Scholarly article on topic 'Diosmetin protects against ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute kidney injury in mice'

Diosmetin protects against ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute kidney injury in mice Academic research paper on "Clinical medicine"

CC BY-NC-ND
0
0
Share paper
Academic journal
Journal of Surgical Research
OECD Field of science
Keywords
{Diosmetin / "Renal I/R injury" / Inflammation / Apoptosis / "Oxidative stress"}

Abstract of research paper on Clinical medicine, author of scientific article — Kang Yang, Wei-Fang Li, Jun-Feng Yu, Cheng Yi, Wei-Feng Huang

Abstract Background Renal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced acute kidney injury remains to be a troublesome condition in clinical practice. Although the exact molecular mechanisms underlying renal I/R injury are incompletely understood, the deleterious progress of renal I/R injury involves inflammation, apoptosis, and oxidative stress. Diosmetin is a member of the flavonoid glycosides family, which suppresses the inflammatory response and cellular apoptosis and enhances antioxidant activity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective effect of diosmetin on I/R-induced renal injury in mice. Methods Thirty BALB/c mice were randomly divided into five groups. Four groups of mice received diosmetin (0.25, 0.5, and 1 mg/kg) or vehicle (I/R group) before ischemia. Another group received vehicle without ischemia to serve as a negative control (sham-operated group). Twenty-four hours after reperfusion, serum and renal tissues were harvested to evaluate renal function and histopathologic features. In addition, the expression of inflammation-related proteins, apoptotic molecules, and antioxidant enzymes was analyzed. Results Compared with sham mice, the I/R group significantly exacerbated renal function and renal tube architecture and increased the inflammatory response and renal tubule apoptosis. Nevertheless, pretreatment with diosmetin reversed these changes. In addition, diosmetin treatment resulted in a marked increase in antioxidant protein expression compared with I/R mice. Conclusions The renoprotective effects of diosmetin involved suppression of the nuclear factor-κB and mitochondrial apoptosis pathways, as well as activation of the nuclear factor erythroid 2–related factor 2/heme oxygenase-1 pathway. Diosmetin has significant potential as a therapeutic intervention to ameliorate renal injury after renal I/R.

Academic research paper on topic "Diosmetin protects against ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute kidney injury in mice"

Available online at www.sciencedirect.com

ScienceDirect

journal homepage: www.JournalofSurgicalResearch.com

Diosmetin protects against ischemia/ ^

reperfusion-induced acute kidney injury in mice

CrossMark

Kang Yang, MM,a'b Wei-Fang Li, MM,b Jun-Feng Yu, MM,a Cheng Yi, MM,a and Wei-Feng Huang, PhD

a Department of Urology, The First People's Hospital Of Yichang, China Three Gorges University, Yichang, Hubei, China

b Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Medical College, China Three Gorges University, Yichang, Hubei, China

ARTICLE INFO

ABSTRACT

Article history: Received 2 November 2016 Received in revised form 21 February 2017 Accepted 24 February 2017 Available online 6 March 2017

Keywords: Diosmetin Renal I/R injury Inflammation Apoptosis Oxidative stress

Background: Renal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced acute kidney injury remains to be a troublesome condition in clinical practice. Although the exact molecular mechanisms underlying renal I/R injury are incompletely understood, the deleterious progress of renal I/R injury involves inflammation, apoptosis, and oxidative stress. Diosmetin is a member of the flavonoid glycosides family, which suppresses the inflammatory response and cellular apoptosis and enhances antioxidant activity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective effect of diosmetin on I/R-induced renal injury in mice.

Methods: Thirty BALB/c mice were randomly divided into five groups. Four groups of mice received diosmetin (0.25, 0.5, and 1 mg/kg) or vehicle (I/R group) before ischemia. Another group received vehicle without ischemia to serve as a negative control (sham-operated group). Twenty-four hours after reperfusion, serum and renal tissues were harvested to evaluate renal function and histopathologic features. In addition, the expression of inflammation-related proteins, apoptotic molecules, and antioxidant enzymes was analyzed.

Results: Compared with sham mice, the I/R group significantly exacerbated renal function and renal tube architecture and increased the inflammatory response and renal tubule apoptosis. Nevertheless, pretreatment with diosmetin reversed these changes. In addition, diosmetin treatment resulted in a marked increase in antioxidant protein expression compared with I/R mice.

Conclusions: The renoprotective effects of diosmetin involved suppression of the nuclear factor-kB and mitochondrial apoptosis pathways, as well as activation of the nuclear factor erythroid 2—related factor 2/heme oxygenase-1 pathway. Diosmetin has significant potential as a therapeutic intervention to ameliorate renal injury after renal I/R. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

* Corresponding author. Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Medical College, China Three Gorges University, Yichang, 443002, Hubei, China. Tel.: (86717) 639 7438; fax: (86717) 639 7438. E-mail address: huangweifeng@ctgu.edu.cn (W.-F. Huang).

Introduction

Acute kidney injury (AKI) induced by renal ischemia/reperfu-sion is characterized by a sudden decline in kidney function that results in high morbidity and mortality.1 Renal ischemia/ reperfusion (I/R) injury induces a wide range of deleterious effects such as renal tissue inflammation, tubular epithelial apoptosis, and microvascular disruption.2,3 Aside from renal replacement and supportive treatments, there are no specific therapeutics available to patients.4 Therefore, a new therapeutic strategy is urgently needed to search for preserving renal impairment and functional decline after AKI.

During renal I/R, the inflammatory response stimulates a series of deleterious events that result in kidney tissue injury and renal dysfunction.5 It is well established that the nuclear factor-kB (NF-kB) signaling pathway plays a pivotal role in inflammation by modulating proinflammatory cytokine release.6 It has been reported that activation of p65 stimulates downstream genes (interleukin-1b [IL-1p], IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-a [TNF-a]), which induces leukocytes infiltration and cytokine secretion to further promote the inflammatory response.7 Activation of the NF-kB pathway increased expression of several proinflammatory cytokines, including macrophage inflammatory protein-2, IL-1b, and TNF-a, leading to exacerbation of I/R injuries in rat liver transplants.8 Moreover, the central subunit of the NF-kB signaling pathway, p65, could induce expression of apoptosis-related proteins and further exacerbate the progression of renal tubule injury and eventual cell death.9 The translocation of p65 activates caspase-3 and subsequently activates the caspase cascade, resulting in apoptosis.10 Several studies reported that inhibition of p65 could produce antiapoptosis effects through decreasing expression ofBax and caspase family-related proteins.11-13

Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a master transcriptional regulator of antioxidant proteins, is normally deactivated by interacting with the Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1-Cul3 complex (Keap-1) in the cytoplasm.14 After cellular insult, it translocates into the nucleus to promote the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), NAD(P)H quinone dehydrogenase-1 (NQO-1) and glutathione reductase, which encodes an antioxidant involved in the defense against oxidative stress.15 Many studies have shown that the NF-kB and Nrf2 pathways are tightly associated.14,16-18 Jiang et al.14 reported that Nrf2 protects against lupus nephritis by inhibiting the activation of the NF-kB pathway. After exposure to cerebral, hepatic, and gastric I/R injury, Nrf2 transactivated downstream gene expression, which in turn suppressed the proinflammatory NF-kB pathway.16,19,20

Diosmetin (3',5,7-trihydroxy-4'-methoxyflavone, Fig. 1) is extracted from the traditional Chinese herb Galium verum L. and belongs to the flavonoid family. Flavonoids function to protect blood vessel walls.21 Previous studies have demonstrated that diosmetin could be used as a treatment for several diseases such as pancreatitis,22 asthma,23 and hepatocellular carcinoma.24,25 Diosmetin has been shown to alleviate inflammatory cell infiltration and repress the NF-kB signaling pathway.22,23 In addition, the effects of diosmetin upregulate p53 and death receptor 5 to induce cellular apoptosis.25,26 Another study proved that diosmetin could ameliorate

Fig. 1 - Chemical structure of diosmetin.

oxidative stress and DNA damage in adriamycin-induced retinal injury.27 However, little is known about its renopro-tective effects during renal I/R injury.

Based on the aforementioned evidence, we hypothesized that diosmetin may protect the kidney from I/R-induced injury. The present study assessed the effects of diosmetin on murine kidneys after I/R. Moreover, the underlying mechanisms of renal function recovery and morphology were investigated.

Materials and methods

Chemical and animal

Diosmetin (analytical standard) was purchased from Sigma-Aldrich (Hong Kong, China), dissolved in 0.9% sodium chloride containing 2% dimethyl sulfoxide at a concentration of 1 mg/mL and stored at -20°C. Healthy male BALB/c mice (2025 g) were purchased from the Model Animal Research Center of China Three Gorges University (Yichang, China) and maintained in a specific pathogen-free animal facility at the Experimental Animal Center of China Three Gorges University. All mice involving this study had free access to food and water and were housed in a temperature-controlled facility with 12-h light/dark cycles.

Renal I/R injury was performed as previously described.28,29 Mice were anesthetized with pentobarbital (50 mg/kg) intraperitoneally, and the left kidney pedicle was clamped with an Atraumatic Schwartz microvessel clamp to induce acute ischemia for 45 min, whereas the right was surgically removed. After the clamp was removed, reperfusion was verified visually by restoration of color. Sham mice underwent a similar surgical procedure without clamping the left kidney pedicle. All mice were sacrificed by cervical dislocation after 24 h of reperfusion. Blood and the left kidney were collected for further analysis. The animal procedures were conducted according to the guidelines of the Institutional Animal Care and Use of China Three Gorges University. The study was approved by the animal ethics committee of Medical College of China Three Gorges University.

All animals (n = 30) used in this study were randomly allocated into five groups of six as follows: (1) sham group, (2) I/R group, (3) low-dose group: I/R + diosmetin (0.25 mg/kg), (4) moderate-dose group: I/R + diosmetin (0.5 mg/kg), and (5) highdose group: I/R + diosmetin (1 mg/kg). The drug was injected intraperitoneally 45 minbefore the induction of renal ischemia. Mice in groups 1 and 2 were injected intraperitoneally with 300 mL of saline vehicle. Diosmetin stock solution (1 mg/mL) was

yang et al • diosmetin protects against i/s-iNducid acute kidney injury in mice

diluted with saline vehicle and adjusted to a volume of 300 mL before injection into mice in groups 3-5.

Biochemical determinations

Serum was obtained from blood samples to measure blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine (Scr) by an automatic biochemistry analyzer (Hitachi 7060; Tokyo, Japan) after 24 h of reperfusion.

Kidney histology

Kidney tissues were fixed with 4% formalin for 24 h, dehydrated. and embedded in paraffin following routine protocols. Then, 4-mm-thick paraffin sections were stained with hema-toxylin and eosin and evaluated in a blind manner by a pathologist. The renal scored injury was co-evaluated by Drs J-F.Y. and C.Y. from the Department of Urology, The First People's Hospital Of Yichang, who provide expert guidance for the score calculation. Five randomly selected fields of each sample were quantitated. To guarantee random selection, the fields for each sample were selected by a freshman from the Medical College of China Three Gorges University who was able to operate the microscope. The degree of tubular injury was graded from 0 to 4 according to tubular epithelial cell swelling, interstitial expansion, and intertubular hemorrhag-ing at 200 x magnification as follows: 0, no damage; 1, <25%; 2, 25% - 50%; 3, 50% ~ 75%; and 4, >75%. Five randomly selected fields of each sample were quantitated, and the mean score was calculated.12

Immunohistochemistry

Four-micrometer sections were deparaffinized and boiled for 20 min in citrate buffer (pH = 6.0) for antigen retrieval. Endogenous peroxidases of the sections were blocked with 0.3 % hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Nonspecific adsorption was blocked by 5% bovine serum albumin in phosphate buffer saline. After incubation with the primary antibody against NF-kB p65 (Abcam, Cambridge, MA) at4°C overnight, the sections were washed and then incubated with horseradish peroxidase-conjugated antirabbit secondary antibody for 30 min at room temperature. Samples were stained with 3,3-diaminobenzidine tetrahydrochloride (DAB; Maixin Biotech, Fuzhou, China) and counterstained with

hematoxylin. Finally, the expression area of NF-kB p65 protein was photographed (Olympus, Tokyo, Japan) at 400 x magnification, and the results were analyzed by ImagePro Plus 6.0 (Media Cybernetics, Rockville, MD). The results were defined as integrated option densities/total areas.

TUNEL assay

Apoptosis was detected using a terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated digoxigenindeoxyuridine nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay (Roche Diagnostics, Mannheim, Germany) according to the manufacturer's protocol. In brief, samples were incubated in equilibration buffer for 5 min, followed by incubation in the labeling reaction reagent for 1 h at 37°C to mark DNA fragments in apoptotic cells. Cell counting was performed at 400 x magnification using five randomly selected fields, and the apoptosis index was expressed as the percentage of positive cells in the field. Data were averaged.

Western blotting

Kidney sample lysates were prepared with RIPA lysis buffer followed by centrifugation. Western blot analysis of IkBa (Santa Cruz, Dallas, TX, 1:500), Nrf2 (Santa Cruz, 1:500), HO-1 (Santa Cruz, 1:1000), NQO-1 (Santa Cruz, 1:1000), Bax (Santa Cruz, 1:1000), Bcl-2 (Santa Cruz, 1:1000), poly (ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) (Santa Cruz, 1:1000), b-actin (Abcam, Cambridge, UK, 1:10,000), Histone H3 (Santa Cruz, 1:500), p-NF-kB p65 (Cusabio, Wuhan, China, 1:500), p-IkBa (Cusabio, 1:500), NF-kB p65 (Abcam, Cambridge, UK, 1:1500), and GAPDH (Abcam, Cambridge, UK, 1:10,000) was performed according to standard protocols. The blots were detected by the Immobilon Western Chemiluminescent HRP Substrate Kit (Millipore, MA) followed by exposure to Kodak-X-Omat film (Shanghai, China).

Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction

Total RNA was extracted using TRIZOL Reagent (Invitrogen, Carlsbad, CA) and reverse transcribed with ReverTra Ace (Toyobo, Dalian, China) to produce complementary DNA. The sequences of the primers listed in Table were used for quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Real-time PCR was performed using SYBR Green-based detection in a

Table - Primers used in RT-qPCR.

Gene GenBank accession Forward primer 5'-3' Reverse primer 5'-3'

IL-1b NM_008361.4 CTGTGTAATGAAAGACGGCACA CTTGTGAGGTGCTGATGTACCA

IL-6 NM_031168.2 GCCAGAGTCCTTCAGAGAGATACA GTCCTTAGCCACTCCTTCTGTGAC

TNF-a NM_013693.3 CTGTAGCCCACGTCGTAGCA CCCTTGAAGAGAACCTGGGAGT

HO-1 NM_010442.2 CACTTCGTCAGAGGCCTGCT GCCACTGTTGCCAACAGGA

NQO-1 NM_010442.2 GGGACATGAACGTCATTCTCTG GGTCTCCTCCCAGACGGTTT

18S rRNA NR_003278 GGTCATAAGCTTGCGTTGATTAA GCTACGGAAACCTTGTTACGACTTT

RT-qPCR = real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction.

StepOnePlus (ABI, CA) according to the manufacturer's instructions. The relative messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of specific genes were normalized to 18S rRNA levels.

Statistical analysis

All data for each group were presented as the mean ± standard error. One-way analysis of variance with a Tukey-Kramer test was performed using Graphpad Prism software, version 5.0 (GraphPad Software Inc, LaJolla, CA), for multiple comparisons. Student's t-test was performed using the statistical package SPSS, version 13.0 (SPSS Inc, Chicago, IL) when two groups were compared. The value of P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant for all tests.

Results

Diosmetin protects the kidney against I/R injury

To assess diosmetin's effect on renoprotection, we detected BUN and blood creatinine (Scr) levels from serum samples. The concentrations of BUN and Scr were significantly

increased after renal I/R injury compared with the sham mice (24.44 ± 1.00 versus 5.99 ± 0.65, 135.17 ± 2.34 versus 25 ± 1.91, respectively; Fig. 2A and B). However, treatment with diosmetin before I/R injury elicited a significant dose-dependent decrease in both parameters, implying the beneficial effect of diosmetin on renal function.

Beneficial effects of diosmetin on kidney specimens were evaluated by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Compared with sham mice, the I/R group showed severe damage including extensive renal tube dilation, massive intertubular hemor-rhaging, tubular epithelial cell necrosis, and inflammatory cell infiltration. Mice treated with diosmetin before I/R injury had prominently reduced kidney injury compared with the I/R group (Fig. 2C). The tubular injury score results indicated that a high dose of diosmetin (1 mg/kg) before I/R caused significantly decreased tubular dilation and intertubular edema, from 3.67 ± 0.19 to 0.93 ± 0.3 (P < 0.05; Fig. 2D).

Diosmetin inhibits NF-kB signaling and the proinflammatory response

Activation of the NF-kB signaling pathway plays an important role in the proinflammatory response after I/R injury.30

Fig. 2 - Diosmetin improves renal function after renal I/R injury. BALB/c mice were administered diosmetin intraperitoneally (0.25 mg/kg, 0.5 mg/kg, 1 mg/kg) prior to renal I/R injury. After 24 h of reperfusion, blood and kidney samples were collected for renal function measurement and morphologic analysis. (A) BUN; (B) Scr; (C) Representative photomicrographs of tissues stained with H&E in five groups. Magnification: 200x. Bar = 100 mm. (D) Quantification of the pathologic score in each group as above. Data are presented as the mean ± SE (n = 6 mice per group).*P < 0.05 versus sham; #P < 0.05 versus I/R. H&E = hematoxylin and eosin; SE = standard error. (Color version of figure is available online.)

Fig. 3 — Diosmetin suppresses the NF-kB signaling pathway after renal I/R injury. (A) Representative images of immunohistochemical staining of p65 in kidneys from different groups. Magnification: 400 x. Bar = 100 mm. Red arrow denotes p65 staining of a nucleus. (B) Quantitative assessment of p65 expression in the kidney. (C) Western blotting showed protein levels of p65, phosphorylated-p65 (p-p65), IkBa, and phosphorylated-IkBa (p-IkBa). GAPDH was used as a loading control. (D-G) Quantification of NF-kB pathway-related proteins. (H) Real-time qPCR analysis of inflammatory cytokines following I/R. Values are expressed as the mean ± SE (n = 6 mice each group).*P < 0.05 versus sham; #P < 0.05 versus I/R. SE = standard error; qPCR = quantitative polymerase chain reaction; GAPDH = glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. (Color version of figure is available online.)

Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine whether diosmetin suppressed the expression and subcellular localization of p65 after I/R. The results showed that p65 expression was markedly increased after 24 h of reperfusion. However, p65 expression showed a dose-dependent decrease in the pre-treatment groups (Fig. 3A and B). Moreover, p65 nuclear staining indicated that p65 was translocated into the nucleus in response to I/R injury (Fig. 3A). To further explore the NF-kB pathway, p65, phosphorylated-p65, IkBa, and phosphorylated-IkBa were examined by Western blotting (Fig. 3C). I/R increased the protein levels of p65, p-p65, and p-IkBa and decreased the expression of IkBa compared with sham mice, whereas diosmetin reversed these trends (Fig. 3D-G). In addition, to test whether diosmetin suppressed expression of downstream inflammatory cytokines, real-time PCR (RT-PCR) was used to detect the expression of IL-1b, IL-6 and TNF-a in five groups (Fig. 3H). Interestingly, diosmetin did produce markedly change with a significantly dose-dependent decrease in these inflammation mediators when compared with I/R injury mice. Together, these results suggest that diosmetin might be capable of protecting the kidneys from I/R induced injury, in

part through inhibiting the NF-kB signaling pathway and attenuating the inflammatory response.

Diosmetin alleviates apoptosis after renal I/R injury

To determine whether diosmetin reduced renal cell apoptosis after I/R injury, a TUNEL assay was used to identify apoptotic cells (Fig. 4A). In the I/R group, an increase in TUNEL-positive cells was observed compared with the sham group, whereas preconditioning with 1 mg/kg diosmetin resulted in a significant reduction in the number of apoptotic cells (5.14 ± 3.33 % versus 60.77 ± 13.52 %, P < 0.05; Fig. 4B). To further explore the potential mechanisms of apoptosis, we performed with Western blotting to test protein expression levels of PARP-1, cleaved caspase 3, Bcl-2, and Bax (Fig. 4C). The results indicated that I/R resulted in significant upregulation of PARP-1 and cleaved caspase 3 expression and downregulation of the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax compared with the sham group. In contrast, preconditioning with diosmetin reversed these changes in a dose-dependent manner (Fig. 4D-F), indicating that diosmetin

Fig. 4 - Diosmetin attenuates I/R-induced apoptosis. (A) Representative photomicrographs of TUNEL staining taken from five different treatments after 24 h of reperfusion. Magnification: 400 x. Bar = 100 mm. TUNEL-positive cells are stained brown (red arrow). (B) TUNEL-positive cells were quantitatively analyzed and expressed as a percentage of positive cells in the high-power field. (C) Western blot bands displayed apoptotic-related protein expression of PARP-1, cleaved-caspase 3, Bcl-2, and Bax in five groups. (D-F) Representative quantitative analysis of apoptotic protein levels (n = 6 mice per group). Data are presented as the mean ± SE.*P < 0.05 uersus sham; #P < 0.05 versus I/R. SE = standard error. (Color version of figure is available online.)

could have a potential effect on ameliorating I/R-induced cellular apoptosis through suppression of the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway.

Diosmetin prevents renal oxidative stress and activates the Nrf2 signaling pathway after I/R injury

Renal malondialdehyde levels were examined to evaluate the antioxidant effect of diosmetin. The results showed that renal malondialdehyde was significantly increased in the I/R group when compared with the sham group (1.92 ± 0.13 versus 8.02 ± 0.68 nm/mg protein, *P < 0.05, Fig. 5A). However, there were significant decreases in the I/R + 0.25 mg/kg diosmetin, I/ R + 0.5 mg/kg diosmetin, and I/R + 1 mg/kg diosmetin groups when compared with the I/R group (5.54 ± 0.43, 4.06 ± 0.54, and 2.28 ± 0.41 nm/mg protein, #P < 0.05). Because Nrf2 plays an important role in regulating the antioxidant response,31 Western blotting was performed to identify the effect of dio-smetin on nuclear expression levels of Nrf2 and downstream proteins HO-1 and NQO-1 (Fig. 5B). Compared with the sham group, I/R injury mice experienced an increase in Nrf2, HO-1 and NQO-1 expression. In addition, preconditioning with diosmetin significantly augmented the expression of these proteins (Fig. 5C-E). Interestingly, similar results were observed in the mRNA levels of HO-1 and NQO-1 genes, respectively (Fig. 5F and G), which implied that the Nrf2/HO-1 signaling pathway was activated by diosmetin.

Discussion

Renal I/R injury is a difficult and complex clinical problem. Due to limited treatment options for patients, renal I/R injury has adverse outcomes that increase the risk of mortality.1 It has been reported that renal I/R injury was a predominant

cause of AKI, resulting in renal tubule dilation, inflammatory insult, apoptotic cell death, and ultimately renal failure.32 Thus, looking for new pharmacologic agents is an essential tactic to preclude renal I/R injury.

Diosmetin has been reported to exhibit beneficial effects on diverse experimental models through its suppression of inflammation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis.22,27 Yu et al.22 reported that the protective effects of diosmetin could suppress the translocation of p65, reduce the release of proinflammatory cytokines, and impair the severity of cerulein-induced acute pacreatitis biochemically and morphologically. The properties of antioxidative stress have been shown to decrease the levels of reactive oxidant species and glutathione.27 Another study showed that diosmetin could decrease cell death in the thymus via suppression of Fas/FasL-dependent pathways.21 Nevertheless, how dio-smetin benefits the kidney has not been reported previously.

In the present study, three doses (0.25, 0.5, and 1 mg/kg) of diosmetin were used to determine its effect on renal I/R injury. Renal morphologic structures displayed tubular hemorrhag-ing, epithelial cell cataplasia and necrosis from I/R mice, suggesting that renal I/R could result in the destruction of renal tissues. The data showed that diosmetin prevents this destruction in a dose-dependent manner; however, further beneficial effects were not shown with increasing concentrations. We then explored the potential mechanisms of dio-smetin protection against renal I/R injury. The results showed that diosmetin alleviated inflammatory response, cellular apoptosis, and promoted potential capacity of antioxidative stress with preconditioning. The underlying mechanisms of renoprotection are mainly due to the repression of NF-kB and apoptosis signaling, as well as activation of Nrf2/HO-1 signaling.

It is well known that members of the NF-kB family play an important role in regulating inflammation.33 The crucial

Fig. 5 — Diosmetin upregulates the Nrf2 signaling pathway—induced by I/R injury. (A) Representative MDA levels of kidneys from different groups. (B) Representative Western blots of Nrf2 in the nucleus, and HO-1 and NQO-1 in the kidneys. Histone and p-actin served as loading controls, respectively. (C-E) Quantitative analysis of the expressive levels of Nrf2, HO-1, and NQO-1. (F, G) Expression levels of HO-1 and NQO-1 were evaluated by RT-qPCR after I/R injury. Data are presented as the mean ± SE (n = 6 mice per group).*P < 0.05 versus sham; #P < 0.05 versus I/R. MDA = malondialdehyde; SE = standard error.

subunit p65 of the NF-kB pathway is normally deactivated in the cytoplasm by integration with IkBs. During renal I/R injury, IkBs is phosphorylated and triggers ubiquitin-dependent IkBa degradation, allowing for p65 translocation into the nucleus to upregulate proinflammation-related mediators.30 Consistent with previous studies,22,23 the expression of p-IkBa, p65, and p-p65 was elevated and IkBa levels were reduced in the I/R mice. Similarly, ischemia increased the mRNA expression levels of NF-kB pathway-targeted genes, including IL-1b, IL-6, and TNF-a. Nevertheless, preadministration with diosmetin effectively reversed these changes, demonstrating that activation of the NF-kB pathway correlated with renal I/R injury in mice. Diosmetin had a renoprotective effect through suppression of the NF-kB pathway.

Inflammation is also an important contributor to the progression of cellular apoptosis.34 The translocation of p65 into the nucleus upregulates TNF-a expression, a proapoptotic gene, which causes tubular endothelial cell death through caspase-3.35 Activated caspase-3 facilitates PARP-1 expression, which can be involved in the recovery of DNA damage. However, excessive PARP-1 activation can result in cell death by depletion of intracellular adenosine triphosphate in tubular cells.36,37 At the cellular level, diosmetin antagonized the damage of the mitochondrial membrane and protected retinal injury from mitochondrial-associated apoptosis.27 Likewise, data from our present study showed that the expression of TNF-a, cleaved caspase 3, and PARP-1 were markedly increased in the I/R group. However, diosmetin reversed these trends (Figs. 3H and 4), suggesting the effect of antiapoptosis via reducing the mRNA expression levels of TNF-a, subsequently preventing mitochondrial apoptotic pathway regulated by members of the Bcl-2 protein family and then downregulating the downstream protein levels of cleaved capspase 3 and PARP-1.

However, other studies have shown contrary results. Liu et al.25 reported that diosmetin was capable of promoting expression of p53 and increasing the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax proteins, leading to hepatocellular carcinoma apoptosis in vitro. Similar results were observed in renal cell carcinoma.26 We provided evidence that diosmetin resulted in antiapoptotic effects in an animal model, with less renal tubule injury and a decreased Bcl-2/Bax ratio. Likewise, Shen et al.27 demonstrated that diosmetin reduced the expression of Bcl-2/Bax. It is well established that p53 negatively regulates proapoptosis by inhibiting the cell cycle to suppress tumor growth.38 Obviously, p53 is extensively activated in response to strong stress such as oncogenic progression, participating in accelerating tumor cell death through activating mitochondrial apoptotic proteins. By contrast, p53 is slightly activated in response to low stressors, such as I/R, to provide restored function to the injury.39 Furthermore, since mitochondrial apoptotic pathway plays an important role in the apoptotic progression of renal I/R injury,40,41 we speculated that the renoprotection of diosmetin might be via inhibiting of mito-chondrial apoptotic pathway. Indeed, diosmetin increased the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax after renal I/R and decreased cleaved caspase-3 and PARP-1. Nevertheless, our experiment was performed with mouse model, and a study about the exact mechanism is needed to further research.

Nrf2, a redox-sensitive transcription factor, is responsible for upregulating target genes encoding phase II detoxifying enzymes and antioxidants that maintain cellular redox ho-meostasis.14 Crosstalk of the NF-kB and Nrf2/HO-1 pathways has been comprehensively researched. Li et al.42 indicated that activation of the Nrf2 antioxidant pathway resulted in the reduction of NF-kB-mediated inflammation. Jiang et al.14 reported that knockdown of Nrf2 expression stimulated the NF-kB-mediated inflammatory response compared with normal mouse models of lupus nephritis. Several chemicals were shown to be beneficial by elevating the Nrf2 protein level and repressing the expression of NF-kB and downstream cytokines.16,18,43 Consistent with previous research, I/R in murine kidneys led to increased Nrf2 accumulation in the nucleus, concomitant with elevation of its downstream target genes HO-1 and NQO-1 at the mRNA and protein levels. Diosmetin augmented these trends dramatically with preconditioning. Accordingly, the results from our study demonstrate the potential renoprotective mechanism of diosmetin through Nrf2/ HO-1 pathway activation and suppression of NF-kB signaling.

Fig. 6 - Proposed scheme for the balance between NF-kB and Nrf2 and the protective effect of diosmetin on I/R-induced acute renal injury. On the one hand, diosmetin prevents NF-kB activation, reduces inflammatory gene expression, and subsequently blocks the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Then, diosmetin inhibits the downstream proteins cleaved caspase 3 and PARP-1. On the other hand, diosmetin increases the accumulation of Nrf2 in the nucleus and promotes its downstream target gene expression and eventually enhancing antioxidant activity. (Color version of figure is available online.)

Inflammation and oxidative stress are two major components involved in the pathogenesis and progression of AKI. NF-kB and Nrf2 are the crucial transcription factors that regulate cellular responses to inflammation and oxidative stress, respectively, after AKI. Nrf2 activation can reduce NF-kB activity, resulting in decreased cytokine production, whereas NF-kB can modulate Nrf2 transcription and activity, having both positive and negative effects on Nrf2 target gene expression. There is a delicate balance between inflammation-induced cellular apoptosis and enhanced anti-oxidant defense capacity mediated by Nrf2 in this process. Diosmetin tips the balance in favor of recovering from I/R-induced acute renal injury by suppressing the NF-kB pathway and boosting the Nrf2/HO-1 axis (Fig. 6).

Overall, this study demonstrates that diosmetin can protect mice against renal I/R injury by suppressing inflammation and apoptosis and enhancing antioxidant capabilities. The mechanisms of renoprotection are linked with suppression of NF-kB and the mitochondrial pathways associated with Nrf2/ HO-1 signaling. Our results suggest that diosmetin may be a promising therapeutic for preventing renal I/R injury.

Acknowledgment

This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China, No. 81100281, and the Hubei Province health and family planning scientific research project, No. WJ2015XB018.

Authors' contributions: W-F.H. obtained the funding. W-F.H. and K.Y. contributed to the conception and/or design of this study. K.Y. and W-F.L. conducted the experiments. K.Y., W-F.L., J-F.Y., and C.Y. performed the data analysis. K.Y. and W-F.H. wrote and/or revised the article. K.Y., W-F.L., J-F.Y., C.Y., and W-F.H. contributed to final approval of the article.

Disclosure

The authors reported no proprietary or commercial interest in any product mentioned or concept discussed in this article.

REFERENCES

1. Lameire NH, Bagga A, Cruz D, et al. Acute kidney injury: an increasing global concern. Lancet. 2013;382:170—179.

2. Murugan R, Kellum JA. Acute kidney injury: what's the prognosis? Nat Reu Nephrol. 2011;7:209—217.

3. Andreucci M, Faga T, Pisani A, et al. Acute kidney injury by radiographic contrast media: pathogenesis and prevention. Biomed Res Int. 2014;2014:362725.

4. Bellomo R, Kellum JA, Ronco C. Acute kidney injury. Lancet. 2012;380:756—766.

5. Bonventre JV, Yang L. Cellular pathophysiology of ischemic acute kidney injury. J Clin Invest. 2011;121:4210—4221.

6. Tak PP, Firestein GS. NF-kappaB: a key role in inflammatory diseases. J Clin Invest. 2001;107:7—11.

7. Kanagasundaram NS. Pathophysiology of ischaemic acute kidney injury. Ann Clin Biochem. 2015;52:193—205.

8. Ramachandran S, Liaw JM, Jia J, et al. Ischemia-reperfusion injury in rat steatotic liver is dependent on NFkappaB P65 activation. Transpl Immunol. 2012;26:201-206.

9. Ghosh S, Hayden MS. New regulators of NF-kappaB in inflammation. Nat Reu Immunol. 2008;8:837-848.

10. Martinon F, Holler N, Richard C, et al. Activation of a pro-apoptotic amplification loop through inhibition of NF-kB-dependent survival signals by caspase-mediated inactivation of RIP. FEBS Lett. 2000;468:134-136.

11. Lin M, Li L, Li L, et al. The protective effect of baicalin against renal ischemia-reperfusion injury through inhibition of inflammation and apoptosis. BMC Complement Altern Med. 2014;14:19.

12. Ka SO, Hwang HP, Jang JH, et al. The protein kinase 2 inhibitor tetrabromobenzotriazole protects against renal ischemia reperfusion injury. Sci Rep. 2015;5:14816.

13. Guo SX, Fang Q, You CG, et al. Effects of hydrogen-rich saline on early acute kidney injury in severely burned rats by suppressing oxidative stress induced apoptosis and inflammation. J Transl Med. 2015;13:183.

14. Jiang T, Tian F, Zheng H, et al. Nrf2 suppresses lupus nephritis through inhibition of oxidative injury and the NF-kappaB-mediated inflammatory response. Kidney Int. 2014;85:333-343.

15. Shelton LM, Park BK, Copple IM. Role of Nrf2 in protection against acute kidney injury. Kidney Int. 2013;84:1090-1095.

16. Mahmoud-Awny M, Attia AS, Abd-Ellah MF, et al. Mangiferin mitigates gastric ulcer in ischemia/reperfused rats: involvement of PPAR-gamma, NF-kappaB and Nrf2/HO-1 signaling pathways. PLoS One. 2015;10:e0132497.

17. Li W, Suwanwela NC, Patumraj S. Curcumin by down-regulating NF-kB and elevating Nrf2, reduces brain edema and neurological dysfunction after cerebral I/R. Microuasc Res. 2016;106:117-127.

18. Farias JG, Carrasco-Pozo C, Carrasco Loza R, et al. Polyunsaturated fatty acid induces cardioprotection against ischemia-reperfusion through the inhibition of NF-kappaB and induction of Nrf2. Exp Biol Med (Maywood). 2016:1-11.

19. Hua K, Sheng X, Li TT, et al. The edaravone and 3-n-butylphthalide ring-opening derivative 10b effectively attenuates cerebral ischemia injury in rats. Acta Pharmacol Sin. 2015;36:917-927.

20. Rao J, Qian X, Li G, et al. ATF3-mediated NRF2/HO-1 signaling regulates TLR4 innate immune responses in mouse liver ischemia/reperfusion injury. Am J Transplant. 2015;15:76-87.

21. Zhao R, Chen Z, Jia G, et al. Protective effects of diosmetin extracted from Galium verum L. on the thymus of U14-bearing mice. Can J Physiol Pharmacol. 2011;89:665-673.

22. Yu G, Wan R, Yin G, et al. Diosmetin ameliorates the severity of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice by inhibiting the activation of the nuclear factor-kappaB. Int J Clin Exp Pathol. 2014;7:2133-2142.

23. Ge A, Liu Y, Zeng X, et al. Effect of diosmetin on airway remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma. Acta Biochim Biophys Sin (Shanghai). 2015;47:604-611.

24. Liu J, Wen X, Liu B, et al. Diosmetin inhibits the metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma cells by downregulating the expression levels of MMP2 and MMP9. Mol Med Rep. 2016;13:2401-2408.

25. Liu B, Shi Y, Peng W, et al. Diosmetin induces apoptosis by upregulating p53 via the TGF-beta signal pathway in HepG2 hepatoma cells. Mol Med Rep. 2016;14:159-164.

26. Ren Y, Yao X, Wang X, et al. MP85-12 diosmetin enhances trail-induced apoptosis in renal carcinoma cells through the up-regulation of death receptor 5. J Urol. 2016;195:e1102.

27. Shen Z, Shao J, Dai J, et al. Diosmetin protects against retinal injury via reduction of DNA damage and oxidative stress. Toxicol Rep. 2016;3:78-86.

28. Kim M, Kim M, Kim N, et al. Isoflurane mediates protection from renal ischemia-reperfusion injury via sphingosine kinase and sphingosine-1-phosphate-dependent pathways. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol. 2007;293:F1827-F1835.

29. Ham A, Rabadi M, Kim M, et al. Peptidyl arginine deiminase-4 activation exacerbates kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol. 2014;307:F1052-F1062.

30. Kusch A, Hoff U, Bubalo G, et al. Novel signalling mechanisms and targets in renal ischaemia and reperfusion injury. Acta Physiol (Oxf). 2013;208:25-40.

31. Liu M, Grigoryev DN, Crow MT, et al. Transcription factor Nrf2 is protective during ischemic and nephrotoxic acute kidney injury in mice. Kidney Int. 2009;76:277-285.

32. El Sabbahy M, Vaidya VS. Ischemic kidney injury and mechanisms of tissue repair. Wiley Interdiscip Reu Syst Biol Med. 2011;3:606-618.

33. Vallabhapurapu S, Karin M. Regulation and function of NF-kappaB transcription factors in the immune system. Annu Reu Immunol. 2009;27:693-733.

34. Lee HT, Gallos G, Nasr SH, et al. A1 adenosine receptor activation inhibits inflammation, necrosis, and apoptosis after renal ischemia-reperfusion injury in mice. J Am Soc Nephrol. 2004;15:102-111.

35. Li J, Hong Z, Liu H, et al. Hydrogen-rich saline promotes the recovery of renal function after ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats via anti-apoptosis and anti-inflammation. Front Pharmacol. 2016;7:106.

36. Skaper SD. Poly(ADP-Ribose) polymerase-1 in acute neuronal death and inflammation: a strategy for neuroprotection. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2003;993:217-228. discussion 287-218.

37. Thiemermann C, Bowes J, Myint FP, et al. Inhibition of the activity of poly(ADP ribose) synthetase reduces ischemia-reperfusion injury in the heart and skeletal muscle. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 1997;94:679-683.

38. Liao JM, Cao B, Deng J, et al. TFIIS.h, a new target of p53, regulates transcription efficiency of pro-apoptotic bax gene. Sci Rep. 2016;6:23542.

39. Vousden KH, Lane DP. p53 in health and disease. Nat Reu Mol Cell Biol. 2007;8:275-283.

40. Castaneda MP, Swiatecka-Urban A, Mitsnefes MM, et al. Activation of mitochondrial apoptotic pathways in human renal allografts after ischemiareperfusion injury. Transplantation. 2003;76:50-54.

41. Supavekin S, Zhang W, Kucherlapati R, et al. Differential gene expression following early renal ischemia/reperfusion. Kidney Int. 2003;63:1714-1724.

42. Li W, Khor TO, Xu C, et al. Activation of Nrf2-antioxidant signaling attenuates NFkappaB-inflammatory response and elicits apoptosis. Biochem Pharmacol. 2008;76:1485-1489.

43. Sriram N, Kalayarasan S, Sudhandiran G. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate augments antioxidant activities and inhibits inflammation during bleomycin-induced experimental pulmonary fibrosis through Nrf2-Keap1 signaling. Pulm Pharmacol Ther. 2009;22:221-236.