Scholarly article on topic 'Elevated CO2 (FACE) Affects Food and Feed Quality of Cereals (Wheat, Barley, Maize): Interactions with N and Water Supply'

Elevated CO2 (FACE) Affects Food and Feed Quality of Cereals (Wheat, Barley, Maize): Interactions with N and Water Supply Academic research paper on "Agriculture, forestry, and fisheries"

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Procedia Environmental Sciences
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Keywords
{"Winter Barley" / Maize / "Winter Wheat" / Quality / "Elemental Composition" / Minerals / Fibers / "Protein Composition" / "Carbon Dioxide" / "Drought Stress" / "Nitrogen Supply" / "Field Experiment" / "Climate Change"}

Abstract of research paper on Agriculture, forestry, and fisheries, author of scientific article — Martin Erbs, Remy Manderscheid, Giesela Jansen, Sylvia Seddig, Stefanie Wroblewitz, et al.

Abstract Climate change will not only affect crop biomass production but also crop quality. While increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations are known to enhance photosynthesis and biomass production, effects on the chemical composition of plants are less well known. This is particularly true for major crop plants with respect to harvestable yield quality. Moreover, it remains open, how these effects on quality may be realized under field conditions and how management (e.g. plant N nutrition) or environmental factors (e.g. water availability) will alter impacts of elevated CO2. Here we report on a series of free air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments with wheat and barley and with maize in which effects of elevated CO2 combined with different levels of N supply (wheat and barley) and with drought stress (maize) on grain and biomass quality characteristics were investigated. Winter wheat and winter barley (1st experiment) and maize (2nd experiment) were grown in the field each for two growing seasons under ambient and elevated CO2 concentration (FACE, 550μmol mol-1). Wheat and barley were grown under adequate N supply and under 50% of adequate N as sub-treatments. In the maize experiment rain shelters were used to create two different levels of plant water supply (well-watered and drought stress – about 50% of well-watered) as sub-treatments. Treatment effects on elemental composition and a variety of quality characteristics of the plant material at final harvest were investigated. This included a detailed analysis of wheat grain protein components and of different fiber fractions of maize. Compiled results of the relative effects of elevated CO2, N and drought stress treatments on different quality parameters of the crops are presented.

Academic research paper on topic "Elevated CO2 (FACE) Affects Food and Feed Quality of Cereals (Wheat, Barley, Maize): Interactions with N and Water Supply"

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Procedía Environmental Sciences 29 (2015) 57 - 58

Agriculture and Climate Change - Adapting Crops to Increased Uncertainty (AGRI 2015)

Elevated CO2 (FACE) affects Food and Feed Quality of Cereals (Wheat, Barley, Maize): Interactions with N and Water Supply

Martin Erbsa, Remy Manderscheid1, Giesela Jansen , Sylvia Seddigb, Stefanie Wroblewitzc, Liane Hütherc, Anke Schenderleinc, Herbert Wieserd, Sven Dänickec, HansJoachim Weigela*

a Thünen-Institute of Biodiversity, Federal Research Institute for Rural Areas, Forestry and Fisheries, 38116 Braunschweig,

Germany

b Institute for Resistance Research and Stress Tolerance, Julius Kühn-Institute, Federal Research Centre for Cultivated Plants,

18190 Sanitz, Germany

c Institute of Animal Nutrition, Friedrich-Loeffler-Institute, Federal Research Institute for Animal Health, 38116 Braunschweig,

Germany

d German Research Centre for Food Chemistry and Hans-Dieter-Belitz-Institute for Cereal Research, 85748 Garching, Germany

Abstract

Climate change will not only affect crop biomass production but also crop quality. While increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations are known to enhance photosynthesis and biomass production, effects on the chemical composition of plants are less well known. This is particularly true for major crop plants with respect to harvestable yield quality. Moreover, it remains open, how these effects on quality may be realized under field conditions and how management (e.g. plant N nutrition) or environmental factors (e.g. water availability) will alter impacts of elevated CO2. Here we report on a series of free air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments with wheat and barley and with maize in which effects of elevated CO2 combined with different levels of N supply (wheat and barley) and with drought stress (maize) on grain and biomass quality characteristics were investigated. Winter wheat and winter barley (1st experiment) and maize (2nd experiment) were grown in the field each for two growing seasons under ambient and elevated CO2 concentration (FACE, 550 ^mol mol-1). Wheat and barley were grown under adequate N supply and under 50% of adequate N as sub-treatments. In the maize experiment rain shelters were used to create two different levels of plant water supply (well-watered and drought stress - about 50% of well-watered) as sub-treatments. Treatment effects on elemental composition and a variety of quality characteristics of the plant material at final harvest were investigated. This included a detailed analysis of wheat grain protein components and of different fiber fractions of maize.

* Corresponding author. Tel.: +49-531-596-2501; fax: +49-537-596-2599. E-mail address: hans.weigel@ti.bund.de

1878-0296 © 2015 Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

Peer-review under responsibility of the organizing committee of the Agriculture and Climate Change - Adapting Crops to Increased

Uncertainty (AGRI 2015)

doi:10.1016/j.proenv.2015.07.155

Martin Erbs et al. /Procedia Environmental Sciences 29 (2015) 57 - 58

Compiled results of the relative effects of elevated CO2, N and drought stress treatments on different quality parameters of the crops are presented.

© 2015Published byElsevierB.VThisis anopenaccess article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

Peer-review under responsibility of the organizing committee of the Agriculture and Climate Change - Adapting Crops to Increased Uncertainty(AGRI2015)

Keywords: Winter Barley; Maize; Winter Wheat; Quality; Elemental Composition; Minerals; Fibers; Protein Composition; Carbon Dioxide; Drought Stress; Nitrogen Supply; Field Experiment; Climate Change