle, architecturales) sur l'orientation ?

M. Rousseaux (MPR, Lille), V. Wolff (Neurologue, Strasbourg)

3. Quels sont les criteres d'orientation au dela de la phase initiale (dix premiers jours) ?

3 a. Quels patients orienter vers le domicile et sur quels criteres (exclus les AIT et inclus les accidents mineurs) ?

C. Benaim (MPR, Nice), T. Moulin (Neurologue, Besancon), D. Perennou (MPR, Dijon)

3b. Comment orienter l'AVC sévère (hématome ou infarctus massif avec ou sans craniectomie, accident du tronc cerebral et LIS, malformation vasculaire complique) ?

J. Froger (MPR, Nîmes), R. Robert (Reanimateur-Poitiers), S. Crozier (Neurologue, Pitie-Salpetriere), B. Bataille (Neurochirurgien, Poitiers)

3c. Quel patient orienter vers les soins de suite et de readaptation specialises en neurologie et sur quels criteres ? Quel patient orienter vers les soins de suite et de readaptation non specialises et sur quels criteres ?

J.-C. Daviet (MPR, Limoges), P. Decavel (Neurologue, Besancon)

4. Quel est l'impact de l'organisation intrahospitaliere et de l'organisation sanitaire et sociale sur le territoire ?

4a. Quel patient orienter provisoirement vers l'HAD ?

5. Timsit (Neurologue, Brest), A. Schnitzler (MPR, Garches)

4b. Quel patient orienter vers un Samad (Service d'accompagnement et de maintien a domicile) ?

F. Pellas (MPR, Nîmes), J.-F. Pinel (Neurologue, Rennes)

4c. Quel patient orienter vers un EHPAD ?

T. Vogel (Geriatre, Strasbourg), M. Bruandet (Neurologue, Saint-Joseph)

4d. Conditions du maintien au domicile d'un patient deficitaire après AVC ? Conditions du maintien au domicile d'un patient deficitaire après AVC ?

O. Simon (MPR, Bichat), G. Rodier (Neurologue, Mulhouse)

2.3. Calendrier

Chronologie

Comite

Action

2 juillet 2007 Reunion tel

17 septembre 2007 Reunion tel

17 Septembre 2007 Reunion tel

8 octobre 2007 Reunion physique et tel

(grève SNCF et RATP) Hôpital Saint-Anne, Paris

9 septembre 2008 Reunion physique Hopital Cochin Paris

Comite de pilotage 4 a 10 membres (societes promotrices, divers modes d'exercice et lieux)

Comite scientifique

6 a 10 membres (societes representees, divers modes d'exercice et lieux)

Documentalistes

UFR medecine Poitiers

Comite scientifique et Comite d'experts (2 experts par question ou sous-question)

(societes promotrices, divers modes d'exercice et lieux)

Comite Scientifique et Comite d'experts

Choix des questions Organisation materielle

Designation du conseil scientifique et du Comite de lecture

Diriger analyse de la litterature (bases, mots cles) et developpement des recommandations Designe un comite de lecture

Recherche bibliographique Selection de resumes

Soumission au Comite Scientifique qui selectionne les articles

Distribution des articles aux experts

Analyse des articles, niveau de preuve, grade de recommandations

Redaction d'un rapport par chaque expert independamment

Mise en commun et Harmonisation Consensus sur les recommandations

(Suite)

Chronologie

Comité

Action

9 septembre 2008 Réunion physique Hôpital Cochin, Paris

22 octobre 2008 Conference d'experts avec audition publique

30 novembre 2008 Echanges eml

15 décembre 2008

Comité scientifique

Comité de Pilotage, Comite scientifique et Comite d'experts

Audition publique devant les membres des Societes promotrices

Comite de lecture

10 ai2 membres : multidisciplinaire

Revues scientifiques et sites des Societes partenaires

Élaboration d'un questionnaire dévaluation des pratiques

Presentation des conclusions par les experts. Recueil des pratiques. Discussion. Recueil des conclusions

Avis critique puis redaction definitive de recommandations conformes a la litterature, aux prescriptions francaises en pratique quotidienne et agreees par le comite de lecture

Publications de ces Recommandations

2.4. Introduction

L'accident vasculaire cerebral (AVC) est en Éurope la premiere cause de handicap. Appliques a la demographie francaise, les donnees europeennes font etat de 140 000 AVC par an (176 000 avec les récidives), et celles du registre de Dijon de 91 800 AVC par an. Le PMSI a enregistre en 2005, 130 000 sejours pour AVC dans les etablissements publics et prives (dont la moite a plus de 70 ans); un patient sur quatre patients va deceder et un sur quatre gardera des sequelles.

La Circulaire DHOS/DGS/DGAS no 517 du 3 novembre 2003 decrit l'organisation des soins des la phase initiale ; elle definit le concept d'unite neurovasculaire (UNV), initie la constitution de filieres de soin régionales qui ont ete depuis lors mises en place. La Circulaire DHOS/DGS/DGAS no 108 du 22 mars 2007 la complete. L'une et l'autre soulignent l'importance de la fluidite de la filiere afin de garantir la meilleure prise en charge en aval des patients deficitaires et la capacite d'accueil de l'amont. Le rapport sur la prise en charge précoce des accidents vasculaires cerébraux, par M. Jean Bardet, depute, va dans le meme sens.

La phase initiale correspond aux soins initiaux (service d'urgence, unite neurovasculaire, neuroréanimation, medecine) jusqu'a stabilisation de l'etat clinique du patient ; elle correspond approximativement aux dix premiers jours. Passee cette phase l'orientation du patient vers le domicile ou la structure de soin la plus adaptee doit repondre a des criteres garantissant :

• l'acces du patient a la structure la plus apte a ameliorer son status fonctionnel en tenant compte de son lieu de vie, de ses besoins en soin, de la technologie et de la capacite de soin offertes par la structure la plus appropriée ;

• la fluidite de la filiere de soin sans faire courir a chaque patient le risque de perte de chance.

Au-dela de l'objectif vital, l'objectif fonctionnel, c'est-a-dire l'acquisition d'un fonctionnement autonome et d'une

qualite de vie satisfaisante au sens de la Classification internationale du fonctionnement, du handicap et de la sante (CIF), reste l'objectif ultime et seule une structure de soins de suite et de readaptation adaptee et performante peut le fournir. L'enquete nationale SFNV-SOFMÉR 2008, incluant 165 services de neurologie, rapporte un retour au domicile de 37 %, un taux de transfert en medecine physique et de readaptation (MPR) de 24 % et en SSR non specialises de 14 %, ce qui est proche des chiffres de la précedente enquete de 1999.

La Circulaire DHOS/DGS/DGAS no 517 du 3 novembre 2003 souligne l'importance « d'une articulation entre soins aigus et soins de suite et de readaptation (SSR) » et de « l'organisation de filieres d'aval afin d'eviter la saturation des UNV ». Cependant, les criteres d'orientation des patients ne sont pas réellement detailles. Certes une réponse a ete apportee par la publication des 2001 des « Criteres de prise en charge en MPR » (edition 2001, chap 13, IIe partie ; edition 2008, chap 12, IIe partie ).

Il apparaissait des lors essentiel aux medecins de MPR, neurologues, geriatres et generalistes tous confrontes a la prise en charge de l'AVC, de determiner des criteres robustes et utiles d'orientation tenant compte des donnees les plus actuelles portant tant sur les facteurs du pronostic vital et fonctionnel que sur les acquis les plus récents des techniques de reeducation des deficiences cognitives, motrices, sensorielles, viscerales de ces patients, des programmes de readaptation et des actions de reinsertion. C'est l'objectif principal de ces recommandations.

La Circulaire DHOS/DGS/DGAS no 517 du 3 novembre 2003 distingue dans le secteur de SSR la MPR et les services de soins de suite medicalises (SSMÉD ou soins polyvalents). Cette classification n'est plus de mise depuis la publication du Decret no 2008-377 du 17 avril 2008 qui definit l'organisation du SSR en fonction du chemin clinique du patient (en fait des affections en cause) et non plus en fonction de la typologie des structures, faisant priorite a la proximite des soins de SSR. La circulaire no DHOS/O1/2008/305 du 03 octobre 2008 relative aux decrets no 2008-377 du 17 avril 2008 réglementant l'activite de soins de suite et de readaptation definit un cadre très general dans lequel

la prise en charge des affections neurologiques (dont l'AVC) va s'inscrire (fiche B). Les objectifs y sont très generalistes. Il importera donc en fonction de l'etat du patient et des objectifs de soin, d'aborder avec plus de precisions ce que l'on peut attendre de la structure de SSR vers laquelle on l'oriente. C'est l'objectif secondaire de ces recommandations.

Afin de ne pas surcharger le propos, il a été choisi de ne pas faire figurer systematiquement le niveau de preuve et la graduation dans le texte de recommandations. Niveau de preuve, graduation et references bibliographiques figureront avec l'argumentaire des experts en réponse aux différentes questions qui sera publieé en 2009 par les trois societes savantes partenaires.

2.5. Criteres de pronostic des la phase initiale

2.5.1. Les outils dévaluation cliniques

Trois outils cliniques sont indispensables car juges robustes et reproductibles a cette phase.

2.5.1.1. National Institute of Health Stroke Score ou NIHSS. Developpe pour les essais de phase aigue il s'agit d'un score cote de 0 a 42 et comprenant 11 items. Il permet une analyse quantitative du deficit neurologique (ou des deficiences d'origine neurologiques). Il a une très bonne reproductibilite inter- et intra-observateur. Il est rapide de realisation (moins de dix minutes). C'est le score de reference a la phase aigue des AVC (Niveau 2, Grade B). Ses limites resident dans revaluation des infarctus cerèbraux hemispheriques gauches qui sont moins bien evalues du fait des troubles du langage ou droits du fait de la negligence, et dans le « cutoff » du score pour prédire revolution qui pourrait etre differente en cas d'atteinte de la circulation anterieure ou posterieure. Le NIHSS initial serait prédictif de revolution initiale et prédictif de revolution clinique a trois mois.

Categories de NIHSS :

• NIHSS < 7 : bon pronostic (absence d'aggravation et bonne recuperation a trois mois) ;

• NIHSS > 16 : mauvais pronostic (surtout si > 22) ;

• NIHSS 7-16 : score intermediaire.

2.5.1.2. Score de Glasgow. Ce score aurait une valeur predictive a moyen terme pour la mortalite et la recuperation après un AVC recent. Il aurait une valeur pronostique surtout pour les hemorragies et infarctus graves (Niveau 2, Grade B).

2.5.1.3. Score de Barthel ou IB

Il permet l'estimation du devenir fonctionnel des patients au stade de la prise en charge en reeducation. L'IB initial a la phase aigue de l'AVC a une valeur predictive pour la durée du sejour hospitalier, le niveau de recuperation fonctionnelle et la destination a la sortie (Niveau 2, Grade B). La progression de l'IB entre j2 et j15 est l'un des principaux facteurs prédictifs du devenir fonctionnel a un an.

Mais persistent des questions quant au seuil permettant de definir un bon pronostic fonctionnel et le moment optimal de

passation de cet index. Par ailleurs, cet index n'est pas adapte a la phase très précoce post AVC (patient alite) du fait de la possible sous estimation des aptitudes fonctionnelles.

Les valeurs de ces indices doivent tenir compte de marqueurs de stabilite clinique qui ont egalement une valeur pronostique.

2.5.1.3.1. Pression artérielle (PA). L'influence des valeurs de la PA est controversee.

Il existerait un impact pejoratif d'une pression artérielle systolique (PAS) ou pression arterielle moyenne (PAM) d'admission elevee sur le pronostic vital et fonctionnel a court (premier mois), moyen (trois mois) et long termes (superieur a un an). Une hypertension arterielle (HTA) developpee dans les 24 heures post-AVC (et non une HTA chronique) serait associee a une degradation du pronostic a trois mois comme l'association de troubles de la conscience. L'augmentation de la PAM dans les premiers jours serait plus pejorative que la valeur de la PAM initiale (pronostic a un et troismois). L'augmentation de la PA pulsee (differentielle) dans les premieres heures post-AVC serait associee a une aggravation du pronostic fonctionnel a trois mois, a une augmentation de la mortalite et du risque de récidive a un an.

Dans d'autres etudes, l'augmentation de la PAS dans les 24 heures serait associee a une amelioration du pronostic a court et moyen termes, tandis que la diminution de la PAS (> 20 mmHg) induite par le traitement serait associee a une degradation de l'etat neurologique et du pronostic contrairement a la diminution spontanee de la PAS.

La relation entre la PA et le pronostic des patients AVC suivrait une courbe en U avec une influence pejorative des valeurs extremes de PA (complications cerébrales lorsque la PA est trop elevee, complications cardiaques lorsque la PA est trop basse) (Niveau 1, Grade A). La PA systolique optimale evolue entre 150 et 180 mmHg, la PA diastolique entre 90 et 130 mmHg.

2.5.1.3.2. Hyper/hypothermie, hypoxie. Une hyperthermie meme moderée a ete associee a une plus grande severite de l'AVC, a une degradation significative du pronostic vital et fonctionnel a 48 h, a un et cinq ans et au retard a la sortie de l'UNV et de l'unite de reeducation (Niveau 2, Grade B),. La definition de l'hyperthermie n'apparaît pas consensuelle. Én ce qui concerne le delai d'apparition, seule l'augmentation de temperature observee au-dela de la huitième heure post-AVC etait associee au devenir a trois mois et etait dependante de la

severite de i'AVC.

L'impact d'une hypothermie initiale sur le devenir fonctionnel et la mortalite post-AVC est controverse.

Une hypoxie initiale (SaO2 < a 90 ou 92 %) est associee a une aggravation du score NIHSS et a une augmentation de la mortalite a trois mois (Niveau 2, Grade B).

2.5.1.3.3. Troubles de deglutition. L'existence (la persistance) de troubles de la deglutition a la phase initiale post-AVC ont ete associees a moyen et long termes a un plus mauvais pronostic fonctionnel, a une augmentation du risque d'institutionnalisation et a une augmentation du taux de mortalite (Niveau 2, Grade B).

2.5.1.3.4. Incontinence urinaire. L'existence (ou la persistance) d'une incontinence urinaire a la phase initiale représente un facteur independant de mauvais pronostic fonctionnel et de surmortalite a trois mois. Elle est associee au niveau d'incapacite, a la diminution de la qualite de vie (QDV) et au risque d'institutionnalisation (Niveau 2, Grade B). Elle est associee a une augmentation des complications infectieuses urinaires et des etats de malnutrition.

2.5.2. Les examens complémentaires

Ils permettent d'approcher précocement l'etat anatomique, metabolique et physiologique du parenchyme cerébral lese, alors que deja s'amorcent les processus de réparation et de plasticite. Phenomene multifactoriel d'une grande complexite, pouvant a chaque instant etre remis en cause, le processus de réparation ne peut etre prédit avec certitude en l'etat actuel de nos connaissances par ces seules explorations.

2.5.2.1. L'imagerie. Il importe de visualiser le parenchyme cerébral, sa vascularisation et sa perfusion. L'imagerie aide a mieux connaître le pronostic vital, mais aussi fonctionnel, ainsi que des pronostics specifiques (epilepsie, parkinson et demence vasculaires).

L'imagerie par résonance magnetique nucleaire (IRM) et la tomodensitometrie (TDM) evaluent le type, le volume, la localisation et le nombre de lesions, les anomalies préexistantes ; ils visualisent les lesions de la leuco-encephalopathie et les micro-saignements.

Le volume du territoire atteint paraît corréle avec le pronostic vital en cas d'hematome comme d'infarctus cerébral, dans ce cas surtout chez le sujet jeune ; pour le pronostic fonctionnel, l'association est debattue en cas d'infarctus cerébral (Grade C), mais un volume d'hematome superieur a 30 ml a un mauvais pronostic fonctionnel bien que cela depende de la localisation, l'impact n'etant pas le meme en fonction de cette localisation (Niveau 2, Grade B). Il n'y a pas de lien clairement etabli entre l'infarctus cerébral et les pronostics specifiques mais en ce qui concerne l'hematome intracerébral, il y aurait un lien avec le risque d'epilepsie vasculaire.

Quant a la localisation lesionnelle, le pronostic fonctionnel serait plus mauvais en cas d'infarctus de l'artere cerébrale moyenne et d'infarctus cerébraux territoriaux plutot que sous-corticaux profonds ou jonctionnels. La localisation d'un hematome dans la fosse posterieure est un enjeu vital (Niveau 3, Grade C, Consensus d'experts) mais l'influence de la localisation de l'hematome sur le pronostic fonctionnel est discutee. Il ne semble pas y avoir de corrélation systematique entre syndrome parkinsonien vasculaire ou demence vasculaire et la localisation lesionnelle. En ce qui concerne l'epilepsie, il semble qu'on puisse faire uniquement un lien entre epilepsie partielle et lesion corticale.

En revanche, le nombre de lesions semble corréle au pronostic fonctionnel, au risque d'epilepsie vasculaire et on se pose la question de la corrélation avec le risque de deterioration cognitive (Niveau 2, Grade B). Les signes de rupture de la barrière hemato-encephalique sont lies a une sur-mortalite

30 jours après l'hematome intracerébral et a un mauvais pronostic fonctionnel (Niveau 2, Grade B). Il n'y a pas de donnees sur les pronostics specifiques. Enfin, les remaniements hemorragiques sont de mauvais pronostic vital s'ils sont superieurs a 25 ml (Niveau 2, Grade B). Leur corrélation avec le pronostic fonctionnel est discutee.

Les anomalies préexistantes ont aussi un role. Les signes de leuco-encephalopathie donnent un plus mauvais pronostic vital et fonctionnel et signent une augmentation du risque de récidive d'AVC, de demence vasculaire, de syndrome parkinsonien vasculaire (Niveau 2, Grade B). Les micro-saignements sont corréles au degré de leuco-encephalopathies et sont associes à une augmentation du risque de récidive ischemique et hemorragique.

L'angio-TDM et l'angio-IRM permettent de visualiser la permeabilite vasculaire et les sites d'occlusion. L'imagerie de diffusion et de perfusion a la phase aigue permet une prédiction de l'etendue de l'infarctus et constitue un element du pronostic vital (Niveau 2, Grade B). Le site de l'occlusion, les possibilites de la repermeabilisation arterielle ont une incidence sur le pronostic vital et fonctionnel entre un et trois mois ; la reperfusion serait un facteur de bon pronostic si elle est suffisamment précoce, en particulier dans le territoire vertebro-basilaire.

L'IRM fonctionnelle, et la tomographie a emission de positons (TEP), donnant des indications sur les modifications fonctionnelles et neurochimiques, sont peu etudies a la phase aigue et ont peu d'impact pratique a l'heure actuelle.

2.5.2.2. La neurophysiologie. Les potentiels evoques moteurs (PEM) semblent pouvoir donner une valeur pronostique additionnelle par rapport aà l'imagerie ou aà la clinique. Il existe une corrélation entre PEM des membres superieurs au stade précoce et pronostic a long terme des AVC ischemiques. La réalisation de PEM présente peut etre un interét dans les atteintes initiales compleàtes ou aà l'inverse dans les formes peu severes (Niveau 2, Grade B). Les PEM renseignent plus sur la récuperation de la force que sur la récuperation fonctionnelle (Niveau 2, Grade B). Certaines questions restent en suspens comme les muscles a utiliser, le delai ideal pour pratiquer cet examen et l'interêt des PEM des membres inferieurs.

Les potentiels evoques sensitifs (PES), quoique peu etudies, ne semblent pas apporter d'elements probants par rapport aux PEM. Les potentiels evoques auditifs du tronc cerébral (PEA) pourraient avoir un interét dans les formes graves.

2.5.2.3. Les parametres biologiques. De nombreuses etudes ont montre qu'un taux de glycemie eleve a la phase initiale etait associe a un plus mauvais pronostic, a un risque plus important de deterioration neurologique précoce (dans les 48 heures), a un infarctus de taille plus importante.

Les biomarqueurs refletent la gliose cerébrale (Proteine S100,NSE), l'excito-toxicite (Glutamate, GABA), l'inflammation (Cytokines : Il-6, TNF-alpha ; C-réactive proteine ; molecules d'adhesion cellulaire : VCAM1, ICAM1), le stress oxydatif (Ferritine, bilirubinemie, NO), les lesions endothe-liales (Fibronectine, MMP9, endotheline-1, albuminurie), l'etat

de coagulation (Fibrinogene, PAI1, D-Dimeres). Bien que de nombreux biomarqueurs aient ete etudies surtout au cours des AVC ischemiques, très peu l'ont ete a la phase aigue des hemorragies cerebrales, et aucun n'est actuellement valide en tant qu'outil pronostique.

2.6. Facteurs cliniques influençant le pronostic

2.6.1. L'age et les polypathologies

2.6.1.1. L'age. L'âge pris comme critere lineaire est associe a un pronostic vital plus pejoratif (Niveau 1, Grade A). En ce qui concerne le pronostic fonctionnel la majorite des etudes vont dans le sens d'une influence negative de l'age, mais plusieurs contestent ce role negatif ou son caractere independant (Grade C). La recherche d'une valeur seuil a fait l'objet de plusieurs publications. Il semblerait que la population de plus de 85 ans ait un pronostic vital ou fonctionnel moins bon (Consensus d'experts).

2.6.1.2. Polypathologie. Une perte d'autonomie préalable a l'AVC de meme que l'etat general pré-AVC seraient corréles a l'augmentation de la mortalité et de la dependance a severité d'AVC egale (Niveau 2, Grade B).

2.6.1.3. Diabète. Le diabete a un impact sur le pronostic vital et fonctionnel qui est plus sombre (Niveau 2, Grade B).

2.6.1.4. Cardiopathie ischemique et fibrillation atriale. Il existe une corrélation significative avec le risque de deces, d'augmentation du handicap et d'institutionnalisation (Niveau 2, Grade B).

Il est possible d'utiliser un index de comorbidité, l'index de Charlson (Absence de Consensus) mais les résultats inhomogenes des etudes ne permettent pas de conclure.

2.6.2. L'etat thymique et cognitif

2.6.2.1. Troubles cognitifs et pronostic fonctionnel. Les troubles cognitifs non-dementiels ont une influence pejorative sur le devenir fonctionnel a court et moyen termes. Ils augmentent le risque de perte d'autonomie et le risque d'institutionnalisation (Niveau 2, Grade B). L'influence est variable en fonction du domaine cognitif atteint (troubles de l'attention ou deficit global) (Niveau 2, Grade B). On ne connaât pas de seuil de severité a partir duquel le devenir fonctionnel est affecte.

La récuperation fonctionnelle apparaât plus lente, de moins bonne qualité mais elle reste présente.

L'heminegligence influe pejorativement sur le devenir fonctionnel, introduisant un retard dans les acquisitions en particulier posturales (Niveau 1, Grade A). Les donnees concernant l'influence de l'anosognosie persistante assoctée à l'heminegligence sont discordantes, plutôt en faveur d'une influence pejorative. La réeducation paraât moins efficace en cas de negligence. La question de l'intérêt de la réeducation (vs pas de réeducation) pour les grands negligents est posee.

Concernant l'aphasie et le devenir fonctionnel, les résultats sont discordants. L'influence pejorative pourrait

dependre du type d'aphasie. L'aphasie globale serait un facteur de mauvaise réponse en reeducation, avec intervention des troubles de la comprehension (Grade C). Cependant, les patients avec des troubles de comprehension font egalement des progrès en reeducation (Grade C, Consensus d'experts).

Les donnees actuelles ne permettent pas de conclure a l'incidence des apraxies en termes de devenir fonctionnel.

La demence post-AVC est assoctée a un pronostic fonctionnel defavorable (Niveau 2, Grade B). Ces patients sont plus dependants pour les activités de la vie quotidienne (AVQ) et le risque d'institutionnalisation a distance est augmente.

2.6.2.2. Depression et devenir fonctionnel. Il existe un lien entre depression post-AVC et pronostic fonctionnel. Cependant, on ne sait pas si les troubles de l'humeur sont la cause ou la consequence des troubles fonctionnels.

L'influence des troubles de l'humeur sur les capacités de recuperation et le benefice de la reeducation n'apparaît pas majeure. La plupart des etudes n'ont pas montre d'influence de la depression sur le gain obtenu en reeducation, ni sur l'efficacité de la reeducation. D'autres ont suggerè une recuperation quantitativement aussi importante mais plus lente. L'eventuel intérêt des traitements antidepresseurs pour ameliorer le pronostic fonctionnel après un AVC reste a determiner.

2.7. Facteurs familiaux et sociaux influencant le pronostic

L'entourage familial est un acteur essentiel conditionnant le mode de sortie et la durée d'hospitalisation.

Les facteurs favorisant le retour a domicile sont la vie en couple, un age jeune, un niveau moderé de handicap, le niveau social (Niveau 1, Grade A). La durée d'hospitalisation courte est conditionne par le soutien familial et le sexe masculin (Niveau 1, Grade A).

Un statut socioeconomique (SSE) faible est non seulement un facteur de risque d'AVC mais encore de mortalité post AVC (Niveau 1, Grade A). Les patients sont alors plus souvent institutionnalises et necessitent plus d'aide dans les AVQ personnelles. Il existe un risque accru de dependance et de deces. Un support familial important, efficace et organise, ameliore ainsi le statut fonctionnel.

Le handicap du patient n'est pas sans consequences sur les proches (Niveau 3, Grade C, Consensus d'experts). On retrouve des troubles anxiodepressifs plus severes a trois mois qu'a un an, evoluant en parallele avec l' evolution de l'etat des patients. Jouent un role les troubles cognitifs et comportementaux du patient, ses deficits physiques et sa dependance, la qualité de la relation du proche avec le patient et dans une moindre mesure la propre santé physique et mentale du proche. En ce qui concerne la qualité de vie on observe une augmentation de la perception de contrainte et de la morbidité psychologique, un effet detétère sur la santé sociale et une atteinte globale de la vie sociale. La qualité de vie apparaît stable a trois mois et un an.

2.8. Les criteres d'orientation et les choix

Les « Stroke Unit » anglo-saxons, associant le plus souvent prise en charge aigue et soins interdisciplinaires de reeducation, ameliorent le pronostic vital et fonctionnel des patients après AVC, y compris pour les AVC severes.

L'organisation du systeme de sante francais, dans lequel structures de soin aigu et de soin de suite sont dissociees, impose de formaliser cette orientation le plus précocement possible pour garantir une certaine fluidite a la filiere et offrir au patient la meilleure qualite de prise en charge. Compte tenu de la technicite de certaines prises en charge, on doit admettre que les structures de soin les plus proches ne sont pas toujours les plus a meme de fournir les soins les plus adaptes.

Si le gain maximum d'autonomie et au dela le retour a des conditions de vie les plus proches de celles qui etaient celles du patient avant l'ictus est l'objectif ultime, pour l'atteindre plusieurs eventualites sont offertes dans notre systeme de sante :

• le retour au domicile ;

• l'institutionnalisation en ÉHPAD ;

• le transfert en structure de SSR specialisee en affections du systeme nerveux avec plateau technique de reeducation et de readaptation adapte a la prise en charge de la deficience neurologique ; au sein de ce type de structure, on doit distinguer l'unite de reeducation et readaptation specialisee pour cerébroleses, orientee plus specialement vers les prise en charge complexes, disposant de moyens specifique et en filiere avec les UNV (cf. infra) ;

• le transfert en structure de SSR non specialisee ou specialisee en affections de la personne agee polypathologique dependante ou a risque de dependance ;

• la prise en charge en HAD ou equivalent.

Én fonction des evaluations cliniques répetees du patient dans les premiers jours, des explorations complementaires et de la disponibilite des proches, de l'environnement, le choix de la structure doit reposer sur les besoins du patient tout en tenant compte des ressources locales. Pour le bon fonctionnement de la filiere de soins, cette orientation doit respecter deux imperatifs :

• imperatif individuel : meilleure adequation possible entre les besoins et possibilites des patients et les prestations de ces services, sans perte de chance pour les patients ;

• imperatif organisationnel : précocite de l'orientation et meilleur delai possible de transfert afin d'assurer la fluidite de la filiere et de faire beneficier le plus grand nombre de patients d'une prise en charge par une structure dediee, notamment a la phase aigue de l'AVC.

2.8.1. Les AVC severes (hematome ou infarctus massif avec ou sans crâniectomie, accident du tronc cerebral et LIS, malformation vasculaire compliquee)

La severite des deficiences motrices, cognitives, viscerales et leur vulnerabilite conferent a ces patients un profil particulier.

Bien que la definition de l'AVC severe ne soit pas univoque, on peut considerer comme severe les AVC avec score NIHSS superieur a 16 (Niveau 2, Grade B).

La prise en charge des AVC severes en structure de reeducation et readaptation specialisee pour cerébroleses est utile notamment pour réduire la mortalite et favoriser le retour a domicile (Niveau 1, Grade A). De telles structures, coordonnees par un medecin de MPR, mettent a la disposition de ces patients :

• une equipe infirmiere entraînee aux soins de prevention des complications de l'immobilite, aux soins de canule de tracheotomie et a la gestion d'une alimentation enterale par sonde nasogastrique ou gastrojejunostomie, a la detection d'une complications neurologique (comitialite) ou autre complication a craindre chez ce type de patient ;

• une equipe de reeducation et de readaptation multidiscipli-naire formee et entraînee a la prise en charge de la cerébrolesion dans ses composantes motrice, sensitive (douleur) et sensorielle, cognitive, et viscerale.

Compte tenu du risque de decompensation ou d'aggravation, l'acces a un service de reanimation, a une unite d'imagerie et de neurophysiologie est indispensable (Consensus d'experts).

Une telle organisation peut se concevoir en filiere lorsque l'UNV ne comprend pas en son sein une unite d'hospitalisation de reeducation et readaptation mais est en lien etroit avec une telle structure de reeducation specialisee et réferente, structure qui peut etre organisee en unite de soins intermediaires ou de postréanimation (Consensus d'experts).

Lorsque le patient a pu etre admis en reanimation, l'orientation au-dela du dixieme jour depend de la situation clinique dans laquelle se trouve le patient. La sortie de reanimation ne peut etre envisagee que lorsque l'etat physiologique est stabilise et qu'il ne necessite plus de surveillance particuliere.

Schematiquement on peut envisager trois situations cliniques et des aspects particuliers :

• le malade est conscient, sevré de la ventilation artificielle sans ou avec tracheotomie (besoins en apport oxygene réduits mais necessite d'aspirations tracheales quatre a six fois par jour au plus). Le transfert en unite de soins intermediaires ou postréanimation paraît le plus adapte ; il doit y avoir a tout moment dans ces unites la possibilite d'intervention rapide d'un reanimateur, et si necessaire transfert en reanimation (Niveau 4, Grade C et Consensus professionnel) ;

• le malade est en etat vegetatif ou en etat pauci-relationnel, sevré de la ventilation artificielle. La prise en charge de tels patients et leur devenir depasse le cadre du patient ayant un AVC, pour etre aborde de facon globale dans le cadre du devenir et de l'orientation de ces patients paucirelationnels ou en etat vegetatif prolonge ;

• le malade présente un coma persistant et est toujours en ventilation artificielle. Dans ces situations, les decisions de limitations et/ou d'arrêt therapeutiques doivent etre discutees selon les recommandations de la Societe de reanimation de

langue francaise et dans le cadre legislatif (Loi no 2005370 du 22 avril 2005 relative aux droits des malades et a la fin de vie, dite loi Leonetti). La decision doit etre collegiale et les informations clairement enoncees aux familles.

Il n'existe pas de donnees specifiques a l'AVC et ces deux situations depassent le champ de ces recommandations.

On doit considerer deux situations de deficits severes justifiant une prise en charge en structure de reeducation specialisee pour cerèbrotéses :

• les AVC cerébraux malins dont l'hemicraniectomie decompressive, rèalisee précocement, ameliore le pronostic vital et fonctionnel des patients de moins de 60 ans victimes d'un AVC malin de l'artere cerébrale moyenne. L'âge inferieur a 60 ans et la précocité du geste sont des elements en faveur d'un devenir fonctionnel meilleur, il convient de tenir compte de ces elements pour l'orientation secondaire de ces patients (Niveau 4, Grade C et Consensus professionnel) ;

• les AVC par occlusion du tronc basilaire, de pronostic particulierement defavorable, avec une survie dans moins de 30 % des cas et au prix d'un handicap le plus souvent très lourd comme « le locked-in syndrome ». La thrombolyse intra-artérielle ou a defaut intraveineuse est recommandee pour un certain nombre de patients après occlusion du tronc basilaire (Niveau 2, Grade B). La recanalisation précoce du tronc basilaire permet d'ameliorer le pronostic vital et fonctionnel des patients (Niveau 2, Grade B), il convient d'en tenir compte pour l'orientation secondaire de ces patients (Niveau 4, Grade C et Consensus professionnel). Ces patients beneficient d'une prise en charge en structure de reeducation neurologique specialisee.

2.8.2. Les patients a orienter vers le SSR specialise en affections neurologiques

Les patients après AVC ont une meilleure recuperation fonctionnelle s'ils sont pris en charge dans une unite avec plateau technique de reeducation et de readaptation specialise en reeducation neurologique, ce qui implique la possibilité d'au moins deux prises en charge techniques quotidiennes, avec, en fonction des besoins kinesitherapie, ergotherapie, orthophonie, neuropsychologie, appareillage ; tous les sous groupes d'AVC tirent un benefice plus ou moins important d'une prise en charge en reeducation coordonnee multidisciplinaire (Niveau 1, Grade A).

Cependant, les patients avec une hemiptégie de gravite intermediaire tirent le plus grand benefice d'une telle prise en charge. La valeur du NIHSS initial a ete mise en avant, cependant il est beaucoup moins precis dans les AVC de gravite intermediaire ou grave pour prévoir le potentiel de recuperation. C'est pourtant dans de telles structures, dans la mesure ou elles sont suffisamment proches du domicile, que le patient a le plus de chance d'acquerir de l'autonomie et de voir régresser ses deficiences.

Les elements influencant l'orientation dans les principales recommandations sont des critères composites :

• certains sont robustes et reproductibles : stabilisation clinique, negligence, douleur, troubles de la deglutition, capacité a apprendre, endurance ;

• d'autres sont moins reproductibles : fonctions cognitives et statut emotionnel, troubles de la communication, mobilité et autonomie dans les AVQ, continence, incapacité dans plusieurs secteurs, besoin de surveillance medicale 24/24, environnement familial.

Au total, compte tenu de notre organisation sanitaire et des outils disponibles, on peut proposer une prise en charge en SSR specialise en affections neurologiques (Consensus d'experts) :

• hemiptégie de gravite intermediaire (NIHSS entre 5 et 15 et Barthel Index > 20) avec un debut d'amelioration dans les sept premiers jours ;

• hemiplegies plus graves chez des sujets plus jeunes dans la mesure ou il n'y a pas a proximité de structure de reeducation et readaptation specialisee pour cerébroleses ;

• patients qui sont en mesure de participer a au moins trois heures de reeducation par jour, si ce n'est au debut du moins a brève echeance, dans un programme de reeducation multidisciplinaire coordonne.

2.8.3. Les patients a orienter vers les SSR non specialises ou specialises en affections de la personne âgée polypathologique dépendante ou a risque de dependance

L'orientation vers le SSR specialise en affections de la personne agee polypathologique dependante ou a risque de dependance est preferable des que coexistent troubles cognitifs, fragilité, denutrition et polymorbidité.

De telles structures ont pour objectif la stabilisation clinique du patient et son retour au domicile ; mais elles ne disposent pas d'une equipe multidisciplinaire susceptible de fournir une prise en charge biquotidienne de reeducation et de readaptation. L'objectif fonctionnel y est moins exigeant et/ou la capacité de gain d'autonomie du patient jugee moindre.

Une telle structure accueille (Consensus d'experts) :

• hemiptégie grave sans signe de recuperation dans les sept premiers jours avec presence de signes de mauvais pronostic (Barthel < 20/100, persistance d'une incontinence, multiplicité et complexité des deficiences) ;

• n'ayant pas besoin d'un programme de reeducation multidisciplinaire coordonne ou n'etant pas en mesure de participer a au moins trois heures de reeducation par jour a brève echeance.

Ces patients doivent avoir acces aux soins de reeducation que necessite leur etat et a une expertise MPR règuliere pour reevaluer leurs besoins.

2.8.4. Les patients a orienter vers le domicile

Hors le cas des AVC mineurs evoluant spontanement vers la recuperation, on doit avoir en tète que le retour précoce au domicile est base sur trois critères :

• le besoin : la persistance d'une incapacite compatible ave c la vie au domicile ;

• la faisabilite : la residence du patient dans la meme zone geographique que l'hopital ;

• la securite : la stabilite au plan medical.

Ce mode de retour, plus frequent dans l'Éurope du nord qu'en France, est (Niveau 2 ; Grade B) :

• significativement associe a une meilleure evolution a moyen terme (de trois a 12 mois, mediane a six mois), que ce soit en termes de deces, d'autonomie ou de satisfaction ;

• sans influence sur le niveau de sante subjective et l'humeur.

Ce mode de sortie est egalement financierement plus interessant : reduction des couts de 4 a 30 % (mediane 20 %) par reduction de la durée d'hospitalisation de huit jours en moyenne (intervalle de confiance a 5 % : cinq a 11 jours), sans augmentation significative du risque de réhospitalisation.

L'impact positif d'une sortie précoce est plus important chez les patients moderément dependants (indice de Barthel initial > 45/100) (Niveau 2 ; Grade B).

Deux elements conditionnent la réussite de ce retour au domicile :

• une visite du domicile est souvent réalisee avant la sortie (Niveau 2 ; Grade B) ;

• les effets sont plus marques lorsque l'equipe prenant en charge les patients a leur sortie est multidisciplinaire (kinesitherapeute, ergotherapeute, orthophoniste, medecin, infirmiere et assistante sociale) et assure des soins adaptes des le jour de la sortie, pendant environ trois mois et a une frequence de quatre fois par semaine au minimum.

Cette organisation est peu répandue dans notre pays mais doit etre encouragee. Le but est de proposer aux patients une sortie rapide de l'hopital et une reeducation au domicile ; le modele developpe dans le monde anglo-saxon est l' early supported discharge ou « ÉSD ». Ce modele ne correspond pas tout a fait a l'HAD tel que notre systeme de sante l'entend. Il implique l'intervention d'une equipe multidisciplinaire typiquement composee de medecins connaissant la problematique de l'AVC (MPR ou non), infirmieres, kinesitherapeutes, ergotherapeutes, orthophonistes, assistantes sociales et secretaire. Cette equipe intervient des l'hopital avec deux types d'intervention se prolongeant au domicile : soit en coordonnant la sortie de l'hopital, les soins après la sortie et la reeducation au domicile, soit en pilotant la sortie immediate laissant a une agence communautaire préexistante la prise en charge des soins de suite.

L'ÉSD contribue a réduire significativement la durée du sejour hospitalier mais est sans effet sur les rehospitalisations. Élle contribue a accroître l'autonomie du patient et a réduire les recours a l'institutionnalisation ; elle accroît la qualite du vecu du patient mais est sans effet sur l'humeur ; elle est sans effet sur les aidants.

Le benefice du systeme ÉSD semble etre pour les patients ayant un handicap moderé (Barthel initial > 45/100), quel que soit l'age.

Son intérêt economique est discute. Il n'y a pas d'arguments en faveur d'un systeme avec equipe pluridisciplinaire ayant une action essentiellement a l'hopital compare a une equipe ayant aussi une activite a l'exterieur de l'hoîpital.

A defaut d'intervention multidisciplinaire, l'intervention précoce mais durable (cinq mois) au domicile d'un(e) ergotherapeute réduit le handicap du patient après retour précoce au domicile (moins d'un mois après l'AVC) (Niveau 2, grade B).

2.8.5. Les patients a orienter vers un EHPAD

Cette orientation doit recueillir l'accord du patient dans la mesure oil il est capable d'exprimer sa volonte. Les criteres d'orientation vers un ÉHPAD sont :

• l'age avance, surtout au-dela de 80 ans (Niveau 3, grade C), mais ce n'est pas le critere principal ;

• l'isolement social soulignant l'importance du statut marital et du « support » social (Niveau 4, grade C, Consensus d'experts) ;

• la severite de l'AVC, c'est-a-dire le deficit neurologique (fonction du NIHSS et Barthel initiaux), en particulier après hemorragie cerébrale, et les troubles cognitifs qu'ils soient acquis ou préexistants (demence, depression) (Niveau 3, grade C) ;

• la persistance de troubles de la deglutition (Niveau 3, grade C) et/ou d'une incontinence (Niveau 3, grade C).

La lourdeur des soins peut justifier un placement en USLD. La prise en charge en ÉHPAD peut survenir au decours d'une hospitalisation en UNV ou service de medecine ou au decours d'un sejour en SSR specialisee pour personnes agees ; le transfert se heurte aux difficultes de disposer de la place d'hebergement dans des delais corrects.

2.9. Le maintien au domicile

L'objectif est de permettre le maintien au domicile de la personne handicapee après AVC. Les interventions pour le maintien au domicile passent d'abord par l'identification des besoins, des patients comme des aidants. Ces besoins seront le résultat de l'interrogatoire du patient et des aidants , des possibilites d'organisation des soins (suivi du medecin traitant, intervention de l'infirmier(ere), du kinesitherapeute, de l'orthophoniste) comme des aides humaines (auxiliaire de vie, aide menagere), de l'environnement materiel. Le but est de maintenir, voire d'accroître l'autonomie, d'ameliorer la qualite de vie du patient et de son entourage, tout en assurant une securite optimale au domicile. Cela passe par :

• l'education du patient et des aidants ;

• comme par l'intervention au domicile.

Les causes de l'échec de ce maintien peuvent être dues à une aggravation de l'etat du patient (affection intercurrente, perte d'autonomie), a des facteurs imprévisibles (perte du conjoint) mais aussi a l'epuisement de l'entourage.

L'intervention d'une equipe multidisciplinaire au domicile a distance de l'AVC, lorsque s'installent régression de l'autonomie et desinteret, contribuent a reduire le taux de deterioration dans les activites de la vie quotidienne et a augmenter les capacités du patient a faire des activites personnelles (Niveau 3, Grade C, Consensus d'experts). Une moins bonne QdV au domicile est associee au sexe féminin, aux douleurs dans les membres affectes, a une alimentation hachee ou par sonde, au manque d'exercice physique et a la necessité d'assistance.

Les soignants et au dela les aidants ont besoin d'information sur les techniques de transfert, l'adaptation et l'utilisation des aides techniques, la prévention des chutes et le developpement de stratégies de securité a domicile, l'amelioration des difficultés de communication, l'adaptation aux perturbations visuelles, l'adaptation aux changement emotionnels (Niveau 3, Grade C).

Une activité de conseil a domicile destinee a la famille, aux amis et aidants comprend :

• l'information a propos de l'AVC, de ses consequences, comme de l'adaptation aux sequelles ;

• l'entraînement a des activites adaptées aux desirs et besoins du patient et a son environnement familier.

Elle consiste en des visites repetées dans les trois mois suivants la sortie ce qui contribue a reduire le fardeau des aidants ; son impact est comparable a celui d'une hospitalisation de jour en medecine physique et de readaptation trois fois par semaine durant la meme periode tout en etant significative-ment moins coûteuse (Niveau 4, Grade C). Cette hospitalisation de jour peut constituer cependant un répit pour les aidants (Consensus professionnel). Des interventions globales ciblees ameliorent la santé mentale des aidants, en revanche, il est difficile de savoir exactement quel type d'intervention est le plus efficace, par quel moyen (visite, télephone, internet...), a quelle fréquence (Niveau 3, Grade C). Des intervention par groupe d'aidants et non individuelles ont eté proposees.

A defaut d'equipe multidisciplinaire structurée, l'ergotherapie a un effet positif sur les AVQ personnelles, instrumentales et la participation sociale (Niveau 1, Grade A) ; la kinesitherapie a domicile seule ne semble pas avoir d'effet significatif sur les capacités fonctionnelles du patient (Niveau 3).

2.10. Conclusion

L'orientation du patient après la phase aigue d'un AVC doit etre précoce et garantir la poursuite des soins dans des conditions favorables a sa récuperation fonctionnelle tout en contribuant a fluidifier la filtére de soin. Elle repose sur trois

piliers : L'evaluation du patient c'est-a-dire l'analyse des critères cliniques précoces et de leur evolution, l'imagerie (IRM), les PEM. Elle permet de definir la typologie du patient :

• la connaissance de la competence et des performances des structures d'accueil (typologie des structures) et par la l'orientation du patient vers la structure de soin la plus proche et la plus adaptée, sans perte de chance ;

• l'enquete portant sur l'entourage et l'environnement, assurée par l'equipe soignante, au mieux par la visite au domicile ; on doit evaluer la capacité et le desir de l'entourage, la faisabilité du retour au domicile.

Il s'agit d'une regulation dans laquelle le medecin de MPR, l'equipe soignante et l'assistant(e) social(e) jouent une part determinante des la phase initiale des soins.

Littérature grise citée

1. Circulaire DHOS/DGS/DGAS no 517 du 3 novembre 2003

2. Circulaire DHOS/DGS/DGAS no 108 du 22 mars 2007

3. Rapport sur la prise en charge précoce des accidents vasculaires cerébraux, par M. Jean-Bardet, depute. Office parlementaire dévaluation des politiques de santé. 28 septembre 2007

4. Classification internationale du fonctionnement, du handicap et de la santé (CIH2). WHO Publisher : Geneva, Switzerland. 2000: 220p

5. « Critères de prise en charge en MPR » (edition 2001, chap 13, IIe partie ; edition 2008, chap 12, IIe partie). Accessible sur www.sofmer.com

6. Decret no 2008-377 du 17 avril 2008 relatif aux conditions techniques de fonctionnement applicables a l'activité de soins de suite et de readaptation

7. Circulaire no DHOS/O1/2008/305 du 03 octobre 2008 relative aux decrets n° 2008-377 du 17 avril 2008

8. Loi no 2005-370 du 22 avril 2005 relative aux droits des malades et a la fin de vie, dite loi Leonetti.

9. Retour au domicile des patients adultes atteints d'accident vasculaire cerebral. Stratégie et organisation. Recommandations professionnelles. HAS decembre 2003.

Echelles citées

www.protocoles-urgences.fr/page5/files/scorenih.pdf Barthel index

www.afrek.com/fiches/rub1/bilanbarcomplet.pdf Charlson Co-morbidity Index

www.rdplf.org/calculateurs/pages/charlson/charlson.html Promoteurs : la Soctété francaise de medecine physique et de readaptation (Sofmer), la Soctété francaise de neurovasculaire (SFNV) et la Soctété francaise de geriatrie et gerontologie (SFGG).