Scholarly article on topic 'COINS: An economic development tool for education, economic and workforce development in Open Source Economic Development'

COINS: An economic development tool for education, economic and workforce development in Open Source Economic Development Academic research paper on "Social and economic geography"

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Abstract of research paper on Social and economic geography, author of scientific article — Betsey Merkel

Abstract Communities and their regions have an unprecedented opportunity to integrate higher levels of organization, process and tools to connect legacy assets residing in colleges, universities, and libraries to people and their ideas; to reinvigorate institutions, organizations and government; and to strengthen creativity, collaboration, and communication for innovation and enterprise in education, economic, and workforce development. This paper begins a discussion of the value collaborative innovation networks (COINS) offer to accelerate and strengthen innovation in Open Source Economic Development (OSED) in the Civic Space, and to explore the design of an improved model of I-Open Civic Forums, a process driven approach to build networks, community, and communications for enterprise collaboration. By collaborating with research in the emerging Science of Collaboration, this practical model will strengthen research as well as individual experience and collaborative behaviours to create new knowledge. With this intelligence, industry innovation, design, and enterprise solutions can more successfully address global issues affecting both social and economic aspects of society today.

Academic research paper on topic "COINS: An economic development tool for education, economic and workforce development in Open Source Economic Development"

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Procedia Social and Behavioral Sciences 2 (2010) 6516-6531

COINs2009: Collaborative Innovation Networks Conference

COINS: An economic development tool for education, economic and workforce development in Open Source Economic Development

Betsey Merkel

Co-Founder and Director, The Institute for Open Economic Networks (I-Open), 4415 Euclid Ave., Suite 301, Cleveland, Ohio 44103, U.S.A. Elsevier use only: Received date here; revised date here; accepted date here

Abstract

Communities and their regions have an unprecedented opportunity to integrate higher levels of organization, process and tools to connect legacy assets residing in colleges, universities, and libraries to people and their ideas; to reinvigorate institutions, organizations and government; and to strengthen creativity, collaboration, and communication for innovation and enterprise in education, economic, and workforce development. This paper begins a discussion of the value collaborative innovation networks (COINS) offer to accelerate and strengthen innovation in Open Source Economic Development (OSED) in the Civic Space, and to explore the design of an improved model of I-Open Civic Forums, a process driven approach to build networks, community, and communications for enterprise collaboration. By collaborating with research in the emerging Science of Collaboration, this practical model will strengthen research as well as individual experience and collaborative behaviours to create new knowledge. With this intelligence, industry innovation, design, and enterprise solutions can more successfully address global issues affecting both social and economic aspects of society today.

Keywords: Open Source Economic Development; networks; innovation; creativity; enterprise; community; collaboration; education; leadership; knowledge creation; Futuring; Question Science

1877-0428 © 2010 Published by Elsevier Ltd. doi:10.1016/j.sbspro.2010.04.061

"COINS: An Economic Development Tool for Education, and Economic and Workforce Development in Open Source Economic Development" begins with the discussion of the strategy, "pathway to shared prosperity," a collaborative process to link people and their ideas to education, economic, and workforce development. (Figure 1. Pathway to Shared Prosperity) Our methods are based in Open Source Economic Development (OSED), a networked approach to linking and leveraging innovation with civic, business, government and academic resources and assets for education, economic, and workforce development. We view pathways as collaborative strategies designed from experiential learning in the Civic Space, a demographic that shares contributions from leaders in civic, business, academic, and government. Pathway for shared prosperity consists of the following sequence of understandings and activities beginning with, the emergence of the Civic Space;

pathway to collaboration; insight and innovation networks; Civic Forums; industry innovation;

COINS in the Civic Space; the experience pathway; collaborative communities; and a Civic Forum network. This paper explores a method of implementation to integrate a networked platform of Civic Forums, the adoption of COINS, research in the emerging Science of Collaboration, and the I-Open Civic Forum process, the practice of building networks and mentoring collaborative leadership for enterprise collaboration, to connect innovation to place-based assets to strengthen local, national, and global sustainability.

Figure 1. Pathway to Shared Prosperity

Emergence of the Civic Space (Figure 2. Emergence of the Civic Space) The Civic Space refers to everything outside the four walls of any organization and includes anyone with initiative. It embodies the knowledge and experience of people in civic affairs, business development,

academic research and education, and government systems and infrastructure. Historically, the Civic Space was simpler and more organized than it is today (see map inset). Last century profitable industries

generously invested in colleges, universities, and libraries often creating whole systems of buildings and networks of human capital to build knowledge assets to assure assets were shared. Today, because of the speed of change, networks are fractured and there is a lack of social connectivity and collaboration. Organizations responsible for stewarding legacy assets may find themselves disconnected from the Civic Space, and burdened by high overhead costs and low foot traffic, functioning as silos unable to provide the level of service

and connectivity now required. Added to this, is a rapid increase in the number of people with talent and creativity who are unemployed, underemployed, or who are with no prospect of work, coping with the pressing affects of poverty. This rupture is the disconnection of people and their ideas to hope and prosperity. A One Stop Manager for workforce development and training serving five counties bridging Ohio and Pennsylvania recently said, "We have seen over a 400% increase in demand for services from our One Stop that serves five counties across two states in the last six months." Economist Dean Baker, co-director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research, stated September 2009, "The unemployment rate hit 9.7 percent in August, up from 9.4 percent in July. According to the establishment survey, the economy shed 216,000 jobs in August. In addition, the job loss numbers for June and July were revised up by 49,000. This puts the average rate of job loss over the last three months at 318,000 per month." The Civic Space is exploding in size. It is rich with the insights and innovations of people who care passionately about issues affecting the communities they live in and the regions they work in. Everyone in the Civic Space has an idea, a solution, and most, a mental model for what may be an unexpressed understanding of systems that interests them or that they may be affected by. These are important insights to guide innovation. In the Civic Space everyone is affected equally by economic and social forces, positive and negative, that arise in response to local and global issues. This is the emergence of the Civic Space, where no one can tell anyone what to do, where there may be a low level of civility, but everyone has an idea. We are in an unprecedented time of change, disconnection, and

Figure 2. Emergence of the Civic Space

opportunity. Our challenge is to design and implement higher levels of organization, process, and tools to respond to change, integrate COINS, and build the networks needed to reconnect people and their ideas to legacy assets for national and global sustainability.

Pathway to Collaboration (Figure 3. Pathway to Collaboration) This paper suggests a pathway to collaboration by employing COINS to focus efforts to re-connect people and their ideas to legacy assets located in college, universities, and libraries in a networked platform of Civic Forums hosted by those institutions. In addition to sharing legacy assets, the role of colleges, universities, and libraries is one of conveners and connectors. COINS and Civic Forums can strengthen colleges, universities, and libraries in several ways: the first, to articulate the most valuable role today as conveners of open innovation by sharing legacy assets and in-kind resources with people to develop their innovations; as co-creators of industry innovation capable of revolutionizing national education, economic, and workforce development because conveners can catalyze change quickly helping people to be more creative and to build trust; as stewards of powerful civic networks connecting students, staff, academic, and business leaders to people and their ideas; and lastly, as a servant leader organization, in the invaluable role of serving a collaborative community culture and it's continued enrichment in the areas of inquiry, altruism, tolerance, giving, attribution, and leadership. The adoption of any or all of these roles will attract more people and more opportunities to address resource disconnection. Civic Forums spin out next generation projects that continue to develop outside of the forums; revitalizing legacy infrastructure of institutions, organizations, and government, now often corrupt, fractured and unable to adequately connect to serve citizens. Collaborating with these new enterprise efforts, institutions, organizations, and government entities can advance their progress in education, economic, and workforce development. For organizations, being a part of solutions such as these can develop new industry markets and resource supply chains rapidly. Institutional communications will become social and inextricably purposeful building social capital and revealing powerful opportunities to lead for the good of economic and social endeavours in service of society. COINS integrated in a systems approach such as this can transform each organization that participates, as well as an entire community or it's region. The legacy infrastructure of institutions and government built for economies never to return and unable to serve the sudden and unprecedented level of citizens needing services in employment, skills training, and health care, now needs the insights of relevant research, people and their ideas to rewire. Colleges, universities, and libraries can become central to networked communities, benefiting wisely from close proximity to new ideas for competitive, relevant research while serving as valued, informed partners in local and national leadership.

Figure 3. Pathway to Collaboration

Insight and Innovation Networks

(Figure 4. Insight and Innovation Networks) I-Open is building an open source research database of insights and innovations harvested from both the empirical and rational disciplines for the advancement of knowledge in the Civic Space. Some transcriptions are available now; future publications informed by this research will focus on developing context and standards. Interviews are contributed and share the stories of people and their ideas as described through the lens of the Innovation Framework. The Innovation Framework offers a starting point for people to think about how to invest their ideas in the Civic Space for prosperous, sustainable communities. The Innovation Framework identifies five areas of investment: Brainpower as our most competitive asset; innovation and entrepreneurial networks as valuable infrastructure to leverage Brainpower; Quality, Connected Places to gather, share, and improve knowledge; Dialogue and Inclusion to guarantee

transparency, diversity and openness; and Branding Stories to communicate the intrinsic nature of a culture and it's success stories. In the complex, open

system of the Civic Space, the Innovation Framework is a scalable guide for talent and value that can apply to individuals and organizations. Together, COINS and the Innovation Framework help us to stay focused and organized to know what information, talent, and materials people need to grow their ideas. Research is the first priority of I-Open strategic activity. I-Open's approach to research is to create and grow a portfolio of actionable hypotheses for shared intellectual property, and to document and share successful models, examples, practices, and tools to strengthen Open Source Economic Development. I-Open networked communities, face-to-face and online, offer valuable research opportunities in industry specific topic areas as well as lateral inquiry across disciplines for data harvesting. 'Evidence' is used here to refer to the footprint of new, experimental activity in Open Source Economic Development occurring mainly in the last six years by the I-Open team. Activity is experimental in that it is unprecedented in education, economic, and workforce development industries.

Figure 4. Insight and Innovation Networks

Questions to consider:

• What is the value of COINS to strengthen creativity, collaboration, and communication in the Civic Space?

• What is the role of colleges, universities, and libraries in education, economic, and workforce development? What is the role of creative industry education, research, and businesses?

• How can an accelerated networked platform of Civic Forums strengthen creativity, collaboration, and communication for national and global sustainability?

• How will education, economic, and workforce development benefit from the emerging Science of Collaboration in the Civic Space?

• How can COINS strengthen creativity, collaboration, and communication in an accelerated model of I-Open Civic Forums for enterprise collaboration?

I-Open interview questions are designed with a focus on Question Science, a process driven approach to knowledge creation developed by Bruce LaDuke: "The knowledge/question cycle is idea generation, knowledge creation, scientific method, creative problem solving, creative method, creativity, innovation, etc. While these things are often seen as a lot of separate entities, they all work within the same simple knowledge/question cycle. The creativity/art side of the brain leverages expanding, rational logic; the discovery/innovation, science side of the brain leverages diverging, empirical logic. But then, both work by the same knowledge/question cycle." Bruce explains, "The right/left brain thinking is used as a way to describe how we think, but it is important to realize that this really describes the core brain function which is twofold: 1) A logical storage and retrieval capacity (knowing) and 2) The questioning of what we know (questioning). Questions sit between the known and the unknown and bring us to new knowledge. The interaction of 1 and 2 is being described in the left/right brain thinking idea." Interviews go beyond reporting; they share deep critical thinking in theoretical and practical research from both empirical and rational disciplines, ultimately guiding conversations to explore unknown and known information as it applies to the issues and topics being discussed. Interviews inform the design of Civic Forum conversations, focusing discussions on relevant topics, solutions, and new insights. Conversations improve on that information. The I-Open insight and innovation network shares over one hundred interviews online, forty-six group conversations, or one thousand voices, in one hundred and fifty hours of content that has been collected over a nineteen month period (to date) from community contributions. I-Open is in the process of archiving and sharing knowledge from I-Open interview research. Topics focus on energy, civic collaboration, health care, Futuring, government systems, convergence, and creativity, for example. Insights include the value of proximity to innovation, storytelling to innovation, information design to integrate organization and process customization, and the importance of listening in decision-making.

I-Open Civic Forums (Figure 5. I-Open Civic Forums) create the open, neutral spaces for civic entrepreneurs to advance new conversations focused on powerful topics, such as health care, food, water, land, and energy that deeply affect economic and social investment in communities and their regions today. Civic Forums model collaborative leadership, build networks, and accelerate "Strategic Doing" - a simple, disciplined process of moving ideas to action quickly. Conversations are appreciative and collaborative but strategic; every forum concludes by asking, "What's next?" encouraging people to think about their next enterprise opportunity. With the implementation of an advanced networked model of Civic Forums, the starting point in the Civic Space for OSED, the integration of COINS and the findings of new sciences, such as the Science of Collaboration, our hope is to contribute to knowledge creation and establish new standards for industry innovation. Civic Forums are guided conversations offering an aesthetic framing of stories informed by people's insights and innovations. Conversation topics focus on the

Figure 5. I-Open Civic Forums

relational value of people and their ideas to the Innovation Framework as a guide for investment of their attention, time and resources. Each conversation is anchored in one category of the Innovation Framework, further developed with topic knowledge from the contributing source, and detailed through questions and the development of group discussion. Conversations draw from both theoretical and practitioner knowledge always asking the question, "What are your next steps?" It's this approach that encourages people to explore new insights, be exposed to unfamiliar perspectives, consider new questions, and reflect on the emotional and objective reasoning of others. These elements together create what some call "quantum" conversations, cultivating new levels of sense making, knowledge creation, and solutions. Civic Forum conversations stimulate activity and energize people, translating into the emergent businesses and innovations such as the design of curriculum and skills training, and ultimately, a plethora of initiatives, working groups, projects and jobs. Forums are guided conversations in the Civic Space, the 'common' area we all share outside the four walls of an organization. By adopting COINS, OSED projects and Civic Forum activity will improve focus of activity, speed of participant adoption, quality of innovation, and the transformative value that enterprise and design offer to competitive industry. Civic Forums are inexpensive to convene and rely on hard analytics and metrics and the values of gratitude, trust, and hope expressed by participants. Every participant has an equal opportunity to build a reputation of integrity based on meritocracy. Because of trust, Civic Forums build networks within networks, coalescing around people's passions and trends, growing collaborative communities to strengthen insights, generate new knowledge, and test the innovations of people. I-Open designs the spaces for civic experiences to happen, and tolerant of ambiguity, Civic Forum leadership encourages the complexity and experimentation necessary for the evolution of research and learning. Our greatest opportunity lies within these communities: to bring together science and art, for the design of human initiative.

INDUSTRY INNOVATION (Figure 6. Industry Innovation)

I-Open Civic Forums build industry networks in existing and new markets. By bringing together industry practitioners, artists, and designers, innovative projects will begin if there are clear pathways for accessing resources and capabilities. This is the point at which colleges, universities, and libraries can make a difference, helping entrepreneurs to connect to resources. Participating companies open to feedback and ideas can grow powerful brands. From our experience over the last six years leading Civic Forums, we know successful communities convene frequently, as people continue their project work outside of the weekly sessions. Project teams will set a year long calendar with check-in points quarterly to present updates, report on goals, and adjust to new ideas from the larger community. A benefit of Civic Forums is people have an opportunity to connect with people who they may not be able to easily connect to, or whom they don't know, to create enterprise and clusters of next generation projects quickly.

C'eated by Betsey Me-<el, l-Open. Ceative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No cc) Derivative Works 3.0 United States - The Institute for Open Economic Networks (I-Open)

Figure 6. Industry Innovation

COINS in the Civic Space (Figure 7. CONDOR applied to the Civic Space)

COINS and CONDOR work well in the Civic Space because they compliment the whole system approach of OSED and value what information brings to improvement, design, and experimentation for enterprise collaboration. I-Open communities share information and generate knowledge. CONDOR recognizes the interconnectedness of different types and sources of knowledge OSED process integrates. Integrating COINS and the ability to map the sequence of flow of information to data creation will be helpful in designing responsive, intelligent Civic Forum

conversations. CONDOR will aid the development of the Civic Forum process, strengthening our ability to strategically design questions to advance knowledge acquisition. A COINS accelerated model will realize the integration of art and science of economic development to leverage new opportunities in what John Maeda, President, Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) calls the key "IDEA" (Intuition, Design, Emotion, Art). Centres in the creative industries who specialize in materials, form, function, flow, and project

design for real and virtual environments provide the highest value as collaborative partners. COINS and the emerging Science of Collaboration can strengthen experiences in the Civic Space, accelerating the exploration of the art and science of knowledge creation in Open Source Economic Development. COINS, as do all sciences, are what bring metrics to OSED. The practice behind the science and art of investing, making, and performing must be informed by measurements and findings from both the empirical sciences such as cognitive science, psychology, biology, and physics in areas of converging logic, as well as the rational disciplines such as technology and art. Knowledge from the integration of these disciplines will guide our approach to organization, sense making, meaning, and context in complex open systems like the Civic Space. It is from this integration and our penchant for critical thinking that people will discover competitive design solutions, key to global sustainability.

Figure 7. CONDOR applied to the Civic Space

Experience Pathway.

(Figure 8. Pathway to Experience in the Civic Space) The psychology of the individual today in the Civic Space can be

unpredictable, reactive, depressed, apathetic, excited, passionate, and brilliant. People in the Civic Space are moving away from thinking and toward feeling, open to emergent opportunities, and sense making based on experience. An

important question to ask is, who is the individual in the

Civic Space today? From our work, we know this is anyone with initiative pursuing an idea. People who participate in Civic Forums are passionate about their ideas, curious, and want to connect to other like-minded people. If you were attending a "swarm" of people contributing to a Civic Forum you would meet people from highly diverse experiences and training, and from very different circumstances. The common denominator is their curiosity, passion, desire to learn, and ambition to create revenue-generating enterprise. The demographic is entirely random and people come and go depending on interest, attention, and tolerance. Figure 2. Emergence of the Civic Space and Figure 8. Experience Pathway in the Civic Space, address the changing role of the individual in society and their relationship to resources and capabilities. Access to resources and capabilities affects an individual's ability to create, to bring their insights and innovations to fruition, and ultimately to find meaning and satisfaction, as what Abraham Maslow describes in a "hierarchy of human needs". Open Source Economic Development, the Innovation Framework, and Civic Forums offer higher levels of organization, process, and tools for people and their ideas, individuals, and their experiences in the Civic Space. This affects the quality and quantity of innovative improvements in civic, business, academic, and government systems and infrastructure. COINS in OSED increase our efficiency in building social and resource networks for people and their ideas directly affecting design and innovation in education, enterprise, and workforce development. The psychology of people in the Civic Space addresses the universal thread among all people: the individual and their concept of self (insight) and relation to others (defined here as activity, or innovation) and a need to satisfy the desire for meaning in complex open systems such as the Civic Space. The greater majority of people express three successive comments when participating in Civic Forums. The first is, "I don't know where to start," the second, "I don't know how to start," and the third, "I don't know what to do."

Figure 8. Pathway to Experience in the Civic Space

The tables below (Figure 9. Characteristics of people in the Civic Space, and Figure 10. Intervention actions) outline a few typical characteristics of people in the Civic Space, how individuals behave in open, complex systems without clear pathways and solutions to connect their ideas to social capital, resources and capabilities, and remedial actions to re-direct attention and activity.

Characteristics of people in the Civic Space

Psychological, Behaviour Circumstances Affects Activity Intervention Remedial

Sociological question(s) Action

Suffering from a Frustration, High, low, no High stress Low to no What are you Contribute

lack of social anger, social levels; creativity passionate an interview

capital; deficit of passive; connectivity; health and about? What to I-Open

experience in depressed; recurring problems; innovation would you like research;

cultivating social manic; financial low to no people to Participate in

networks; no irrational; problems resilience know, think, Civic Forum,

experience apathy associated with feel and do? COINS

collaborating; no poverty often What do you education;

habit of engaging overwhelming, see for the Participate in

in community devastating, future? Strategic

impassable Doing

Figure 9. Characteristics of people in the Civic Space

Intervention actions to re-direct attention and results that build trust and participation over time

Comment Intervention questions Organizing actions Results Adoption and Contributions

"I don't know where to start" What are you passionate about? What would you like people to know, think, feel and do? What do you see for the future? Contribute an interview to I-Open research Organizing affect; develops rational relational context; builds self-worth & value Increasing self worth; increasing hopefulness; insights; stories of innovation

"I don't know how to start" What is your idea? Who do you envision with you? What would that take? How long would that take? Participate in Civic Forum; COINS; Innovation Framework; OSED basics Habits of leadership; engage in community based critical thinking; strategy concepts May consider leading a Civic Forum; will engage others; participate in a project or cause on some level

"I don't know what to do" Who would you like to connect to who you are not? What is the system you see? What are the connections and where are the gaps? Build your network; host a conversation; write a white paper with others; begin a project; commit to a Strategic Doing cycle Higher levels of social capital; higher levels of hope & self-worth, higher level of trust; higher levels of strategic thinking Will consider leading a Civic Forum with others; will commit to working on a project outside of the Civic Forum; commitment to lead a Civic Forum; lead a series of Civic Forums with others over a period of time toward a predefined goal

Figure 10. Intervention actions

I-Open Collaborative Communities

(Figure 11. I-Open Collaborative Communities) Characteristics

considered in reviewing the following samples include level of innovation, collaboration, communication,

creative intelligence, ethical conscience, knowledge sharing, elements of swarm creativity, code of ethics, trust networks, evidence of meritocracy, consistency, and transparency. Clearly, there is more study to be done.

Model: a platform for civic engagement to build networks, advance innovation and enterprise Example: Tuesdays@REI Description: a no charge, weekly civic forum convened from September 9, 2003 to June 25, 2005 from 4PM to 5:45PM at the Weatherhead School of Management, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio at the Frank Gehry designed building. Over a seventeen-month period approximately 100 forums engaged civic, business, government, academic, foundation, organization leaders in open, guided conversations focused on innovation relevant to communities and their regions. Branded communications and 'framed' conversations co-created by the Civic Forum leader were developed. These efforts produced an opt-in only reader list of approximately 3000 people from a twenty-two county region generating

over 80,000 media impressions. Conversations were lead by people about their ideas in what is known as "guided conversations" (different from facilitated) focused on the person and their idea encouraging a culture advancing civility, morals, collaborative leadership, discussion, engaging differences of opinion, strategizing, Futuring, acceptance of ambiguity, and questioning concluding with asking, "What's next?" Some framed examples: "Creative Industries & Global Innovation," "Workforce Development: Building Skills and Services through Networks" and "Arts & Arts Technology: How They are Applied in Economic Contexts." Discussions focused on visioning future solutions to education, economic, and workforce development as they bring value to the Innovation Framework, what is known and not known, and next steps needed to reverse engineer innovative solutions. Civic Forums catalyze "Strategic Doing", a simple, but disciplined process of moving ideas to action in the form of diverse working groups, white papers, initiatives, and new businesses for enterprise collaboration. A large civic network grew (functioning strongly today) and many new enterprises were established as a result, small and large. Tuesdays@REI were managed by one full time staff person at a cost of approximately $.60 per participant. Outcomes focused on education, economic, and workforce development included: a multi-generation wiki to share information, several topic specific weblogs, high-level industry system maps were published, a creative art and business student group, the identification of a previously unrealized local preventative health care industry, and several sustainable industry projects, networks, and enterprises focused on energy, Biofuels, green building,

Figure 11. I-Open Collaborative Communities

technology, to name a few. Some of the barriers we experienced included the lack of on campus parking; low to no levels of on-campus academic, administrative, and student support or participation; no communication support from the host University; no local and global resource and capability networks for support of projects; local culture with low to no level of collaboration; in general, a lack of perception of value to the activities as they pertain to networks, collaboration, and regional innovation.

Model: a platform for regional engagement for education, economic, and workforce development

Example: North Central Indiana Workforce for Innovation in Regional Economic Development (WIRED),

an initiative of the U.S. Department of Labor

Related materials: http://www.scribd.com/doc/13347086/NCI-WIRED-Success-Story-Power-Point-123108 Features:

Activities started in 2006

2008 activities generated 50 initiatives

One full time staff person

College, university, organization, government, business collaborations Public-private partnerships created

Dollars and in-kind services leveraged to generate above and beyond proposed activity Social, resource and capability networks constructed

Model: a platform for building open innovation networks focused on creativity, technology, energy, food, water, land, and health care Example: Midtown Brews Features:

Spinout of "Midtown Mornings", a spinout of "Midtown Wednesdays", a spinout of Tuesdays@REI Activities began July 6, 2006 to July 9, 2009 36 civic forum conversations

Broadcast, archived, transcribed interviews and conversations

100 interviews contributed

Co-hosted by local technology companies

Generated considerable social capital, collaborative leadership, enterprise projects, participation Collaborative leadership contributed by the network Logistic responsibilities shared

Civic, business, government, academic leaders sharing insights, early industry innovation, discussing enterprise opportunities and solutions pertaining to social and economic issues One time grant, City of Cleveland for $7500 Community pizza purchase supported through donations

Model: a collaborative network empowering enterprise development for women and young girls

Example: Women's Enterprise Network

Features:

Activities started August 2008 through July 2009 Broadcast conversations with live chat Intergenerational leadership, participation

Hosted by local coffee house; community library; retirement living center In-kind contribution support

Conversation topics community generated focused on a woman's perspective on economic development with a focus on democracy, careers, leadership, and business development

Branded communications leverage artistic graphics and online web interactivity to sustain and amplify community collaboration and culture. Graphics, copy development, communication style, tone, and phrasing affect the attention and learning of readers. Branded communications and the "framing" of Civic Forum conversations aligned with the investment categories of the Innovation Framework help people to understand how their ideas are valuable and fit into the larger scheme of education, economic, and workforce development. Copy development focuses on describing the intent of the idea to be discussed; it's relationship to a category of the Innovation Framework; it's

description in terms of topic; and next step opportunities as they relate to enterprise development. Regular, consistent communications based on people and their ideas engage and educate people over time.

Figure 12. Communication Design and Social Media Architecture

architecture.

Communication Design and Social Media Architecture

(Figure 12. Communication Design and Social Media Architecture) Many types of social media tools are adopted in a continuous flow of creative experiments to share information, attract, and influence audiences. Civic Forum communications are informed by interview information and research with an educational focus. Interviews and conversations are broadcast live, engage in comment, and archived for public posting. Posts are announced on many different social media platforms to their communities. Announcements are connected, pointing to each other for redundancy, for the purpose of amplifying and sustaining news and information, and to develop brand and culture. This requires a flexible, high-level approach to organization of operations and activity, combined whenever possible, with personal comment and response to live on-line community commentary. This is an inexpensive, disciplined, fast way to build awareness,

community, participation, and harvest collective intelligence for innovation and design. I-Open is beginning to collect data to understand metrics and improve

A Civic Forum Network (Figure 13. A Civic Forum Network) This thought paper summarizes and refers to examples of Open Source Economic Development in the Civic Space from August 2003 to July 2009 for the purpose of exploring current social and economic issues in education, economic, and workforce development affected by local, national, and global sustainability. This review invites contributions to the design of an accelerated networked model of Civic Forums to create knowledge and enterprise solutions for those issues. We propose the integration of: COINS and CONDOR to fine-tune efforts to accelerate creativity, elevate ingenuity, and strengthen participation; Question Science, to form the best questions possible to clearly articulate insights, critical thinking, inquiry, focus

conversation, and knowledge creation for a practical model to serve research for the emerging Science of Collaboration.

Figure 13. A Civic Forum Network

Conclusion

(Figure 14. COINS in the Civic Space)

Civic Forums are more than a mechanism for network building and place-based innovation; they are a knowing, a culture of thinking, feeling and doing based on generating the very best ideas to design sustainable solutions to global issues. Our shared opportunity is to build an advanced networked model of Civic Forums in the Civic Space, accelerated by COINS for research in the emerging Science of Collaboration. By engaging people, colleges, universities, and libraries and connecting valuable legacy assets, we can advance knowledge creation for enterprise development in education, economic, and workforce development.

Building social capital in the Civic Space to drive innovation and prosperity needs not only the ideas and inspirations of all people, but adoption of higher levels of organization, process, and tools if we are to succeed in generating the quality, depth, and frequency of innovation at the rate needed to address the really big problems of the world. In addition, this will require everyone working together at regular, higher levels of collaboration.

References

Gloor, Peter A. (2006). Swarm Creativity: Competitive Advantage through Collaborative Innovation Networks. New York: Oxford University Press, Inc.

PAPERS

Merkel, B., Morrison, E., Altshuler, A. and Coughlin, D. (2007) "Civic Forums as an Economic Development Tool," The Institute for Open Economic Networks (I-Open) http://www.scribd.com/doc/17180205/Civic-Forum-White-Paper-Final

Morrison, Ed. (2008) "An Introduction to Open Source Economic Development: Thriving on the new economic development frontier"

http://publishing.yudu.com/Library/Auwsy/IntroductontoOpenSou/resources/index.htm?referrerUrl=http%3A%2F% 2Fbeta.yudu.com%2Fitem%2Fdetails%2F19346%2FIntroducton-to-Open-Source-Economic-Development

Morrison, Ed. (2009) A. "Re-Employment Networks," Re-Employment Summit. Baltimore, MD. Purdue Center for Regional Development, The University of Akron, The Institute for Open Economic Networks (I-Open), Center for Innovation and Regional Economic Development

Figure 14. COINS in the Civic Space

www.workforceflorida. com/.. ./090710_Re-employment_Workshop_Slides_Morrison v2%5B 1 %5D.pdf

Morrison, Ed. (2009) b. "Open Source Economic Development: Accelerating Innovation Through Collaboration," Purdue Center for Regional Development, April 2009 http://www.scribd.com/doc/13500451/Reemployment-Networks-White-Paper-v2

Morrison, Ed. And Gavigan, T. (2009) "A New Workforce Development System for a Green Economy." Purdue Center for Regional Development, Center for Education Innovation and Regional Economic Development http://www.scribd.com/doc/12952856/Purdue-Ed-Morrison

ARTICLES

LaDuke, Bruce. (2009) "Integral Futuring: A Process Approach to Knowledge Advance" http://www.scribd.com/doc/18418628/Bruce-LaDuke-123108-Interview

Maslow, Abraham Harold http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abraham_Maslow

Merkel, B. (2009) a. "I-Open Collaborative Communities"

http://i-open-2.strategy-nets.net/news/2009/1/22/i-open-collaborative-communities-jan-2009

Merkel, B. (2009) b. "I-Open interview and conversation research" http://i-open-2.strategy-nets.net/wiki/interview-and-conversation-research

Baker, Dean. (2009) "Unemployment Rate Climbs to 9.8 Percent, Wage Growth Weakens" Center for Economic and Policy Research

http://www.cepr.net/index.php/data-bytes/jobs-bytes/decreased-jobs-hours/ REPORTS

Workforce Innovation in Regional Economic Development (WIRED) (2009)

- North Central Indiana WIRED Network, Purdue University, Quarterly Narrative Progress Report Q1, 2009

- North Central Indiana WIRED Network, Purdue University, Quarterly Narrative Progress Report Q4, 2009 Indiana WIRED http://www.indiana-wired.net/

Crawford, S. (2009) I-Open Meaning Maps http://i-open-2.strategy-nets.net/wiki/meaning-map

TABLES AND MATRICES

Medvick, Richard. (2005) "Energy to Happiness" http://i-open-2.strategy-nets.net/file/show/energytohappiness-4.xls

Merkel, B. (2005) "Tuesdays@REI Tracking Sheet" http://i-open-2.strategy-nets.net/file/show/tues-rei-matrix.xls

I-OPEN COLLABORATIVE COMMUNITIES

The Institute for Open Economic Networks (I-Open) http://i-open-2.strategy-nets.net/overview/welcome

Midtown Brews http://midtownbrews.net/news

Women's Enterprise Network

http://womensenterprisenetwork.net/overview/welcome