Scholarly article on topic 'Protective Mechanical Ventilation, Why Use It?'

Protective Mechanical Ventilation, Why Use It? Academic research paper on "Health sciences"

CC BY-NC-ND
0
0
Share paper
Academic journal
Brazilian Journal of Anesthesiology
OECD Field of science
Keywords
{"Respiration / Artificial" / "Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury" / "Pulmonary Atelectasis" / "Positive Pressure Respiration" / "COMPLICAÇÕES: Atelectasia" / "EQUIPAMENTOS: Sistema respiratório / ventilador" / "VENTILAÇÃO: Generalidades" / "COMPLICACIONES: Atelectasia" / "EQUIPOS: Sistema respiratorio / Ventilador" / "VENTILACIÓN: Generalidades"}

Abstract of research paper on Health sciences, author of scientific article — Emerson Seiberlich, Jonas Alves Santana, Renata de Andrade Chaves, Raquel Carvalho Seiberlich

Summary Background and objectives Mechanical ventilation (MV) strategies have been modified over the last decades with a tendency for increasingly lower tidal volumes (VT). However, in patients without acute lung injury (ALI) or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) the use of high VTs is still very common. Retrospective studies suggest that this practice can be related to mechanical ventilation-associated ALI. The objective of this review is to search for evidence to guide protective MV in patients with healthy lungs and to suggest strategies to properly ventilate lungs with ALI/ARDS. Contents A review based on the main articles that focus on the use of strategies of mechanical ventilation was performed. Conclusions Consistent studies to determine which would be the best way to ventilate a patient with healthy lungs are lacking. Expert recommendations and current evidence presented in this article indicate that the use of a VT lower than 10mL.kg−1, associated with positive endexpiratory pressure (PEEP) ≥ 5cmH2O without exceeding a pressure plateau of 15 to 20cmH2O could minimize alveolar stretching at the end of inspiration and avoid possible inflammation or alveolar collapse.

Academic research paper on topic "Protective Mechanical Ventilation, Why Use It?"

Rev Bras Anestesio! REVIEW ARTICLE

2011; 61: 5: 659-667

Protective Mechanical Ventilation, Why Use It?

Emerson Seiberlich, TSA 1, Jonas Alves Santana 2, Renata de Andrade Chaves 2, Raquel Carvalho Seiberlich 3

Summary: Seiberlich E, Santana JA, Chaves RA, Seiberlich RC - Protective Mechanical Ventilation, Why Use It?

Background and objectives: Mechanical ventilation (MV) strategies have been modified over the last decades with a tendency for increasingly lower tidal volumes (VT). However, in patients without acute lung injury (ALI) or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) the use of high VTs is still very common. Retrospective studies suggest that this practice can be related to mechanical ventilation-associated ALI. The objective of this review is to search for evidence to guide protective MV in patients with healthy lungs and to suggest strategies to properly ventilate lungs with ALI/ARDS.

Contents: A review based on the main articles that focus on the use of strategies of mechanical ventilation was performed.

Conclusions: Consistent studies to determine which would be the best way to ventilate a patient with healthy lungs are lacking. Expert recommendations and current evidence presented in this article indicate that the use of a VT lower than 10 mL.kg-1, associated with positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) > 5 cmH2O without exceeding a pressure plateau of 15 to 20 cmH2O could minimize alveolar stretching at the end of inspiration and avoid possible inflammation or alveolar collapse.

Keywords: Respiration, Artificial; Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury; Pulmonary Atelectasis; Positive Pressure Respiration.

©2011 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

INTRODUCTION

Mechanical ventilation (MV) strategies have been modified over the last decades with a tendency to use increasingly lower tidal volumes (VT) especially in patients with acute lung injury (ALI) or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, in patients without ALI/ARDS the use of high VT is still very common. Retrospective studies suggest that the use of this practice can be related to mechanical ventilation-induced ALI 1. Due to the lack of consistent prospective studies the ideal management of MV in patients without ALI remains unknown. The objective of this review is to search for scientific evidence to guide protective MV for patients with healthy lungs and to suggest strategies to adequately ventilate lungs with ARDS.

Received from CET/SBA of IPSEMG, Belo Horizonte, Brazil.

1. Anesthesiologist; Instructor of the CET/SBA of IPSEMG; Anesthesiologist of Hospital SOCOR; Anesthesiologist of Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG); Anesthesiologist of Hospital Vera Cruz Belo Horizonte

2. R3 of the CET/SBA of IPSEMG

3. Respiratory Physiotherapist; Physiotherapist of Hospital Mater Dei Belo Horizonte;

Physiotherapist of CTI Neonatal of Hospital Odilon Behrens de Belo Horizonte

Submitted on August 24, 2010. Approved on January 31, 2011.

Correspondence to:

Dr. Emerson Seiberlich

Rua Bernardo Guimaraes 2.138/1.101

Lourdes

30140082 - Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil

E-mail: seiberlich@gmail.com

ALI AND ARDS

Acute lung injury was first described in 1967 by Ashbaugh 2, and it is characterized by refractory hypoxemia, diffuse infiltrates on chest X-ray, and absence of evidence of increased left atrial pressure. Acute respiratory distress syndrome represents the most severe form of ALI. In 1994, the American-European Consensus Conference on ARDS 3 defined the criteria for the diagnosis of ALI/ARDS currently used (Box 1).

The etiology of ALI and ARDS varies (Box 2). Mortality ranges from 25% to 40% 5-7, and may reach 58% in ARDS 8. The etiology of ARDS influences the prognosis, and sepsis is the condition associated with higher mortality. Other factors that influence mortality include age, degree of organ dysfunction, immunosuppression, chronic liver disease, and severity score (SAPS II - Simplified Acute Physiological Score II) 8-10, and the higher the number of associated clinical factors, greater the mortality. Furthermore, among patients who survive an episode of ARDS, approximately one third would develop chronic lung disease with restrictive or obstructive pattern 11.

PATHOPHYSIOLOGY OF ALI/ARDS

The progression of ALI/ARDS can be divided into two phases. The first, the exudative phase, is associated with diffuse alveolar damage with formation of a protein-rich edema in the alveoli and alveolar interstitium resulting in hypoxemia and reduction of pulmonary complacency.

The alveolar-capillary membrane (ACM) is formed by vascular endothelium and alveolar epithelial cells (type I pneu-mocytes). It separates the alveolus from the pulmonary capillary blood working as a "barrier" that prevents the leakage

Box 1 - Definition of ALI and ARDS 4 Acute injury of a suggestive etiology

Severe hypoxemia: PaO2/FiO2 < 200 mmHg for ARDS, and

< 300 mmHg for ALI

Absence of cardiac failure: wedge pressure < 18 mmHg and CVP

< 4 mmHg

Diffuse bilateral infiltrates on chest X-ray

ALI: acute lung injury; ARDS: acute respiratory distress syndrome; PaO2: arterial oxygen pressure; FiO2: inspired oxygen fraction; CVP: central venous pressure; PCWP: pulmonary capillary wedge pressure.

Box 2 - Etiology of ALI/ARDS 4 Direct injury factors

Pulmonary infection

Aspiration of gastric contents

Non-fatal drowning

Toxic gas inhalation

Hyperoxia

Lung contusion

Indirect injury factors

Sepsis/SIRS

Severe non-thoracic trauma

TRALI or massive transfusion

Cardiopulmonary bypass

Pancreatitis

ALI: acute lung injury; ARDS: acute respiratory distress syndrome; SIRS: systemic inflammatory response syndrome; TRALI: transfusion-related acute lung injury.

of intravascular fluid to the alveolar space. During the exudative phase the breakdown in intercellular junctions compromises the "barrier" function 12, resulting in deposition of fibrin and formation of intra-alveolar hyaline membrane.

The magnitude of the alveolar damage in ARDS results from an imbalance between the pro-inflammatory and antiinflammatory responses in face of the initial injury. Both direct (pulmonary) and indirect (extra-pulmonary) aggressions induce the release of humoral and cellular inflammatory mediators. Activation of monocytes and macrophages by primary cytokines, tumor necrosis factor a (TNF-a) and interleukin (IL) 1-p culminates with the release of secondary cytokines and other mediators that lead to a systemic inflammatory response and the release of proteolytic and oxidizing enzymes. The final result is the dysfunction and death of alveolar epithelial cells.

The second phase of ALI/ARDS is known as fibroprolifera-tive, and it is associated with fast proliferation of type II pneu-mocytes and fibroblasts. The actions of fibroblasts result in deposition of collagen and proteoglycans in the hyaline membrane reducing pulmonary complacency and increasing the pathological dead space. The pulmonary capillary bed can be

obstructed leading to pulmonary hypertension and dysfunction of right cardiac chambers.

PROTECTIVE MV IN ALI AND ARDS

In a pioneer study comparing mechanical ventilation strategies in patients with ALI/ARDS, Ranieri et al. 1314 found that the use of smaller tidal volumes reduces the concentration of inflammatory mediator both in bronchoalveolar washing fluid and systemic circulation. Other studies confirmed that this practice would alter the final outcome of these patients 15-17.

In the main study, the ARDs Network 18, the use of low (6 mL.kg-1 of predictive body weight) and high (12 mL.kg-1 of predictive body weight) tidal volumes were compared. The use of low VT with a maximum plateau pressure of 30 cmH2O resulted in a lower intra-hospital mortality (31% versus 39%) and a lower number of days on mechanical ventilation. The benefit in patient survival remained after a 6-month follow-up.

A new study of the ARDS Network 19 undertaken four years later assessed the use of high positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) (13.2 ± 3.5 cmH2O) versus low PEEP (8.3 ± 3.2 cmH2O) in patients with ARDS on protective ventilation (6 mL.kg-1 of predictive weight and plateau pressure < 30 cmH2O). A significant statistical difference in mortality, number of days on mechanical ventilation, or degree of organ dysfunction was not observed between groups.

During the use of protective ventilation in ARDS the development of hypercapnia and respiratory acidosis may be expected as part of this approach. This change when foreseen is called permissive hypercapnia. In an attempt to compensate for these changes one can try using more elevated respiratory rates. The fall in pH up to 7.15 is usually well tolerated with none or small changes in cardiac output and blood pressure 5 20. Situations in which permissive hypercapnia may be harmful include intracranial hypertension, severe concomitant metabolic acidosis, severe pulmonary hypertension, right ventricular failure, and coronary syndromes.

The use of mechanical ventilation in the prone position in ARDS seems to improve oxygenation and alveolar recruitment, but benefits on mortality have not been observed 21. The prone position improves the ventilation/perfusion ratio if the most compromised alveolar units are in the dependent position. Note that ventilation in this position leads to inadvertent extubation and loss of venous accesses.

Recommendations for protective ventilation in patients with ARDS are summarized in Box 3.

OXYGEN TOXICITY

Human and animal studies suggest that the administration of supplementary oxygen (O2) may lead to different aspects of airways injuries. The effects of hyperoxia in the lungs have been known for some time. It has been demonstrated that it causes the formation of alveolar hyaline membrane, edema, hyperplasia, proliferation of type II pneumocytes, destruction

PROTECTIVE MECHANICAL VENTILATION, WHY USE IT?

Box 3 - Guidelines for protective ventilation in patients with ALI/ARDS 22

Pressure-controlled or volume-controlled mode demonstrated the same efficacy in this population. The experience of the physician and the correct interpretation of physiologic changes are the most important elements when choosing the ventilation mode.

Reduction of the tidal volume until approximately 6 mL.kg-1 of predictive body weight; maintaining a pressure plateau < 30 cmH2O reduces mortality and it is strongly recommended (ARDS NETWORK 2000).

Increasing PEEP in an attempt to reduce FiO2 is not supported by current studies. Animal studies suggest the use of high PEEP to avoid pulmonary derecruitment, but how to define the optimal values for this purpose has not been elucidated. Recruitment maneuvers seem to be a possibility for patients who respond to elevated PEEP levels, but they are not indicated in all patients.

Careful hemodynamic monitoring should be maintained in patients in protective mechanical ventilation due to the risk of compromising tissue perfusion by adjusting those parameters.

Hypercapnia due to protective mechanical ventilation (permissive hypercapnia) is usually well tolerated and it is more desirable than the use of elevated tidal volumes or elevated plateau pressures.

Contraindications to permissive hypercapnia include intracranial hypertension, concomitant severe metabolic acidosis, worsening pulmonary hypertension, right ventricular failure, and acute coronary syndromes 4._

ALI: acute lung injury; ARDS: acute respiratory distress syndrome; PEEP: positive end-expiratory pressure; FiO2: inspired oxygen fraction.

of type I pneumocytes, interstitial fibrosis, and pulmonary vascular remodeling. The formation of reactive oxygen species in mitochondria is regarded as the main cause of the diffuse alveolar damage seen in animals exposed to high fractions of inspired oxygen 21. In studies of humans with lung diseases it is difficult to define the role of this toxicity when facing so many variables. However, in the study of the ARDS Network mentioned above 19, which compared high PEEP versus low PEEP, the 273 patients with ARDs ventilated with low PEEP required higher FiO2 when compared to those ventilated with high PEEP (n = 276) according to the protocol proposed by the investigators. However, a statistically significant difference in mortality before and after discharge from the hospital and secondary outcomes was not observed. Note that that study was not designed to evaluate the outcome as a function of the FiO2 values but of PEEP values.

MECHANICAL VENTILATION-RELATED ALI/ARDS

Previously, lung damage attributed to elevated VTs was described as a possibility of air extravasation into the pleural space. When extravasation occurs due to very elevated pressure in the airways it characterizes barotrauma. More recently, other forms of MV-associated damages have been described. Volutrauma results from alveolar hyperdistension leading to a local inflammatory process. Atelectrauma is a consequence of the alveolar injury caused by stress on the ACM when facing an instable recruitment/derecruitment at each ventilatory cycle. Biotrauma is caused by the local and systemic inflam-

matory responses resulting from aggression caused by both volutrauma and atelectrauma or the combination of both 24.

Animal studies revealed that the use of high VTs in healthy lungs leads rapidly to pulmonary changes similar to those seen in ARDS. The injury cause by MV results in alveolar damage with consequent edema of the alveolar-capillary membrane, release of inflammatory mediators in the systemic circulation, and activation and dislocation of inflammatory cells into the alveoli 1.

The deleterious effects of high VTs have been observed even in patients ventilated for a short time. Fernadez et al. 25 collected the intraoperative VTs of patients undergoing pneu-monectomies. According to them, 18% of patients developed postoperative acute respiratory failure (ARF), and in half of these cases patients received the diagnosis of ALI/ARDS. After analyzing the data they observed that patients who were ventilated with higher VTs (mean of 8.3 x 6.7 mL.kg-1 of ideal body weight, p < 0.0001) developed ARF. Logistic regression analysis identified the use of high intraoperative VTs and higher intravascular fluid replacement as risk factors for postoperative ARF.

On a study of 52 patients, Mechelet et al. 26 compared in-terleukins levels, IL-1, IL-6, and IL-8 in patients undergoing esophagectomies to treat cancer, ventilated with conventional MV (VT 9 mL.kg-1 of ideal body weight without PEEP) and protective MV (VT 5 mL.kg-1 of ideal body weight and PEEP of 5 cmH2O). Patients who were on protective MV had lower levels of inflammatory factors both at the end of monopulmo-nary ventilation and 18 hours after surgery. Protective MV also resulted in better PaO2/FiO2 ratio during monopulmonary ventilation and 1 hour after surgery in addition a reduction in postoperative MV time.

A randomized clinical assay 27 with surgical patients admitted to the ICU compared VT of 12 and 6 mL.kg-1 of ideal body weight. Patients on the postoperative period of neurosurgery and cardiac surgery were excluded. Patients ventilated with lower VTs had fewer infections, less time of MV, and a shorter stay on the ICU.

The Third Brazilian Consensus on Mechanical Ventilation 28, published in 2007, mentions intraoperative mechanical ventilation in patients without lung disease, and recommends the use of PEEP > 5 cmH2O during general anesthesia (degree of recommendation B), alveolar recruitment maneuvers (degree of recommendation B), FiO2 between 30% and 40% or the lower FiO2 to maintain oxygen saturation above 98% (degree of recommendation C), and not using high tidal volumes 28.

A recent study by Soubhie et al. 29, published on the Brazilian Journal of Anesthesiology, evaluated transoperative ventilatory modalities used by anesthesiologists in Brazil through a questionnaire. They demonstrated that 94% routinely use PEEP while 86.5% use FiO2 between 40% and 60%. Intraoperative alveolar recruitment maneuvers were performed by 78.4%, but only 30% used protective mechanical ventilation with VT lower than 7 mL.kg-1.

It should be emphasized that the expression "low VT" should in reality be "normal VT" since mammals usually have

a VT of approximately 6.3 mL.kg-1. In most studies tidal volume is calculated based on the predictive body weight whose variables are the gender and height of the patient. This is very important to avoid over- or underestimating the calculated VT for MV (Box 4) 1.

Box 4 - Calculation of predictive body weight in kilograms (kg) 1

CONCLUSION

Consistent studies to determine which would be the ideal ventilation mode for a patient with healthy lungs are lacking. Expert recommendations and current evidence presented here indicate the use of a VT lower than 10 mL.kg-1 of ideal body

weight associated with PEEP > 5 cmH2O, without exceeding a plateau of 15 to 20 cmH2O, would minimize end-inspiratory alveolar stretching and avoid possible inflammation or alveolar collapse.

It is important to emphasize that in some patients with healthy lungs exposed to MV for a short period for low risk procedures a VT of 10 mL.kg-1 may not cause end-inspiratory alveolar stretching, and therefore it does not have the consequences mentioned. On the contrary, when these patients are ventilated with a pressure plateau < 15 cmH2O without PEEP the use of low VTs can lead to atelectasis. A high enough PEEP should be used in these cases to avoid this occurrence and possible oxygenation compromise. The same does not happen to patients breathing spontaneously. In this case even with low pressure plateau transalveolar pressure maintains the "negative" pleural pressure avoiding alveolar collapse.

Male gender Female gender

50 + 0.91 x (height in centimeters - 152.4) 45.5 + 0.91 x (height in centimeters - 152.4)

Rev Bras Anestesio! 2011; 61: 5: 659-667

ARTIGO DE REVISÄO

Ventilagáo Mecánica Protetora, Por Que Utilizar?

Emerson Seiberlich, TSA 1, Jonas Alves Santana 2, Renata de Andrade Chaves 2, Raquel Carvalho Seiberlich 3

Resumo: Seiberlich E, Santana JA, Chaves RA, Seiberlich RC - Ventilagáo Mecánica Protetora, Por Que Utilizar?

Justificativa e objetivos: As estratégias de ventilagáo mecánica (VM) vém sofrendo modificagoes nas últimas décadas, com tendencia ao uso de volumes correntes (VC) cada vez menores. Porém, em pacientes sem lesáo pulmonar aguda (LPA) ou SARA (síndrome da angústia respiratoria do adulto), o uso de VC altos ainda é muito comum. Estudos retrospectivos sugerem que o uso dessa prática pode estar relacionado a LPA associada a ventilagáo mecánica. O objetivo desta revisáo é buscar evidencias científicas que norteiem uma VM protetora para pacientes com pulmoes sadios e sugerir estratégias para ventilar adequadamente um pulmáo com LPA/SARA.

Conteúdo: Realizou-se revisáo com base nos principais artigos que englobam o uso de estratégias de ventilagáo mecánica.

Conclusoes: Ainda faltam estudos consistentes para que se determine qual seria a melhor maneira de ventilar um paciente com pulmáo sadio. As recomendagoes dos especialistas e as atuais evidencias apresentadas neste artigo indicam que o uso de um VC inferior a 10 mL.kg-1 de peso corporal ideal, associado a pressáo expiratória final positiva (PEEP) > 5 cmH2O e sem ultrapassar uma pressáo de plato de 15 a 20 cmH2O, poderia minimizar o estiramento alveolar no final da inspiragáo e evitar possível inflamagáo ou colabamento alveolar.

Unitermos: COMPLICAQÓES: Atelectasia; EQUIPAMENTOS: Sistema respiratorio, ventilador; VENTILAQÁO: Generalidades.

©2011 Elsevier Editora Ltda. Todos os direitos reservados.

INTRODUQÁO

As estratégias de ventilagáo mecánica (VM) vém sofrendo modificagáo nas últimas décadas, com tendéncia ao uso de volumes correntes (VC) cada vez menores, principalmente em pacientes com lesáo pulmonar aguda (LPA) ou síndrome da angústia respiratoria do adulto (SARA). Porém, em pacientes sem LPA/SARA, o uso de VC altos ainda é muito comum. Estudos retrospectivos sugerem que o uso dessa prática pode estar relacionado á LPA associada á ventilagáo mecánica 1. Devido á falta de estudos prospectivos consistentes, o manejo ideal da VM em pacientes sem LPA permanece desconhe-cido. O objetivo desta revisáo é buscar evidéncias científicas que norteiem uma VM protetora para pacientes com pulmöes sadios e sugerir estratégias para ventilagáo adequada de um pulmáo com SARA.

Recebido de CET/SBA do IPSEMG, Belo Horizonte, Brasil.

1. Anestesiologista; Instrutor do CET/SBA do IPSEMG; Anestesiologista do Hospital SOCOR; Anestesiologista do Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG); Anestesiologista do Hospital Vera Cruz Belo Horizonte

2. ME3 do CET/SBA do IPSEMG

3. Especialista em Fisioterapia Respiratória; Fisioterapeuta do Hospital Mater Dei Belo

Horizonte; Fisioterapeuta do CTI Neonatal do Hospital Odilon Behrens de Belo Horizonte

Submetido em 24 de agosto de 2010.

Aprovado para publicagäo em 31 de janeiro de 2011.

Correspondéncia para:

Dr. Emerson Seiberlich

Rua Bernardo Guimaríes 2.138/1.101

Lourdes

30140-082 - BeloHorizonte, MG, Brasil E-mail: seiberlich@gmail.com

LPA E SARA

A LPA foi primeiramente descrita em 1967 por Ashbaugh 2 e é caracterizada por hipoxemia refratária, infiltrado difuso á radiografia de tórax e auséncia de evidéncias de pressöes de átrio esquerdo aumentadas. A SARA representa a forma mais grave de LPA. Em 1994, o consenso da conferéncia americano-europeia sobre SARA 3 definiu os critérios para o diagnóstico de LPA/SARA que sáo utilizados atualmente (Quadro 1).

LPA e SARA podem ter etiologia das mais diversas (Quadro 2). A mortalidade pode variar em torno de 25% a 40% 5-7, podendo chegar a 58% na SARA 8. A etiologia da SARA influencia no prognóstico, sendo sepse a condigáo associada com maior mortalidade. Outros fatores que influenciam a mortalidade sáo idade, grau de disfungáo de órgáos, imunossupressáo, doenga hepática crónica e pontuagáo em escore de gravidade (SAPS II - Simplified Acute Physiological Score II) 8-10. Quanto maior o número de fatores clínicos associados, maior será a mortalidade. Além disso, dentre pacientes que sobrevi-vem a um episódio de SARA, aproximadamente um tergo de-senvolve doenga pulmonar crónica com distúrbios de padráo restritivos ou obstrutivos 11.

FISIOPATOLOGIA DA LPA/SARA

A LPA/SARA pode ter sua progressáo dividida em duas fases. A primeira, a fase exsudativa, está associada a dano difuso alveolar com formagáo de edema rico em proteína no alvéolo e no interstício alveolar, o que resulta em hipoxemia e redugáo da complacéncia pulmonar.

Quadro 1 - Definigáo de LPA e SARA 4 Lesáo aguda de etiologia sugestiva

Hipoxemia grave: PaO2/FiO2 < 200 mmHg para SARA e < 300 mmHg para LPA

Ausencia de insuficiencia cardíaca: PCP < 18 mmHg ou PVC < 4 mmHg

Infiltrado difuso bilateral na radiografia de tórax_

LPA: lesáo pulmonar aguda; SARA: síndrome da angústia respiratória do adulto; PaO2: pressáo arterial de oxigenio; FiO2: fragáo inspirada de oxigenio; PCV: pressáo venosa central; PCP: pressáo capilar pulmonar.

Quadro 2 - Etiologia da LPA/SARA 4 Fatores de lesáo direta

Infecgáo pulmonar Aspiragáo de conteúdo gástrico Afogamento náo fatal Inalagáo de gás tóxico Hiperóxia

Contusáo pulmonar

Fatores de lesáo indireta

Sepse/SIRS

Trauma náo torácico grave TRALI ou transfusáo maciga Bypass cardiopulmonar Pancreatite Queimaduras

Choque_

LPA: lesáo pulmonar aguda; SARA: síndrome da angústia respiratória do adulto; SIRS: síndrome da resposta inflamatória sistemica; TRALI: lesáo pulmonar aguda relacionada a transfusáo.

A membrana alvéolo-capilar (MAC) é formada por endo-télio vascular e células epiteliais alveolares (pneumócitos do tipo I). Ela separa o alvéolo do sangue capilar pulmonar e funciona como uma "barreira" que previne o vazamento do fluido intravascular para o espago alveolar. Durante a fase exsuda-tiva, as estreitas jungoes intercelulares se alargam e a fungáo de "barreira" fica comprometida 12, resultando em deposigáo de fibrina e formagáo da membrana hialina intra-alveolar.

A magnitude do dano alveolar na SARA resulta de um desequilibrio entre a resposta proinflamatória e anti-inflamató-ria diante de um insulto inicial. Tanto as agressoes diretas (pulmonares) quanto indiretas (extrapulmonares) induzem a liberagáo de mediadores inflamatórios humorais e celulares. A ativagáo dos monócitos e macrófagos pelas citocinas pri-márias, fator de necrose tumoral a (TNF-a) e interleucina (IL) 1-p, culmina com a liberagáo de citocinas secundárias e de outros mediadores que levam a uma resposta inflamatória sistemica e liberagáo de enzimas proteolíticas e oxidantes. O resultado final é a disfungáo e a morte das células epiteliais alveolares.

A segunda fase da LPA/SARA é chamada fase fibroproli-ferativa e está associada a uma rápida proliferagáo dos pneu-mócitos do tipo II e fibroblastos. A agáo dos fibroblastos resulta em deposigáo de colágeno e proteoglicanos na membrana hialina, o que diminui a complacencia pulmonar e aumenta o

espago morto patológico. O leito capilar pulmonar pode ser obstruído, levando a hipertensáo pulmonar e disfungáo de cámaras cardíacas direitas.

VM PROTETORA NA LPA E SARA

Em estudo pioneiro na comparagáo entre estratégias de ventilagáo mecánica em pacientes com LPA/SARA, Ranieri e col. 1314 confirmaram que o uso de volumes correntes menores reduz a concentragáo de mediadores inflamatórios tanto no lavado broncoalveolar quanto na circulagáo sistemica. Estudos posteriores confirmariam que essa prática viria a alterar o desfecho final desses pacientes 15-17. No principal desses estudos, o ARDS Network 18, comparou-se o uso de um volume corrente baixo (6 mL.kg-1 peso corporal previsto) e alto (12 mL.kg-1 peso corporal previsto). O uso de VC baixo com uma pressáo de plato máxima de 30 cmH2O resultou em mortalidade intra-hospitalar menor (31% versus 39%) e um número menor de dias na ventilagáo mecánica. O benefício na sobrevida desses pacientes permaneceu após o acompa-nhamento por seis meses.

Um novo estudo da ARDS Network 19, quatro anos mais tarde, avaliou o uso de pressáo expiratória final positiva (PEEP) alta (13,2 ± 3,5 cmH2O) versus PEEP baixa (8,3 ± 3,2 cmH2O) em pacientes com SARA ventilados de forma protetora (6 mL.kg-1 peso corporal previsto e pressáo de plato < 30 cmH2O). Náo houve diferenga estatística significante na mortalidade, no número de dias de ventilagáo mecánica ou no grau de disfungáo orgánica entre os grupos.

Durante o uso de ventilagáo protetora na SARA, o surgi-mento de hipercapnia e acidose respiratória pode ser esperado como parte dessa abordagem. Essa alteragáo, quando prevista, é chamada de hipercapnia permissiva. Na tentativa de se compensarem essas alteragoes, pode-se tentar o uso de frequencias respiratórias mais elevadas. A queda do pH até 7,15 geralmente é bem tolerada, com nenhuma ou peque-nas mudangas no débito cardíaco e na pressáo arterial 520. Situagoes em que a hipercapnia permissiva pode ser deleté-ria sáo hipertensáo intracraniana, acidose metabólica grave concomitante, hipertensáo pulmonar grave, insuficiencia do ventrículo direito e síndromes coronarianas.

O uso de ventilagáo mecánica na posigáo corporal prona durante a SARA parece melhorar a oxigenagáo e o recruta-mento alveolar, mas náo se viu benefício na mortalidade 21. A posigáo prona melhora a relagáo ventilagáo/perfusáo se as unidades alveolares mais acometidas estiverem em posigáo dependente. Vale lembrar que a ventilagáo nessa posigáo pode ter como complicagáo extubagáo inadvertida e perda de acessos venosos.

As recomendagoes para ventilagáo protetora em pacientes com SARA podem ser resumidas no Quadro 3.

TOXICIDADE PELO OXIGÉNIO

Estudos realizados em humanos e animais sugerem que a administragáo de oxigenio (O2) suplementar pode levar a diRevista Brasileira de Anestesiologia Vol. 61, No 5, Setembro-Outubro, 2011

Quadro 3 - Diretrizes para ventilagáo protetora em pacientes com LPA/SARA 22

Modos pressáo-controlado ou volume-controlado mostraram a mesma eficácia nessa populagáo. A experiencia do médico e a correta interpretagáo das mudangas fisiológicas sáo os elementos mais importantes na escolha.

Redugáo do volume corrente até aproximadamente 6 mL.kg-1 de peso corporal previsto; manutengáo de uma pressáo de plato < 30 cmH2O reduz a mortalidade e é fortemente recomendada (ARDS NETWORK 2000).

O aumento dos valores de PEEP para tentar reduzir a FiO2 náo é sustentado pelos estudos atuais. O uso de PEEP alta para evitar o desrecrutamento pulmonar é sugerido em estudos animais, porém, a forma de definir os valores ideais com esse fim ainda náo foi elucidada. Manobras de recrutamento parecem ser uma possibilidade para pacientes que respondem a valores elevados de PEEP, porém náo estáo indicadas em todos os pacientes.

Monitoragáo hemodinámica cuidadosa deve ser mantida em pacientes em ventilagáo mecánica protetora, devido ao risco de comprometimento da perfusáo tecidual com o ajuste desses parámetros.

Hipercapnia decorrente da ventilagáo mecánica protetora (hiper-capnia permissiva) é geralmente bem tolerada e preferível ao uso de volumes correntes elevados ou pressoes de plato elevadas.

Contraindicagoes a hipercapnia permissiva incluem: hipertensáo intracraniana, acidose metabólica grave concomitante, aumento da hipertensáo pulmonar, insuficiencia do ventrículo direito e síndromes coronarianas agudas 4._

LPA: lesáo pulmonar aguda; SARA: síndrome da angústia respiratória do adulto; PEEP: pressáo expiratória-final positiva; FiO2: fragáo inspirada de oxigénio.

ferentes espectros de lesáo da via aérea. Os efeitos da hi-peroxia nos pulmoes sáo conhecidos há algum tempo. De-monstrou-se que ela causa formagáo de membrana hialina alveolar, edema, hiperplasia, proliferagáo de pneumócitos tipo II, destruigáo de pneumócitos tipo I, fibrose intersticial e remodelagáo vascular pulmonar. A formagáo de espécies reativas de O2 na mitocondria é tida como principal causadora do dano alveolar difuso encontrado em animais submeti-dos a altas fragoes inspiradas desse gás 21. Em estudos en-volvendo humanos com doengas pulmonares é difícil definir o papel dessa possível toxicidade diante de tantas variáveis. Porém, no estudo já citado do ARDS Network 19, que com-parou PEEP alta versus PEEP baixa, os 273 pacientes com SARA ventilados com PEEP baixa necessitaram de FiO2 mais alta quando comparados com os ventilados com PEEP alta (n = 276), segundo protocolo proposto pelos pesquisa-dores. No entanto, náo houve diferenga estatística na morta-lidade antes da alta hospitalar e nos desfechos secundários. É importante lembrar que tal estudo náo foi desenhado para avaliar o desfecho em fungáo dos valores de FiO2, e sim dos valores de PEEP.

LPA/SARA RELACIONADA A VENTILAQAO MECANICA

Anteriormente, as lesoes pulmonares atribuídas ao uso de VC altos eram descritas apenas como a possibilidade de

extravasamento de ar para o espago pleural. Quando esse extravasamento ocorre devido a uma pressáo muito elevada nas vias aéreas, estabelece-se o barotrauma. Mais recente-mente, vém sendo descritas outras formas de lesáo associa-das á VM. O volutrauma resulta da hiperdistensáo das unidades alveolares, levando a um processo inflamatório local. O atelectrauma é consequéncia da lesáo alveolar causada pelo estresse na MAC diante de um recrutamento e um des-recrutamento instável a cada ciclo ventilatório. O biotrauma é a lesáo causada pela resposta inflamatória local e sistémica resultante das agressoes causadas tanto pelo volutrauma quanto pelo atelectrauma, ou ainda pela combinagáo de ambos 24.

Estudos com animais revelam que o uso de VC altos em pulmoes sadios leva rapidamente a alteragoes pulmonares similares ás alteragoes da SARA. A lesáo causada pela VM resulta em dano alveolar com consequente edema da membrana alvéolo-capilar, liberagáo de mediadores inflamatórios na circulagáo sistémica e ativagáo e deslocamento de células inflamatórias para os alvéolos 1.

Os efeitos deletérios do uso de VC altos foram verificados mesmo em pacientes ventilados por curtos períodos. Fernandez e col. 25 coletaram os VC intraoperatórios de pacientes submetidos a pneumectomias. De acordo com essa amostra, 18% dos pacientes desenvolveram insuficiencia respiratória aguda (IRpA) no pós-operatório e, em metade desses casos, os pacientes foram diagnosticados com LPA/ SARA. Após análise dos dados, verificou-se que os pacientes que desenvolveram IRpA foram ventilados com VC mais altos (média 8,3 x 6,7 mL.kg-1 de peso ideal, p < 0,001). A análise de regressáo logística mostrou ainda que o uso de altos VC intraoperatórios e de maior volume de reposigáo de fluídos intravascular foi identificado como fatores de risco para a IRpA pós-operatória.

Em estudo realizado com 52 pacientes, Michelet e col. 26 compararam os níveis de interleucina IL-1, IL-6 e IL-8 em pacientes submetidos a esofagectomias devido a cáncer, ventilados com VM convencional (VC 9 mL.kg-1 de peso ideal e sem PEEP) e VM protetora (VC 5 mL.kg-1 de peso ideal e PEEP 5 cmH2O). Pacientes que receberam VC protetora apresentaram níveis menores dos fatores inflamatórios tanto ao final da ventilagáo monopulmonar quanto 18 horas após a cirurgia. A VM protetora também resultou em melhor relagáo PaO2/FiO2 durante a ventilagáo monopulmonar e uma hora após a cirurgia, além de se verificar a redugáo no tempo de VM no pós-operatório.

Um ensaio clínico randomizado 27 com pacientes cirúrgicos admitidos em CTI comparou VC de 12 e 6 mL.kg-1 de peso corporal ideal. Foram excluídos pacientes em pós-operatório de neurocirurgia e cirurgia cardíaca. Pacientes ventilados com VC mais baixos tiveram menos infecgáo, ficaram menos tempo na VM e menos dias no CTI.

O Terceiro Consenso Brasileiro de Ventilagáo Mecánica 28, publicado em 2007, menciona a ventilagáo mecánica no in-traoperatório em pacientes sem doenga pulmonar, recomendando a aplicagáo de PEEP > 5 cmH2O durante a anestesia geral (grau de recomendagáo B), manobras de recrutamento

alveolar (grau de recomendagao B), FiO2 entre 30% a 40% ou a menor FiO2 para manter a saturagao de oxigenio acima de 98% (grau de recomendagao C) e a nao utilizagao de altos volumes correntes 28.

Um trabalho recente de Soubhie e col. 29 publicado na Revista Brasileira de Anestesiologia avaliou as modalidades ventilatórias utilizadas por anestesiologistas em todo o Brasil no período transoperatório por meio de um questionário. Demonstrou-se que 94% fazem uso de PEEP rotineiramen-te, enquanto 86,5% fazem uso de FiO2 entre 40% e 60%. Manobras de recrutamento alveolar no intraoperatório foram realizadas por 78,4%, porém apenas 30% utilizavam estra-tégia protetora de ventilagáo mecánica com VC inferior a 7 mL.kg-1.

É importante enfatizar que o termo "VC baixo", na verda-de, deveria ser denominado "VC normal", pois mamíferos tem habitualmente um VC de aproximadamente 6,3 mL.kg-1. Na maioria dos trabalhos, o volume corrente é calculado com base no peso corporal predito, que tem como variáveis sexo e altura do paciente. Isso é muito importante para evitar que o VC calculado para a VM seja, iatrogenicamente, superesti-mado ou subestimado (Quadro 4) 1.

CONCLUSÁO

Ainda faltam estudos consistentes para determinar qual seria o melhor modo de se ventilar um paciente com pulmáo saudável. As recomendagoes dos especialistas e as atuais evidencias apresentadas neste artigo indicam que o uso de um VC inferior a 10 mL.kg-1 de peso corporal ideal, associado a PEEP > 5 cmH2O e sem ultrapassar uma pressáo de plato de 15 a 20 cmH2O, poderia minimizar o estiramento alveolar no final da inspiragáo e evitar uma possível inflamagáo ou colabamento alveolar.

É importante ressaltar que em alguns pacientes com pulmáo sadio submetidos a VM por curto período para procedimientos de baixo risco, um VC de 10 mL.kg-1 pode náo causar estiramento alveolar ao final da inspiragáo, náo levando ás consequencias já citadas. Pelo contrário, quando esses pacientes sáo ventilados com pressáo de plato < 15 cmH2O sem PEEP, o uso de VC baixos pode conduzir a atelectasias. Uma PEEP suficiente deve ser usada nesses casos, a fim de evitar essa ocorrencia e um possível comprometimento da oxigenagáo. O mesmo náo ocorre em pacientes em respira-gáo espontánea. Nesse caso, mesmo com pressoes de plato baixas, a pressáo transalveolar mantém a pressáo pleural "negativa", evitando colabamentos alveolares.

REFERÊNCIAS / REFERENCES

1. Schultz MJ, Haitsma JJ, Slutsky AS et al. - What tidal volumes should be used in patients without acute lung injury? Anesthesiology, 2007;106:1226-31.

2. Ashbaugh DG, Bigelow DB, Petty TL et al. - Acute respiratory distress in adults. Lancet, 1967;2:319-323.

3. Bernard GR, Artigas A, Brigham KL et al. - The American-European Consensus Conference on ARDS. Definitions, mechanisms, relevant outcomes, and clinical trial coordination. Am J Respir Crit Care Med, 1994;149(3 Pt 1):818-824.

4. Cehovic GA, Hatton, KW, Fahy BG - Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome. Int Anesthesiol Clin, 2009;1:83-95.

5. The Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network - Ventilation with lower tidal volumes as compared with traditional tidal volumes for acute lung injury and the acute respiratory distress syndrome. N Engl J Med, 2000;342:1301-1308.

6. Wiedemann HP, Wheeler AP, Bernard GR et al. - Comparison of two fluid-management strategies in acute lung injury. N Engl J Med, 2006;354:2564-2575.

7. Wheeler AP, Bernard GR, Thompson BT et al. - Pulmonary-artery versus central venous catheter to guide treatment of acute lung injury. N Engl J Med, 2006;354:2213-2224.

8. Brun-Buisson C, Minelli C, Bertolini G et al. - Epidemiology and outcome of acute lung injury in European intensive care units. Results from the ALIVE study. Intensive Care Med, 2004;30:51-61.

9. Ware LB - Prognostic determinants of acute respiratory distress syndrome in adults: impact on clinical trial design. Crit Care Med, 2005;33(3 suppl):S217-S222.

10. Rubenfeld GD, Caldwell E, Peabody E et al. - Incidence and outcomes of acute lung injury. N Engl J Med, 2005;353:1685-1693.

11. Habashi NM - Other approaches to open-lung ventilation: airway pressure release ventilation. Crit Care Med, 2005;33(3 suppl):S228-S240.

12. Suratt BT, Parsons PE - Mechanisms of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome. Clin Chest Med, 2006;27:579-589.

13. Ranieri VM, Suter PM, Tortorella C et al. - Effect of mechanical ventilation on nflammatory mediators in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome: A randomized controlled trial. JAMA, 1999;282:54-61.

14. Ranieri VM, Giunta F, Suter PM et al. - Mechanical ventilation as a mediator of multisystem organ failure in acute respiratory distress syndrome. JAMA, 2000;284:43-4.

15. Eisner MD, Parsons P, Matthay MA et al. - Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network. Plasma surfactant protein levels and clinical outcomes in patients with acute lung injury. Thorax, 2003;58:983-988.

16. Amato MB, Barbas CS, Medeiros DM et al. - Effect of a protective-ventilation strategy on mortality in the acute respiratory distress syndrome. N Engl J Med, 1998;338:347-54.

17. Parsons PE, Matthay MA, Ware LB et al. - Elevated plasma levels of soluble TNF receptors are associated with morbidity and mortality in patients with acute lung injury. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol, 2005;288:L426-L431.

18. The Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network - Ventilation with lower tidal volumes as compared with traditional tidal volumes for acute lung injury and the acute respiratory distress syndrome. N Engl J Med, 2000;342:1301-8.

19. The Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network - Higher versus lower positive end-expiratory pressures in patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome. N Engl J Med, 2004;351:327-36.

20. Forsythe SM, Schmidt GA - Sodium bicarbonate for the treatment of lactic acidosis. Chest, 2000;117:260-267.

21. Mancebo J, Ferna'ndez R, Blanch L et al. - A multicenter trial of prolonged prone ventilation in severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. Am J Respir Crit Care Med, 2006;173:1233-1239.

Quadro 4 - Cálculo do peso corporal predito em quilogramas (kg) 1

Sexo masculino Sexo feminino

50 + 0,91 x (altura em centímetros - 152,4) 45,5 + 0,91 x (altura em centímetros - 152,4)

22. Donahoe M - Basic Ventilator Management: Lung Protective Strategies. Surg Clin N Am, 2006;86:1389-1408.

23. Li LF, Liao SK, Ko YS et al. - Hyperoxia increases ventilator-induced lung injury via mitogen-activated protein kinases: a prospective, controlled animal experiment. Critical Care, 2007;11:R25.

24. Pinhu L, Whitehead T, Evans T et al. - Ventilator-associated lung injury. Lancet, 2003;361:332-40.

25. Fernandez-Perez ER, Keegan MT, Brown DR et al. - Intraoperative tidal volume as a risk factor for respiratory failure after pneumonectomy. Anesthesiology, 2006;105:14-8.

26. Michelet P, D' Journo XB, Roch A et al. - Protective ventilation influences systemic inflammation after esophagectomy: A randomized controlled study. Anesthesiology, 2006;105:911-9.

27. Lee PC, Helsmoortel CM, Cohn SM et al. - Are low tidal volumes safe? Chest, 1990;97:430-4.

28. Amato MB, Carvalho CR, Isola A et al. - III Consenso Brasileiro de Ventilagáo Mecánica: Ventilagáo mecánica no intra-operatório. J Bras Pneumol, 2007;33(supl 2): s137-141.

29. Soubhie A, Silva ED, Simöes CM et al. - Evaluation of Trasopera-tory Ventilation Modalities by a Questionnaire. Rev Bras Anestesiol, 2010;60:4:415-421.

Resumen: Seiberlich E, Santana JA, Chaves RA, Seiberlich RC -Ventilación Mecánica Protectora, ¿Por qué utilizarla?

Justificativa y objetivos: Las estrategias de ventilación mecánica (VM), han venido sufriendo modificaciones en las últimas décadas, con una tendencia al uso de volúmenes corrientes (VC) cada vez menores. Sin embargo, en los pacientes sin Lesión Pulmonar Aguda (LPA) o SARA (Síndrome de la angustia respiratoria del adulto), el uso de VC altos todavía es algo muy común. Estudios retrospectivos sugieren que el uso de esa práctica puede estar relacionado con la LPA asociada a la ventilación mecánica. El objetivo de esta revisión, es buscar evidencias científicas que guíen una VM protectora para los pacientes con pulmones sanos y sugerir estrategias para una adecuada ventilación de un pulmón con LPA/SARA.

Contenido: Se realizó una revisión basándonos en los principales artículos que engloban el uso de las estrategias de ventilación mecánica.

Conclusiones: Todavía faltan estudios consistentes para determinar cuál sería la mejor manera de ventilar a un paciente con un pulmón sano. Las recomendaciones de los expertos, y las actuales evidencias presentadas en este artículo, indican que el uso de un VC menor que 10 mL.kg-1 de peso corporal ideal asociado a la PEEP 5 cmH2O y sin rebasar una presión de meseta de 15 a 20 cmH2O, podría minimizar el estiramiento alveolar al final de la inspiración y evitar una posible inflamación o colapso alveolar.

Descriptores: COMPLICACIONES: Atelectasia; EQUIPOS: Sistema respiratorio, Ventilador; VENTILACIÓN: Generalidades.