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Academic research paper on topic "Lower Cortisol Activity is Associated with First-Time Driving while Impaired"

PROJECT MUSE"

The Circle Dance of Time

Dunne, John S.

Published by University of Notre Dame Press

Dunne, John S.

The Circle Dance ofTime.

Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press, 2010. ProjectMUSE. Web. 30 Mar. 2015http://muse.jhu.edu/.

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http://muse.jhu.edu/books/9780268077716

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Preface

1. The last words of the ghost of Darius in a new version of Aeschylus' The Persians by Ellen McLaughlin which I saw performed by the Aurora Theatre Company in Berkeley on October 15, 2004.

2. The first and last lines of "East Coker" in T. S. Eliot, Four Quartets (San Diego, New York, London: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1988), pp. 23 and 32.

3. T. E. Lawrence, Seven Pillars of Wisdom (Harmondsworth, England: Penguin and Jonathan Cape, 1971), p. 364. See my discussion in my Reasons of the Heart (New York: Macmillan, 1978; pbk. Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press, 1979), p. 1.

4. Plotinus, Enneads 6:9 in A. H. Armstrong, ed. and trans., Plotinus, vol. 7 (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1988), pp. 333 and 335. See my discussion in my Music of Time (Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press, 1996),

p. 159.

5. Dag Hammarskjöld, "A Room of Quiet: The United Nations Meditation Room" (New York: United Nations, 1971), opening sentence.

6. Patricia McKillip, The Sorceress and the Cygnet (New York: Ace, 1991), p. 92. See discussion below in the chapter "The Far Point on the Circle: Love Passing through Loneliness."

7. Pascal, Pensees (#278 in ed. Brunschvicg) in Pascal, Oeuvres Completes, ed. Jacques Chevalier (Paris: Gallimard, 1954), p. 1222. Quoted below in the chapter "God Sensible to the Heart," n. 1.

8. Nicolas Malebranche, Oeuvres, ed. Genevieve Rodis-Lewis and Germain Malbreil (Paris: Gallimard, 1979), vol. 1, p. 1132 (my trans.). Quoted below, "God Sensible to the Heart," n. 39.

9. T. S. Eliot, Four Quartets, p. 28 ("East Coker," lines 123-128).

10. Pascal, Pensees (#206 in ed. Brunschvicg) in Pascal, Oeuvres Completes, p. 1113 (my trans.). The saying about the infinite spaces "I do not know and that do not know me" is #205 in ed. Brunschvicg.

11. Saint Augustine, Confessions, trans. Henry Chadwick (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991), p. 3 (bk. 1, chap. 1).

12. Werner Herzog, "Every man for himself and God against all" in his Screenplays, trans. Alan Greenberg and Martje Herzog (New York: Tanam, 1980), pp. 97 and 172.

13. Dag Hammarskjöld, Markings, trans. Leif Sjöberg and W. H. Auden (New York: Knopf, 1964), p. 89.

Reasons of the Heart

1. "Le coeur a ses raisons, que la raison ne connait point." Pascal, Pensees (#277 in ed. Brunschvicg), Oeuvres Completes, p. 1221.

2. Karl Barth, Anselm: Fides Quaerens Intellectum (Faith in Search of Understanding), trans. Ian W. Robertson (Cleveland and New York: World/Meridian, 1962).

3. Bernard Lonergan, Insight (London: Longmans, 1957).

4. Helen Luke, "Choice in the Lord of the Rings" (Three Rivers, Mich.: Apple Farm Paper, n.d.), p. 12, an unpublished essay she gave me permission to use.

5. Dag Hammarskjöld, "A Room of Quiet."

6. Pascal, Pensees (#281 in ed. Brunschvicg), Oeuvres Completes, p. 1221.

7. Ibid. (#278), p. 1222.

8. "Tout le malheur des hommes vient d'une seule chose, qui est de ne savoir pas demeurer en repos dans une chambre," Pascal, Pensees (#139), pp. 1138-1139.

9. Thomas R. Kelly, A Testament of Devotion (New York: Harper & Row, 1941), p. 40.

10. Bruce Chatwin, The Songlines (New York: Penguin, 1987), pp. 161-162 (his critique of Pascal). The words he is quoting here, as he says, are those of Dostoevsky's Grand Inquisitor.

11. Newman, Prose and Poetry, ed. George N. Shuster (New York: Allyn & Bacon, 1925), p. 116.

12. Arthur Zajonc, Catching the Light (New York: Oxford University Press, 1993).

13. The Notebooks of Joseph Joubert, ed. and trans. Paul Auster (San Francisco: North Point, 1983), p. 180 (Joubert's entries for October 22 and 24, 1821, quoted by Maurice Blanchot in a commentary at the end of the volume).

14. Ibid., pp. 180-181.

15. Wendell Berry, A World Lost (Washington, D.C.: Counterpoint, 1996), p. 150.

16. J. R. R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings (one vol. ed.) (London: Allen & Unwin, 1976), p. 397.

17. Matthew 5:8 (KJ).

18. S0ren Kierkegaard, Purity of Heart Is to Will One Thing, trans. Douglas V. Steere (New York: Harper & Row, 1956).

19. Dante, Paradiso 3:85 in E. Moore and Paget Toynbee, Le Opere di Dante Alighieri (Oxford: Oxford University Press,

1963), p. 107.

20. Antoine de Saint Exupéry, The Little Prince, trans. Katherine Woods (San Diego: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1971), p. 87.

21. Dag Hammarskjöld, Markings, p. 89.

22. Gabriel Marcel, Being and Having, trans. Katherine Farrer (New York: Harper & Row, 1965), p. 167.

23. The story is recounted by Jung in his autobiography, Memories, Dreams, Reflections, ed. Aniela Jaffe and trans. Richard and Clara Winston (New York: Random House/Vintage, 1963), p. 355.

24. The Soliloquies of Saint Augustine (Latin and English), ed. and trans. Thomas F. Gilligan (New York: Cosmopolitan Science and Art Service Co., 1943), p. 70 (Latin) and p. 71 (English). I have modified the translation a little.

25. S0ren Kierkegaard, Fear and Trembling, trans. Alastair Hannay (New York: Penguin, 1988), p. 49.

26. Genesis 5:24 (RSV).

27. Michael Polanyi, The Tacit Dimension (Gloucester, Mass.: Peter Smith, 1983), p. 4.

28. John 17:23 (RSV).

29. John 6:68 (RSV).

30. See my discussion of these formulas in Peace of the Present (Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press, 1991), pp. 99-101.

31. John 20:17 (RSV).

32. Saint Augustine, Confessions, p. 3 (bk. 1, chap. 1).

33. Leo Bersani and Ulysse Dutoit, The Forms of Violence (New York: Schocken, 1985), pp. 110-125.

34. "Le silence eternel de ces espaces infinis m'effraie," Pascal, Pensees (#206 in ed. Brunschvicg), p. 1113.

35. Matthew 1:23 (RSV).

36. Isak Dinesen (Karen Blixen), Last Tales (New York: Random/Vintage, 1975), p. 100.

37. King of Hearts (Alan Bates, Genevieve Bujold, Jean Claude Brialy, Micheline Presle, Michel Serrault, Pierre Brasseur, Francoise Christophe, Julien Guiomar, Palau), directed by Philippe de Broca, screenplay and dialogue by Daniel Boulanger, music by Georges Delerue (1967 Fidebroc S.A.R.L.) (2001, MGM Home Entertainment Inc.).

38. John 18:36 (KJ).

39. Ephesians 3:17 (KJ).

40. Martin Buber, Ecstatic Confessions, ed. Paul Mendes-Flohr, trans. Esther Cameron (San Francisco: Harper & Row, 1985), p. 11.

41. The Upanishads, trans. Juan Mascaro (New York: Penguin, 1965), pp. 45 and 132 (Brihad-aranyaka Upanishad). See my discussion in The Way of All the Earth (Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press, 1978), pp. 193 and 228.

42. The Upanishads (Mascaro), pp. 117-118 (Chandogya Upanishad). See my discussion in The Way of All the Earth, p. 219.

43. See my discussion of this sentence in Peace of the Present, p. 101.

44. Saint Thomas Aquinas, Summa Theologiae (one vol. ed.) (Rome: Editiones Paulinae, 1962), p. 12 (I, q. 2, a. 1), my translation.

45. Martin Buber, I and Thou, trans. Ronald Gregor Smith (New York: Scribner's, 1958), pp. 66-67.

46. John 1:12 (RSV).

47. John 14:23 (RSV).

48. Buber, I and Thou, p. 67.

49. See my Peace of the Present, pp. 93-95 (a conversation with David Daube).

50. Buber, I and Thou, p. 67.

51. See my Peace of the Present, pp. 94-95.

52. John 17:23 and John 1:14 (RSV).

53. The Upanishads (Mascaro), pp. 83-84 (Mandukya Upa-nishad) and pp. 134-138 (Brihad-aranyaka Upanishad).

54. See my Love's Mind (Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press, 1993), p. 125.

55. Nicholas of Cusa, The Vision of God, trans. Emma Gur-ney Salter (New York: Ungar, 1960).

56. Or "by what means can one perceive the perceiver?" in The Upanishads, trans. Patrick Olivelle (New York: Oxford University Press, 1996), p. 30.

57. Ira Progroff, trans. and commentary, The Cloud of Unknowing (New York: Dell, 1957), p. 37.

58. See my discussion of this saying of Al-Alawi in The Homing Spirit (New York: Crossroad, 1987; rpt. Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press, 1997), p. 76.

59. The Upanishads (Mascaro), p. 83 (Mandukya Upani-shad).

60. Ibid., p. 35 (from Taittiriya Upanishad).

61. John 10:30 (KJ). RSV has "I and the Father are one."

62. Buber, I and Thou, p. 84.

63. See my discussion of "Only God enters into the soul" in my Reasons of the Heart, pp. 57-58.

64. See the texts of Saint Augustine collected under the title "Crede ut intelligas" by Franciscus Moriones in his Enchiridion Theologicum Sancti Augustini (Madrid: Editorial Catolica, 1961), pp. 14-19.

God Sensible to the Heart

1. "C'est le coeur qui sent Dieu, et non la raison. Voila ce que c'est que la foi: Dieu sensible au coeur, non a la raison." Pascal, Pensees (#278 in ed. Brunschvicg) in Pascal, Oeuvres Completes, p. 1222.

2. J. R. R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings (one vol. ed.) (London: Allen & Unwin, 1976), p. 76.

3. Martin Buber, Good and Evil, trans. Ronald Gregor Smith (New York: Scribner's, 1953), p. 43.

4. Ibid., p. 47.

5. Buber, I and Thou, pp. 6 and 101 (the eternal thou in the human thou) and p. 63 (the breath of eternal life).

6. Buber, The Way of Response, ed. N. N. Glatzer (New York: Schocken, 1966), p. 99. See my discussion in Reasons of the Heart, p. 123.

7. Ludwig Wittgenstein, Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus, trans. D. F. Pears and B. F. McGuinness (London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1963), p. 147 (#6.4311).

8. Buber, The Way of Man (Secaucus, N.J.: Citadel Press, 1966), chapter titles.

9. T. S. Eliot, Four Quartets, pp. 23 and 32 (first and last lines of "East Coker").

10. Isak Dinesen quoted above in the first chapter, n. 36.

11. C. G. Jung, Answer to Job, trans. R. F. C. Hull (New York: Meridian, 1960).

12. Buber, I and Thou, pp. 66-67.

13. Nikos Kazantzakis, Zorba the Greek, trans. Carl Wild-man (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1952), p. 105.

14. Buber, I and Thou, pp. 66-67.

15. Galatians 2:20 (KJ).

16. Jung, Memories, Dreams, Reflections, p. 280.

17. Polanyi quoted above in the first chapter, n. 27.

18. Max Gorky, Reminiscences of Tolstoy, Chekhov and An-dreev, trans. Katherine Mansfield, S. S. Koteliansky, and Leonard Woolf (London: Hogarth, 1948), p. 23.

19. Stephen Leacock, Nonsense Novels (New York: Dodd, Mead, 1943), p. 60 (this novel is Gertrude the Governess).

20. G. K. Chesterton, Saint Thomas Aquinas (New York: Doubleday/Image, 1956), pp. 120-143.

21. T. E. Lawrence, Seven Pillars of Wisdom, p. 364. See my discussion in my Reasons of the Heart, p. 1.

22. Wendell Berry, The Wheel (San Francisco: North Point, 1982), p. 26 (opening line of poem "Setting Out").

23. Saint John of the Cross, Dark Night of the Soul, trans. E. Allison Peers (New York: Doubleday/Image, 1990), p. 34.

24. Ibid.

25. Martin Heidegger, The Concept of Time, trans. William McNeill, English-German edition (Oxford: Blackwell, 1992), p. 12E.

26. Heidegger, Discourse on Thinking, a translation of Gelassenheit by John M. Anderson and E. Hans Freund (New York: Harper & Row, 1966), p. 55.

27. 2 Samuel 6:14 (RSV).

28. Bruce Chatwin, The Songlines, p. 176. Cf. Giambattista Vico, New Science, trans. David Marsh (New York: Penguin,

1999), p. 96.

29. Einstein quoted by Abraham Pais in his Einstein biography, "Subtle is the Lord..." (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1982), p. 468.

30. Tolkien, Lord of the Rings, p. 93.

31. Murray Cox and Alice Theilgaard, Mutative Metaphors in Psychotherapy (London and New York: Tavistock, 1987), p. x.

32. See my discussion in Reading the Gospel (Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press, 2000), p. 23. Both Tolkien and C. S. Lewis have the world created by song or by the Word as song.

33. This is the title of Salieri's comic opera written in competition with Mozart. See my discussion in Love's Mind, pp. 31 and 111.

34. Canticum est exultatio mentis de aeternis habita prorumpens in vocem. This sentence occurs in Saint Thomas's preface to his commentary on the Psalms. See my discussion in The Road of the Heart's Desire (Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press, 2002), p. 87.

35. Oliver Wendell Holmes, "The Voiceless" in Poetical Works, vol. 1 (Boston and New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1896),

p. 247.

36. George Bernard Shaw, Back to Methuselah (New York: Brentano's, 1929), p. 9. These words are the epigraph of Padraic Colum's fine little essay Storytelling New and Old (New York: Macmillan, 1968).

37. Bernard Lonergan, Insight (London: Longmans Green,

1957).

38. I put this first in my "Songlines of the Gospel" in Reading the Gospel, p. 143, and then as the epigraph of my A Journey with God in Time (Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press, 2003).

39. Nicolas Malebranche, Oeuvres, ed. Genevieve Rodis-Lewis and Germain Malbreil (Paris: Gallimard, 1979), vol. 1, p. 1132 (my translation). See my discussion in Love's Mind, pp. 86-87, and in Reading the Gospel, pp. 7 and 11.

40. Mary Stewart, Merlin Trilogy (New York: William Morrow, 1980), p. 436.

41. Genesis 5:24 (RSV).

42. George Steiner, Martin Heidegger (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1989), p. 158.

43. Henry David Thoreau, Walking (Boston/Cambridge: Applewood, 1987), pp. 2-3 (pages are not numbered).

44. Reiner Schurmann, Wandering Joy (Great Barrington, Mass.: Lindisfarne, 2001), p. xx.

45. Walter Benjamin, Illuminations, trans. Harry Zohn (New York: Schocken, 1968), p. 99 (quoting Georg Lukacs).

46. Heidegger, Being and Time, trans. John Macquarrie and Edward Robinson (New York: Harper, 1962), p. 19.

47. Heidegger's preface to William J. Richardson, Heidegger: Through Phenomenology to Thought (The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, 1963), pp. xx and xxi.

48. Heidegger, The Concept of Time (trans. McNeill), p. 22E.

49. Henry Chadwick's introduction to Saint Augustine's

Confessions, p. xxiv.

50. Ibid., p. xx (the two places are bk. 6, chap. 5 and bk. 7, chap. 7).

51. See Brian Stock, Augustine the Reader (Cambridge, Mass.: Belknap/Harvard, 1996).

52. Albert Bates Lord, The Singer of Tales (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1964) and The Singer Resumes the Tale, ed. Marie Louise Lord (Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 1995).

53. Pierre Hadot, Plotinus or the Simplicity of Vision, trans. Michael Chase (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1993).

54. Ibid., p. xi (cf. also p. 40).

55. Henry Vaughan, The Complete Poems, ed. Alan Rudrum (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1978), p. 227.

56. See my discussion of this saying of Heraclitus in my Time and Myth (New York: Doubleday, 1973; rpt. Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press, 1975), p. 3.

57. George MacDonald, The Golden Key (New York: Far-rar, Straus & Giroux, 1967), p. 60.

58. Saint Augustine, Confessions (Chadwick), p. 230 (bk. 11, chap. 14).

59. MacDonald, The Golden Key, p. 60.

60. Heidegger, The Concept of Time (McNeill), pp. 5E-6E.

61. Saint Augustine, Confessions, p. 242 (bk. 11, chap. 27). The Latin is in Augustine, Confessions, ed. and commentary by J. J. O'Donnell (Oxford: Clarendon, 1992), vol. 1, p. 162.

62. Matthew 18:3 (RSV).

63. See my discussion in The Way of All the Earth, pp.

154-155.

64. Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland, ed. Donald Gray (New York: W. W. Norton, 1972), p. 79 (chap. 10).

65. Plotinus, Enneads 6:9 in A. H. Armstrong, trans., Plotinus, vol. 7 (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1988), pp. 333 and 335. Translation modified. See my discussion in The Music of Time, p. 159.

66. Beethoven, String Quartet in F Major (Op. 135) (London: Eulenburg, 1911), p. 20 (cf. explanation on pp. i-ii).

The Vision of Emanation

1. Saint Thomas Aquinas, Summa Theologiae (one vol. ed.), p. 223 (I, q. 45, a. 3), and Summa Contra Gentiles (Rome: Leonine manual edition, 1934), p. 104 (bk. 2, chap. 18).

2. Saint Thomas, Summa Theologiae, p. 221 (title of question 45 and I, q. 45, a. 1).

3. Ibid., p. 142 (I, q. 27, a. 1).

4. Robert John Russell, William R. Stoeger, and Francisco J. Ayala, eds., Evolutionary and Molecular Biology (Vatican City: Vatican Observatory Publications and Berkeley, Calif.: Center for Theology and Natural Sciences, 1998), p. 52 (the diagram is also on the cover).

5. See my discussion in The Mystic Road of Love (Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press, 1999), pp. 137-141 ("A Note on the Dante-Riemann Universe").

6. Pierre Hadot, Plotinus or the Simplicity of Vision, p. 40.

7. I am taking this phrase from George Perle's title, The Listening Composer (Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1990).

8. Albert Lord, The Singer of Tales, pp. 97-98, and The Singer Resumes the Tale, ed. Marie Louise Lord (Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 1995), pp. 49 and 62.

9. Claude Lévi-Strauss, Myth and Meaning (New York: Schocken, 1995), p. 3.

10. Cezanne quoted by Joachim Gasquet, Cezanne (Paris: Bernheims-Jeune, 1926), p. 132 (my translation). See my discussion in The Homing Spirit, pp. 43-44.

11. Michel Serres, Genesis, trans. Genevieve James and James Nielsen (Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan Press, 1995), p. 138 (the concluding paragraph of the book).

12. 1 John 1:1, my translation inmy Reading the Gospel, p. 23.

13. W. J. Turner, Mozart (San Francisco: Heron House,

1989), p. 25.

14. Ursula LeGuin, A Wizard of Earthsea (Berkeley, Calif.: Parnassus, 1968), p. 185. See my discussion in my House of Wisdom (San Francisco: Harper & Row, 1985; rpt. Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press, 1993), p. 13.

15. See my discussion in my House of Wisdom, p. 154.

16. Hermann Broch, The Death of Virgil, trans. Jean Starr Untermeyer (New York: Random House/Vintage, 1995), p. 482.

17. The usual reading of John 1:3-4 is "all things were made through him, and without him was not anything made that was made. In him was life . . ." (RSV). But an alternate reading is "was not anything made. That which has been made was life in him" (also RSV in a footnote).

18. See Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, The Phenomenon of Man, trans. Bernard Wall (New York: Harper, 1959), pp. 254272 (on the Omega).

19. I have the music in my Reading the Gospel, pp. 26-27; see also my "Symphony of Songs" and CD in my Deep Rhythm and the Riddle of Eternal Life (Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press, 2008).

20. J. R. R. Tolkien, The Silmarillion, ed. Christopher Tolkien (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1977), pp. 15-22, and C. S. Lewis, The Magician's Nephew (bk. 6 in The Chronicles of Nar-nia) (New York: Collier/Macmillan, 1970), pp. 98-99.

21. Isidore of Seville quoted by Mark Sebanc in the epigraph to his Flight to Hollow Mountain (Grand Rapids, Mich.: Eerdmans, 1996).

22. Saint Augustine lists "the four perturbations of the mind" in his Confessions (Chadwick), p. 191 (bk. 10, chap. 14).

23. S0ren Kierkegaard, The Sickness unto Death, trans. Walter Lowrie (along with Fear and Trembling) (New York: Double-day/Anchor, 1954), p. 168 ("The self is just as possible as it is necessary; for though it is itself, it has to become itself").

24. See Walter Burkert, René Girard, and Jonathan Z. Smith, Violent Origins, ed. Robert G. Hamerton-Kelly (Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1987).

25. Pierre Hadot, Plotinus or the Simplicity of Vision, p. 40.

26. Martin Buber, Ecstatic Confessions, p. 11.

27. The Collected Works of Saint John of the Cross, trans. Kieran Kavanaugh and Otilio Rodriguez (Washington, D.C.: Institute of Carmelite Studies, 1979), p. 179 (Ascent of Mount Carmel, bk. 2, chap. 22).

28. Martin Heidegger, "Letter on Humanism," trans. Frank A. Capuzzi in Martin Heidegger, Pathmarks, ed. William McNeill (Cambridge, U.K.: Cambridge University Press, 1998), p. 239.

29. See Robert Osserman, Poetry of the Universe (New York: Doubleday/Anchor, 1995), and my "Note on the DanteRiemann Universe" in my Mystic Road of Love, pp. 137-141.

30. T. S. Eliot, The Three Voices of Poetry (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1954).

31. Wittgenstein, Tractatus, trans. C. K. Ogden (New York: Dover, 1999), p. 108 (#7, his concluding sentence).

32. Meister Eckhart quoted by Martin Heidegger, The Pathway (from Listening, Spring 1967, vol. 2, no. 2), ed. and trans. Thomas O'Meara, p. 7.

33. Ibid., p. 9.

34. Wordsworth, "Preface to Lyrical Ballads" in William Wordsworth, ed. Stephen Gill (Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 1990), p. 611.

35. Christopher Smart, Jubilate Agno, Fragment A41 and B246, 248, 249 in Karina Williamson, ed., The Poetical Works of Christopher Smart, vol. 1 (Oxford: Clarendon, 1980), pp. 4 and 53. Benjamin Britten put these words to music in Rejoice in the Lamb, opus 30 (composed for the consecration of St. Matthew's Church in Northampton, September 21, 1942). See my discussion in my Church of the Poor Devil (New York: Macmillan, 1982; rpt. Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press, 1983), pp. 122-123.

36. Wilfrid Mellers in The Messiaen Companion, ed. Peter Hill (Portland, Ore.: Amadeus, 1995), p. 222. See my discussion in my Mystic Road of Love, p. 86.

37. T. S. Eliot, Four Quartets (San Diego, New York, London: Harvest/Harcourt Brace, 1988), p. 44 ("The Dry Salvages," lines 200-202).

38. Wittgenstein, Tractatus, trans. D. F. Pears and B. F. McGuinness, p. 147 (#6.4311).

39. Ursula LeGuin, A Fisherman of the Inland Sea (New York: Harper Prism, 1995), p. 159.

40. I haven't been able to trace the source of this quotation, but I have used it often, for instance in Reading the Gospel, pp. 129-130.

41. From my translation of the poem of Saint John of the Cross, "Dark Night," in my book Love's Mind, p. 100. I have changed my translation of dichosa from "lucky" to "happy. "

42. F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Crack-Up (New York: New Directions, 1945), p. 75.

43. Ephesians 3:17 (KJ).

44. Henryk Sienkiewicz, Quo Vadis, trans. Jeremiah Curtin (New York: Heritage, 1960), p. 168.

45. Wittgenstein, Tractatus (Ogden), p. 107 (#6.522).

46. Arthur Zajonc, Catching the Light (New York: Oxford University Press, 1993).

47. Heidegger, Discourse on Thinking, p. 55.

48. George Steiner, Real Presences (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1989).

49. I have this inscription on a plaque someone gave me, but I have been unable to locate the source.

50. Wittgenstein, Tractatus (Ogden), p. 107 (#6.44).

51. See above, n. 35.

52. Matthew 1:23 (KJ).

The Vision of Return

1. Heidegger, Discourse on Thinking, p. 65.

2. Saint Augustine, Confessions (Chadwick), p. 3 (bk. 1, chap. 1).

3. Robert Vaughan, Hours with the Mystics, 3rd ed., vol. 1 (London: Strahan, 1880), p. 80.

4. Leo Bersani and Ulysse Dutoit, The Forms of Violence (New York: Schocken, 1985), pp. 110-125.

5. Robert Graves, Adam's Rib with wood engravings by James Metcalf (London: Trianon Press, 1955/New York: Thomas Yoseloff, 1958).

6. Miguel Cervantes, Don Quixote, trans. Burton Raffel (New York/London: Norton, 1995), p. 471 (part 2, chap. 23).

7. Cervantes, Don Quijote de la Mancha, ed. Antonio Paluzie Barrel (Barcelona: Editorial Ramon Sopena, 1975), p. 608.

8. See above, my chapter "The Vision of Emanation," n. 8.

9. See above, ibid., n. 22.

10. Isak Dinesen, Last Tales (New York: Random House/ Vintage, 1957), p. 26.

11. Ursula LeGuin, The Other Wind (New York: Ace Books, 2003), p. 200.

12. Wendell Berry, A World Lost (Washington, D.C.: Counterpoint, 1996), p. 148.

13. Heidegger, Discourse on Thinking, p. 85. See George Steiner, Martin Heidegger (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1991), pp. 15, 131, 146.

14. Shakespeare, Sonnets 30:2 and 107:2.

15. Plotinus, Enneads 6:9 in A. H. Armstrong, trans., Ploti-nus, vol. 7 (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1988), pp. 333 and 335. See my discussion in my Music of Time, p. 159.

16. W. B. Yeats, Collected Poems (New York: Macmillan, 1972), p. 214 (last lines of his poem "Among School Children").

17. Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland (chap. 10) quoted above in "God Sensible to the Heart," n. 64.

18. Brian Friel, Dancing at Lughnasa (London: Faber & Faber, 1990). The dance occurs in act 1 of the play, but in the climax at the end of the screenplay by Frank McGuinness, Brian Friel's Dancing at Lughnasa (London: Faber & Faber, 1998).

19. Bernard Lonergan, Method in Theology (New York: Herder & Herder, 1972), p. 290.

20. Nicolas Malebranche, Oeuvres, ed. Genevieve Rodis-Lewis and Germain Malbreil (Paris: Gallimard, 1979), vol. 1, p. 1132 (my trans.). See my discussion in my Love's Mind, pp. 86-87, and my Reading the Gospel, pp. 7-12.

21. The Cloud of Unknowing and Other Works, trans. Clifton Wolters (New York: Penguin, 1978), p. 105 (chap. 38).

22. Rainer Maria Rilke, Letters to a Young Poet, trans. M. D. Herter Norton (New York: Norton, 1954), p. 35 (letter #4).

23. The Soliloquies of Saint Augustine (Latin and English), trans. Thomas F. Gilligan (New York: Cosmopolitan Science and Art Service Co., 1943), p. 17 (bk. 1, chap. 2).

24. See my discussion of these sentences in the second chapter of my A Vision Quest (Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press, 2006).

25. Saint Augustine, Soliloquies (Gilligan), p. 147 (bk. 2, chap. 20).

26. Ibid., pp. 156-157 (from his Revisions or Retractations).

27. Maurice Blanchot in The Notebooks of Joseph Joubert (Auster), pp. 180-181.

28. Sylvia S. Judson, The Quiet Eye (Washington, D.C.: Regnery, 1954).

29. See my discussion of these opening words of the Requiem Mass in the first chapter of my Deep Rhythm and the Riddle of Eternal Life (Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press, 2008).

30. Lessing as quoted by Kierkegaard in Concluding Unscientific Postscript, trans. David Swenson and Walter Lowrie (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1941), p. 97.

31. Wittgenstein, Tractatus (Ogden), p. 107 (#6.44).

32. Patricia A. McKillip, Riddle-Master (New York: Ace Books, 1999), p. 179.

3 3. Robert A. Thurman, Inside Tibetan Buddhism (San Francisco: Harper Collins, 1995), p. 17. See my discussion in my Reading the Gospel, p. 92.

34. John Henry Newman, Prose and Poetry, ed. George N. Shuster (New York: Allyn & Bacon, 1925), p. 116.

35. Patricia McKillip, The Moon and the Face (New York: Berkeley, 1986), p. 88.

36. This is a footnote in Kant's Critique of Practical Reason, trans. Lewis White Beck (Indianapolis-New York: Bobbs-Merrill, 1956), p. 25, note. See my discussion in my Way of All the Earth, p. 96 and n. 54 on p. 106.

37. Tolkien, Lord of the Rings, p. 439.

38. See Ernest Nagel and James R. Newman, Godel's Proof, ed. Douglas R. Hofstadter (New York: New York University Press, 2001).

39. Robert Frost, The Road Not Taken and Other Poems (New York: Dover, 1993), p. 1.

40. John Henry Newman, An Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine, ed. J. M. Cameron (Baltimore: Penguin, 1974), p. 114. See my discussion in my Love's Mind, p. 9.

41. Master Eckhart, Parisian Questions and Prologues, trans. Armand A. Maurer (Toronto: Pontifical Institute of Medieval Studies, 1974), pp. 85-86. See my discussion in my House of Wisdom, pp. 3-4.

42. See my discussion of the three movements of contemplation in my Love's Mind, pp. 53-82. Cf. Saint Thomas Aquinas, Opera Omnia, vol. 2 (Stuttgart: Fromman-Holzboog, 1980), ed. Roberto Busa, p. 744 (Summa Theologiae, II-II, q. 180, a. 6).

43. Patricia McKillip, Riddle-Master, p. 296.

44. Logan's Run (1976), directed by Michael Anderson, starring Michael York and Jenny Agutter.

45. Saint Thomas Aquinas, Opera Omnia, vol. 2, pp. 742745 and pp. 746-747 (Summa Theologiae, II-II, qq. 180 and 182).

46. Immanuel Kant, Critique of Practical Reason (trans. Beck), p. 166.

47. See my discussion in my House of Wisdom, p. xi and n. 7 (p. xiii).

48. Spinoza, Ethics, trans. Andrew Boyle and rev. G. W. R. Parkinson (London: Dent/Everyman, 1993), p. 219.

The Far Point on the Circle

1. Wendell Berry, The Wheel (San Francisco: North Point, 1982), p. 26.

2. Nowadays metaphor in cognitive science is held to be more than just a figure of speech, and "metaphorical mappings are systematic and not arbitrary," George Lakoff and Rafael E. Nunez, Where Mathematics Comes From (New York: Basic Books, 2001), p. 41. See my discussion in my A Vision Quest in the chapter entitled "Riddling, perplexed, labyrinthical soul," pp. 45-65.

3. Nicholas of Cusa, Of Learned Ignorance, trans. Germain Heron (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1954).

4. The first two readings are from KJ and RSV. The third ("has not overshadowed it") is from Peter Levi, The Holy Gospel of John (Wilton, Conn.: Morehouse-Barlow, 1985), p. 7. See my discussion in Reading the Gospel, p. 24 where I prefer "overshadowed. "

5. John Henry Newman, Apologia pro Vita Sua (London: Longmans, Green, 1908), p. 195.

6. Ibid., pp. 217-218.

7. John Richard Green, A Short History of the English People, rev. Alice Stopford Green (New York: American Book Company, 1916), pp. 375 and 376. The judgments of others on his work left him "lonely" (p. xiii).

8. J. R. Green quoted in Webster's Third New International Dictionary, ed. Philip Babcock Gove (Springfield, Mass.: G. & C. Merriam, 1961), p. 566.

9. Walter Benjamin, "The Storyteller" in his Illuminations, ed. Hannah Arendt and trans. Harry Zohn (New York: Schocken, 1969), p. 99. See my discussion in my Love's Mind, pp. 27-28.

10. Heidegger, The Concept of Time, trans. William McNeill (Oxford: Blackwell, 1992), p. 22 (conclusion).

11. Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace, the Maude translation edited by George Gibian (New York: Norton, 1996), p. 244 (bk. 3, chap. 13).

12. These are the words for "Soul Dance" in my Mystic Road of Love, p. 120. My first discussion of "I walk alone" is in my Reasons of the Heart, pp. 2-3.

13. These are the words for the Prelude to "The King of the Golden River" in my Road of the Heart's Desire, p. 123. See also the song "All One" in my Music of Time, p. 113.

14. Dag Hammarskjöld on the center of stillness. See above, "Reasons of the Heart," n. 5, and on his "Thanks!" and "Yes!" see ibid., n. 21.

15. Samuel Rogers, Human Life (1819) as quoted in The Oxford Minidictionary of Quotations (Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 1983), p. 284.

16. My translation of Cicero's words Numquam se minus otiosum esse quam cum otiosus, nec minus solum quam cum solus esset in De Officiis, ed. Walter Miller (New York: Macmillan, 1913), p. 270 (bk. 3, chap. 1).

17. Patricia McKillip, The Sorceress and the Cygnet (New York: Ace, 1991), p. 92. See my discussion in my Love's Mind,

p. 15.

18. Henry Chadwick's introduction to Saint Augustine's Confessions, p. xxiv.

19. Kierkegaard, The Concept of Dread, trans. Walter Low-rie (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1957), p. 139.

20. Reiner Schurmann, Wandering Joy (Great Barrington, Mass.: Lindisfarne, 2001), p. xx.

21. Nikos Kazantzakis, The Odyssey: A Modern Sequel, trans. Kimon Friar (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1958). See Dante, Inferno, canto 26, lines 94ff. on Odysseus continuing to wander. See my discussion in my Time and Myth, pp. 32ff.

22. Kazantzakis, Odyssey, bk. 16, line 959.

23. G. B. Shaw, Man and Superman (London: Constable,

1930), p. 171.

24. Simone Weil, Waiting for God, trans. Emma Craufurd (New York: Putnam, 1951), p. 135.

25. Heidegger quoted by Reiner Schurmann in the epigraph of Wandering Joy, p. v.

26. Werner Herzog, "Every man for himself and God against all" in his Screenplays, trans. Alan Greenberg and Martje Herzog (New York: Tanam, 1980), pp. 97 and 172.

27. Shakespeare, Twelfth Night, act 2, scene 3, line 45.

28. Tolkien, Lord of the Rings, p. 73.

29. Ibid., p. 739.

30. M. L. Haskins quoted by King George VI in a Christmas broadcast in 1939, King George VI to His Peoples (London: John Murray, 1952), p. 21.

31. Patricia McKillip, Riddle-Master, p. 179, quoted earlier in this chapter and above, "The Vision of Return," n. 32.

32. Nicolas Malebranche, Oeuvres, ed. Genevieve Rodis-Lewis and Germain Malbreil (Paris: Gallimard, 1979), vol. 1, p. 1132 (my translation). See my discussion of this saying in my

Love's Mind, pp. 86-87, and my Reading the Gospel, pp. 7, 11-12, 74, 100, and 129.

33. I culled these four sentences from Tolkien's Lord of the Rings. They are chapter titles, chaps. 3, 4, 5, and 6 in my House of Wisdom.

34. The poem is in my Mystic Road of Love, pp. x-xi and 104-105, and the music is on p. 106.

35. My translation of "Dark Night" by Saint John of the Cross is in my Love's Mind, pp. 100-101. But see above n.41 in the chapter "The Vision of Emanation" on translating la noche dichosa as "the happy night" instead of "the lucky night. "

36. A translation of el camino de la union del amor con Dios in the preface to The Dark Night of the Soul, also in my Love's Mind, p. 99.

37. Ramón Lull, The Book of the Lover and the Beloved, trans. E. Allison Peers (London: SPCK, 1923), p. 49 (#118).

38. Albert Schweitzer, The Mysticism of Paul the Apostle, trans. William Montgomery (Baltimore and London: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998), p. 5.

39. See my description of making the Stations of the Cross in the Rothko Chapel in my House of Wisdom, pp. 81-92.

40. The music is in my Reading the Gospel, pp. 26-27, and the words also on pp. 24 and 141.

41. See my discussion in my Church of the Poor Devil, pp. 4-5 and 13-15.

42. Martin Buber, I and Thou, trans. Ronald Gregor Smith (New York: Scribners, 1958), p. 67. See my discussion in my Reading the Gospel, p. 123.

43. Hannah Arendt, The Human Condition (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1998), p. 244.

44. Thomas Kelly, A Testament of Devotion (New York: Harper & Row, 1941), p. 40.

45. My translation of Saint Augustine's verses, the only ones we have from his pen, in The City of God, bk. 15, chap. 22,

Haec tua sunt, bona sunt, quia tu bonus ista creasti.

Nil nostrum est in eis, nisi quod peccamus amantes

Ordine neglecto pro te, quod conditur abs te.

I am using the Loeb edition by Philip Levine, vol. 5 (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1966), p. 544. In Love's Mind, p. 112 I translated

These goods are good because they are by you,

and nothing ours is in them but our sin

of loving them by you instead of you.

But there I couldn't get Augustine's phrase ordine neglecto into the third line in my blank verse translation.

46. Franz Cumont, Afterlife in Roman Paganism (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1922) and Lux Perpetua (Paris: P. Guethner, 1949).

47. My formulation of the problem of death in my first book, The City of the Gods (New York: Macmillan, 1965; rpt. Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press, 1978), pp. v and 217.

48. Heidegger's definition of "mystery" in his Discourse on Thinking, p. 55.

49. E. M. Forster, Howard's End (New York: Knopf, 1946), p. 214 (chap. 22).

50. This is a distinction I make in the first chapter of my Time and Myth.

51. Andrew Marvell, "To His Coy Mistress" in Six Centuries of Great Poetry (New York: Bantam Doubleday Dell, 1955), p. 258.

52. W. H. Auden, "In Memory of W.B. Yeats" in Auden, Collected Poems, ed. Edward Mendelson (New York: Vintage,

1991), p. 249.

53. Martin Buber, Ecstatic Confessions, ed. Paul Flohr and trans. Esther Cameron (San Franciso: Harper & Row, 1985), p. 7. See Paul Flohr, "The Road to I and Thou" in Texts and Responses, Studies Presented to Nahum N. Glatzer, ed. Michael Fishbane and Paul Flohr (Leiden: Brill, 1975), pp. 201-225.

54. Buber's formulation is the concluding sentence of his introduction to his Ecstatic Confessions (cited above) and Wittgenstein's is in his Tractatus (Ogden), p. 107 (#6.44).

55. See my discussion of Eckhart's sentence "Existence is God" (Esse est Deus) in my House of Wisdom, p. 3 and my Music of Time, p. 26.

56. See my discussion of Eckhart on the Trinity born in us in my Reasons of the Heart, p. 48.

57. Leo Perutz, Leonardo's Judas, trans. Eric Mosbacher (New York: Arcade, 1989), p. 1246. See my discussion in my Peace of the Present, p. 57.

58. Chandogya Upanishad, VI, i2ff. See my discussion in my Way of All the Earth, p. 219.

59. Martin Heidegger, Poetry, Language, Thought, trans. Albert Hofstadter (New York: Harper & Row, 1975), p. 4. See my discussion in my Road of the Heart's Desire, p. 17 and p. 64.

60. Diogenes' description of Plato's philosophy in Herakleitos and Diogenes, trans. Guy Davenport (San Francisco: Grey Fox, 1983), p. 47 (aphorism #47).

61. Robert Jay Lifton, The Broken Connection (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1979), p. 25 (Freud on "oceanic feeling"), and pp. 24-35 (Lifton on "the experience of transcendence" as "symbolic immortality").

62. Paul Tillich, Systematic Theology (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1951), vol. 1, p. 239.

63. See my article "St. Thomas' Theology of Participation" in Theological Studies, vol. 18 (1957), pp. 487ff.

64. Kierkegaard, Fear and Trembling (with The Sickness unto Death), trans. Walter Lowrie (New York: Doubleday, 1954),

p. 30.

65. Wittgenstein, Tractatus #6.4311, p. 106 (Ogden) and p. 147 (Pears and McGuinness).

66. Kierkegaard, The Sickness unto Death (with Fear and Trembling) (Lowrie), p. 150.

67. Wendell Berry, A World Lost (Washington, D.C.: Counterpoint, 1996), p. 150.

68. Kierkegaard, The Sickness unto Death (with Fear and Trembling) (Lowrie), p. 147.

69. Berry, A World Lost, pp. 150-151.

70. Dante, Paradiso, canto 33, line 142.

The Vision of God with Us

1. See James Joyce, Finnegans Wake (New York: Viking Press, 1939), first and last lines.

2. See the discussion of this saying by Kenneth Cragg, Jesus and the Muslims (London: Allen & Unwin, 1985), p. 47, and by Joachim Jeremias, Unknown Sayings of Jesus, trans. R. H. Fuller (London: SPCK, 1964), pp. 111-118, and my discussion in my Peace of the Present, p. 102, and my Reading the Gospel, pp. 60-61.

3. See my conversation with David Daube in my Peace of the Present, pp. 93-95.

4. See my conversation with Erik Erikson, ibid., pp.

97-99.

5. John Donne, "A Hymn to God the Father" in Donne, Selected Poems, ed. Shane Waller (New York: Dover, 1993), p. 70. I am reading "Son" for "sun."

6. See my discussion of Al-Alawi's saying in my Homing Spirit, p. 76.

7. Nicholas of Cusa, The Vision of God, trans. Emma Gur-ney Salter (New York: Ungar, 1960). See my discussion in my Reasons of the Heart, pp. 39-40.

8. Tolkien, Lord of the Rings, p. 76, quoted above in "God Sensible to the Heart," n. 2.

9. I have been unable to locate the place where I found this saying in Gandhi's writings.

10. Malebranche's saying quoted above in "God Sensible to the Heart," n. 39.

11. Henry Vaughan quoted above in "God Sensible to the Heart," n. 55.

12. This phrase is from "Dionysius' Mystical Teaching" (Dionise Hid Divinite) in The Cloud of Unknowing and Other Works, trans. Clifton Wolters (New York: Penguin, 1978), p. 211.

13. Saint Augustine, Confessions (Chadwick), p. 208 (bk. 10, chap. 33).

14. Pascal, Pensees, #205 (Brunschvicg) (my translation). "The eternal silence of these infinite spaces" is #206 (Brun-schvicg).

15. Jung, Answer to Job, trans. R. F. C. Hull (London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1954). See my discussion and references in A Search for God in Time and Memory, pp. 196-197.

16. 1 Kings 9:3 and 2 Chronicles 7:16 (RSV), the epigraph of my book The House of Wisdom. See my discussion there of the eyes and heart, God's, Christ's, and ours.

17. Leo Bersani and Ulysse Dutoit, The Forms of Violence (New York: Schocken, 1985), pp. 110-125 on "The Restlessness of Desire."

18. Kierkegaard, The Sickness unto Death (with Fear and Trembling) (Lowrie), pp. 162 and 168.

19. See my discussion of "I walk alone" in my Reasons of the Heart, pp. 2-3.

20. The words of Plotinus are "a flight of the alone to the Alone" (fuge monou pros monon). See my discussion in my Music of Time, p. 28 and n. 44 on p. 191.

21. Newman, Apologia pro Vita Sua (London: Longmans, 1908), p. 195.

22. T. S. Eliot, Four Quartets (New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1988), p. 28 ("East Coker," line 128).

23. Simone Weil, Waiting for God (a translation of Attente de Dieu by Emma Craufurd) (New York: Harper & Row, 1951).

24. My translation of his poem "Dark Night" in my Love's Mind, p. 100.

25. My translation of John 1:4-5 in my Reading the Gospel,

p. 24.

26. Albert Schweitzer, The Quest of the Historical Jesus (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998), p. 403. See my discussion in my Reading the Gospel, p. 127.

27. George Steiner, Real Presences (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1989).

28. See above, n. 1 of my preface.